Pernik Province

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Coordinates: 42°35′N23°0′E / 42.583°N 23.000°E / 42.583; 23.000

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Pernik Province

Област Перник
Pernik in Bulgaria.svg
Location of Pernik Province in Bulgaria
Country Bulgaria
Capital Pernik
Municipalities 6
Government
  GovernorIrena Sokolova
Area
  Total2,390.5 km2 (923.0 sq mi)
Population
  Total133,530
  Density56/km2 (140/sq mi)
Time zone UTC+2 (EET)
  Summer (DST) UTC+3 (EEST)
License plate PK

Pernik Province is a province in western Bulgaria, neighbouring Serbia. Its main city is Pernik, and other municipalities are Breznik, Kovachevtsi, Radomir, Tran, and Zemen.

Topographic map of Pernik Province Bulgaria Pernik Province topographic map.svg
Topographic map of Pernik Province

Population

Pernik province had a population of 133,750 according to the 2011 census, of which

The following table represents the change of the population in the province after World War II:

Pernik Province
Year19461956196519751985199220012005200720092011
Population172,389180,228180,883174,624174,044163,307149,832140,981138,773136,249133,530
Sources: National Statistical Institute, [1] „Census 2001“, [2] „Census 2011“, [3] „pop-stat.mashke.org“,??

Ethnic groups

Ethnic groups in Pernik Province (2011 census)
Ethnic groupPercentage
Bulgarians
96.4%
Romani
2.8%
others and indefinable
0.7%

Total population (2011 census): 133 530 [5]

Ethnic groups (2011 census): [6] Identified themselves: 125 422 persons:

Ethnic groups in the province according to 2001 census: [7]

Religion

Religious adherence in the province according to 2001 census: [8]

Census 2001
religious adherencepopulation %
Orthodox Christians 146 141
Protestants 356
Muslims 178
Roman Catholics 92
Other496
Religion not mentioned2 569
total149 832100%

Economy

Industry is of vital importance for the economy of the province. Pernik is the major manufacturing centre, one of the largest in the country with the "Stomana" steel complex; heavy machinery (mining and industrial equipment); building materials and textiles being the most important. There is an enormous plant for heavy machinery in Radomir which produces excavators and industrial equipment, but is currently not working at full capacity.

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 (in Bulgarian) Bulgarian National Statistical Institute - 2011 census Archived 2011-07-14 at the Wayback Machine
  2. 1 2 (in English) „WorldCityPopulation“
  3. 1 2 „pop-stat.mashke.org“
  4. (in Bulgarian) Population by 01.02.2011 by Area and Sex Archived 2011-04-08 at the Wayback Machine from Bulgarian National Statistical Institute: Preliminary results of Census 2011
  5. (in Bulgarian) Population on 01.02.2011 by provinces, municipalities, settlements and age; National Statistical Institute
  6. Population by province, municipality, settlement and ethnic identification, by 01.02.2011; Bulgarian National Statistical Institute (in Bulgarian)
  7. (in Bulgarian) Population to 01.03.2001 by District and Ethnic Group from Bulgarian National Statistical Institute: Census 2001 Archived 2017-11-10 at the Wayback Machine
  8. (in Bulgarian) Religious adherence in Bulgaria - census 2001 Archived 2010-09-07 at the Wayback Machine