Percy Herbert, 2nd Baron Powis

Last updated

Percy Herbert, 2nd Baron Powis (1598 – 19 January 1667), known as Sir Percy Herbert, Bt, between 1622 and 1655, was an English writer and politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1621 to 1622 and later inherited a peerage.

House of Commons of England parliament of England up to 1707

The House of Commons of England was the lower house of the Parliament of England from its development in the 14th century to the union of England and Scotland in 1707, when it was replaced by the House of Commons of Great Britain. In 1801, with the union of Great Britain and Ireland, that house was in turn replaced by the House of Commons of the United Kingdom.

Herbert was the son of William Herbert, 1st Baron Powis, and his wife Eleanor Percy (d. 1650). He was named after the surname of his maternal grandfather Henry Percy, 8th Earl of Northumberland and belonged to a recusant (i. e. Roman Catholic) branch of the Herbert family living in Powis Castle.

William Herbert, 1st Baron Powis Welsh politician

William Herbert, 1st Baron Powis was a Welsh politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1597 and 1629.

Henry Percy, 8th Earl of Northumberland, 2nd Baron Percy was an English nobleman and conspirator.

Powis Castle Historic house museum in Powys, Wales

Powis Castle is a medieval castle, fortress and grand country mansion near Welshpool, in Powys, Wales.

In 1621 Herbert was elected Member of Parliament for Shaftesbury at a by-election after the previously elected member was expelled. He was knighted on 7 November 1622, and was created a baronet on 16 November 1622. Herbert inherited the title Baron Powis on the death of his father in 1655.

Shaftesbury was a parliamentary constituency in Dorset. It returned two Members of Parliament to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1295 until 1832 and one member until the constituency was abolished in 1885.

Marriage and issue

On 19 November 1622 Herbert married Elizabeth Craven (bap. 1600, d. 1662), first surviving daughter of Sir William Craven (c.1545–1618), converting her to Catholicism. Their only son William Herbert, 1st Marquess of Powis became the 1st Earl of Powis and then 1st Marquess of Powis.

William Craven (Lord Mayor of London) English merchant and Lord Mayor of London

Sir William Craven was an English merchant, Lord Mayor of London in 1610. It has been noted that the story of Dick Whittington has some similarities to Craven's career, though the story was first published before Craven became Lord Mayor.

William Herbert, 1st Marquess of Powis English marquess

William Herbert, 1st Marquess of Powis, PC was an English nobleman, best remembered for his suffering during the Popish Plot.

Digital object identifier Character string used as a permanent identifier for a digital object, in a format controlled by the International DOI Foundation

In computing, a digital object identifier (DOI) is a persistent identifier or handle used to identify objects uniquely, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). An implementation of the Handle System, DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos.

Parliament of England
Preceded by
William Beecher
Thomas Sheppard
Member of Parliament for Shaftesbury
1621–1622
With: Ralph Hopton
Succeeded by
William Whitaker
John Thoroughgood
Baronetage of England
New creation Baronet
(of Red Castle)
1622–1667
Succeeded by
William Herbert
Peerage of England
Preceded by
William Herbert
Baron Powis
1655–1667
Succeeded by
William Herbert

Related Research Articles

Earl of Powis British Earl

Earl of Powis (Powys) is a title that has been created three times. The first creation came in the Peerage of England in 1674 in favour of William Herbert, 3rd Baron Powis, a descendant of William Herbert, 1st Earl of Pembroke. In 1687, he was further honoured when he was made Marquess of Powis. For more information on this creation of the earldom, which became extinct in 1748, see the latter title.

Spencer Compton, 2nd Earl of Northampton English politician

Spencer Compton, 2nd Earl of Northampton, styled Lord Compton from 1618 to 1630, was an English soldier and politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1621 to 1622. He became a peer by writ of acceleration in 1626 and by inheritance in 1630. He fought in the Royalist army and was killed in action at the Battle of Hopton Heath.

Marquess of Powis

Marquess of Powis was a title in the Peerage of England. It was created in 1687 for William Herbert, 1st Earl of Powis. He had already succeeded his father as third Baron Powis in 1667 and had been created Earl of Powis in the Peerage of England in 1674; Marquess of Powis and Viscount Montgomery in 1687.When James II went into exile in France, the Marquess followed him. He served as Comptroller of the Royal Household and his wife Elizabeth as Governess of the Royal children. He was rewarded in 1698 by the titles Duke of Powis and Marquess of Montgomery, but these titles in the Jacobite Peerage were not recognised in England.

John Manners, 8th Earl of Rutland English politician and Earl

John Manners, 8th Earl of Rutland, was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1640 until 1641 when he inherited the peerage.

William Craven, 1st Earl of Craven (1608–1697) English nobleman and soldier, Bahamian colonial administrator

William Craven, 1st Earl of Craven, PC was an English nobleman and soldier.

This is a list of people who served as Lord Lieutenant of Middlesex. From 1794 to 1965, all Lord Lieutenants were also Custos Rotulorum of Middlesex. The office was abolished on 1 April 1965, with the creation of Greater London and the post of Lord Lieutenant of Greater London, with small parts of Middlesex coming under the jurisdiction of the Lord Lieutenant of Surrey, the Lord Lieutenant of Hertfordshire.

William Herbert, 1st Earl of Pembroke (died 1469) 15th-century English noble

William Herbert, 1st Earl of PembrokeKG, known as "Black William", was a Welsh nobleman, soldier, politician, and courtier. He was the son of William ap Thomas, founder of Raglan Castle, and Gwladys ferch Dafydd Gam, and grandson of Dafydd Gam, an adherent of King Henry V of England.

William Herbert, 2nd Marquess of Powis Welsh aristocrat and Jacobite

William Herbert, 2nd Marquess of Powis was a Welsh aristocrat and Jacobite supporter.

William Spencer, 2nd Baron Spencer of Wormleighton English nobleman, politician, and peer from the Spencer family

William Spencer, 2nd Baron Spencer of Wormleighton MP was an English nobleman, politician, and peer from the Spencer family.

Herbert baronets

There have been seven baronetcies created for persons with the surname Herbert, three in the Baronetage of England, one in the Baronetage of Ireland and three in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom. All creations are extinct.

House of Herbert family

The House of Herbert is a British Noble House founded by William Herbert, known as "Black William", the son of William ap Thomas, founder of Raglan Castle, a follower of Edward IV of England in the Wars of the Roses. The name Herbert originated in 1461 when William was granted the title Baron Herbert of Raglan, having assumed an English-style surname in place of his Welsh patronymic, ap William.

Richard Herbert, 2nd Baron Herbert of Chirbury English politician

Richard Herbert, 2nd Baron Herbert of Chirbury was an Anglo-Welsh Member of Parliament, a Royalist who fought with the rank of colonel in the English Civil War, and a peer whose membership of the House of Lords was curtailed by its abolition in 1649.

George Herbert, 4th Earl of Powis British peer

George Charles Herbert, 4th Earl of Powis DL JP, known as George Herbert until 1891, was a British peer.

James Palmer (1585–1658) English herald and miniature painter

Sir James Palmer was an English Member of Parliament and Chancellor of the Order of the Garter.

Pipewell Hall, Northamptonshire

Pipewell Hall in Northamptonshire, England, is a building of historical significance and is Grade II listed on the English Heritage Register. It was built near the ruins of a Cistercian abbey in 1675. At this time it was owned by the Barons of Powis. The house was constructed from the stones of the abbey. The Hall was the home of many notable people over the next three centuries and is now a wedding venue.