Peter Muhlenberg

Last updated

  1. Archiv der Franckeschen Stiftungen, AF St/S B I 94 I, 575–577
  2. Horn, Joshua (November 9, 2015). "Peter Muhlenberg: The Pastor Turned Soldier". Journal of the American Revolution. Retrieved November 29, 2015.
  3. "Congress slaveowners", The Washington Post, January 19, 2022, retrieved July 11, 2022
  4. 1 2 "History Detectives Season 5, Episode 5 – Transcript" (PDF). Oregon Public Broadcasting. 2007. Retrieved August 20, 2008.
  5. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on February 22, 2011. Retrieved August 9, 2010.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  6. "Muhlenberg a recruiter for the Revolutionary War?". The Lutheran. 2007. Archived from the original on January 4, 2014.
  7. Hamner, Christopher. Black-Robed Regiment. Teachinghistory.org. Accessed June 2, 2011.
  8. "Officers Represented in the Society of the Cincinnati". The American Revolution Institute of the Society of the Cincinnati. Retrieved March 19, 2021.
  9. Sanford W. Higginbotham, The Keystone in the Democratic Arch: Pennsylvania Politics, 1800-1816 (Harrisburg, PA: Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission, 1952), pp. 32-34.
  10. Sanford W. Higginbotham, The Keystone in the Democratic Arch: Pennsylvania Politics, 1800-1816 (Harrisburg, PA: Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission, 1952), pp. 96-100.
  11. Sanford W. Higginbotham, The Keystone in the Democratic Arch: Pennsylvania Politics, 1800-1816 (Harrisburg, PA: Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission, 1952), pp. 99-100.
  12. Association, John Conrad Weiser Family (1960). The Weiser family: a genealogy of the family of John Conrad Weiser, the elder (d. 1746); prepared on the two hundred fiftieth anniversary of his arrival in America, 1710-1760. John Conrad Weiser Family Assoc. p. 168. Retrieved December 18, 2019.
  13. 1 2 Wayland, John Walter (1980). A History of Shenandoah County, Virginia. Genealogical Publishing Com. p. 623. ISBN   978-0-8063-8011-7 . Retrieved December 18, 2019.
  14. "John Peter Gabriel Muhlenberg". aoc.gov. Architect of the Capitol . Retrieved December 18, 2019.
  15. The Register of the Kentucky State Historical Society, Volume 1. Kentucky State Historical Society. 1903. p.  36.
  16. Bicentennial:Dunmore 1772-1778; Shenandoah 1778-1972 *Shenandoah County Bicentennial Committee 1972) p. 54

Further reading

Peter Muhlenberg
Peter Muhlenberg2.jpg
United States Senator
from Pennsylvania
In office
March 4, 1801 June 30, 1801
Political offices
Preceded by Member, Supreme Executive Council of Pennsylvania,
representing Montgomery County

October 24, 1785 – October 16, 1788
Succeeded by
Zebulon Potts
Preceded by Vice-President of Pennsylvania
October 31, 1787 – October 14, 1788
Succeeded by
U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
District Created
Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
from Pennsylvania's at-large congressional district

1789–1791
Served alongside: George Clymer, Thomas Fitzsimons, Thomas Hartley, Frederick A.C. Muhlenberg, Henry Wynkoop, Daniel Hiester and Thomas Scott
Succeeded by
Preceded by Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
from Pennsylvania's at-large congressional district

1793–1795
Served alongside: Thomas Fitzsimons, John W. Kittera, Thomas Hartley, Frederick A.C. Muhlenberg, James Armstrong, Thomas Scott, Andrew Gregg, Daniel Hiester, William Irvine, William Findley, John Smilie, and William Montgomery
Succeeded by
Preceded by Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
from Pennsylvania's 4th congressional district

1799–1801
alongside: Robert Brown
Succeeded by
U.S. Senate
Preceded by U.S. senator (Class 3) from Pennsylvania
1801
Served alongside: James Ross
Succeeded by