Pherendates II

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Pherendates II
Satrap of Egypt
Western part of the Achaemenid Empire.jpg
Pherendates II was satrap of the restored Achaemenid Province of Egypt.
Predecessoroffice restored
Successor Sabaces
Dynasty 31st Dynasty
Pharaoh Artaxerxes III

Pherendates II was an Achaemenid satrap of ancient Egypt during the 4th century BCE, at the time of the 31st Dynasty of Egypt.

Almost nothing is known about him. In his Bibliotheca historica , Diodorus Siculus [1] reports that, after the battle of Pelusium (343 BCE) and the subsequent Achaemenid conquest of Egypt, Artaxerxes III appointed Pherendates II as satrap. [2] His office must have been very brief, since his successor Sabaces was killed in the battle of Issus (333 BCE) while serving Darius III. [3] [4] [5]

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References

  1. Diodorus Siculus, Bibliotheca historica 16.46.4; 16.51.3
  2. ARTAXERXES III at the Encyclopædia Iranica .
  3. Arrian, Anabasis Alexandri 2.11.8
  4. Siculus, op. cit. 17.34.5
  5. Quintus Curtius Rufus, Historiae Alexandri Magni 3.11.10; 4.1.28
Preceded by
office restored
Satrap of Egypt
c.343 – before 333 BCE
Succeeded by
Sabaces