Philibert of Chalon

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Philibert of Chalon, Prince of Orange
Philibert de Chalon 16. Jh.jpg
Philibert of Châlon
Born(1502-03-18)18 March 1502
Nozeroy, Franche-Comté
Died 3 August 1530(1530-08-03) (aged 28)
Outside Florence, Italy
Noble family House of Chalon-Arlay
Father John IV lord of Arlay
Mother Philiberta of Luxembourg

Philibert de Chalon (18 March 1502 – 3 August 1530) was the last Prince of Orange from the House of Chalon.

Prince of Orange title originally from the Principality of Orange

Prince of Orange is a title originally associated with the sovereign Principality of Orange, in what is now southern France. Under the Treaty of Utrecht of 1713, Frederick William I of Prussia ceded the Principality of Orange to King Louis XIV of France. After William III of England died without children, a dispute arose between Johan Willem Friso and Frederick I of Prussia, which was settled in the Treaty of Partition (1732); consequently, Friso's son, William IV had to share use of the title "Prince of Orange" with Frederick William I of Prussia. The title is traditionally borne by the heir apparent of the Dutch monarch. The title descends via absolute primogeniture since 1983, meaning that its holder can be either Prince or Princess of Orange.

Contents

Biography

Born at Nozeroy to John IV of Chalon-Arlay, Philibert served Emperor Charles V as commander in Italy, fighting in the War of the League of Cognac. He took part in the Sack of Rome [1] and was killed during the final stages of the Siege of Florence (1530). [2] An interesting exchange of letters during the siege between him and Charles still survives.

Nozeroy Commune in Bourgogne-Franche-Comté, France

Nozeroy is a commune in the Jura department in Franche-Comté in eastern France.

John IV of Chalon-Arlay Prince of Orange

John IV of Chalon-Arlay or John of Chalon was a prince of Orange and lord of Arlay. He played an important role in the Mad War, a series of conflicts in which aristocrats sought to resist the expansion and centralisation of power under the French monarch.

Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor 16th-century Holy Roman Emperor

Charles V was Holy Roman Emperor (1519–1556), King of Germany (1520-1556), King of Italy (1530-1556), King of Spain (1516-1556), King of the Indies (1521-1556), Lord of the Habsburg Netherlands (1506–1555), and head of the House of Austria (1519-1556). Charles V revitalized the medieval concept of the universal monarchy of Charlemagne and travelled from city to city, with no single fixed capital: overall he spent 28 years in the Habsburg Netherlands, 18 years in Spain, and 9 years in Germany. After four decades of incessant warfare with the Protestants, the Ottoman Empire, and the Kingdom of France, Charles V abandoned his multi-national project with a series of abdications between 1554 and 1556 in favor of his son Philip II of Spain and brother Ferdinand I of Austria. The personal union of his European and American territories, spanning over nearly 4 million square kilometres, was the first collection of realms to be defined as "the empire on which the sun never sets".

He was succeeded as Prince of Orange by the son of his sister (Claudia of Chalon), Renatus of Nassau-Breda, who thus founded the House of Orange-Nassau.

Claudia of Chalon-Orange was the second wife of Henry III of Nassau-Breda, whom she had married in 1515. She was the mother of René of Chalon, lord of Breda, the first Nassau to be Prince of Orange.

René of Chalon Prince of Orange

René of Chalon, also known as Renatus of Chalon, was a Prince of Orange and stadtholder of Holland, Zeeland, Utrecht and Gelre.

House of Orange-Nassau branch of the European House of Nassau

The House of Orange-Nassau, a branch of the European House of Nassau, has played a central role in the politics and government of the Netherlands and Europe especially since William the Silent organized the Dutch revolt against Spanish rule, which after the Eighty Years' War (1568–1648) led to an independent Dutch state.

Portrait of Philbert Prince of Orange from a contemporary portrait. Philbert Prince of Orange.png
Portrait of Philbert Prince of Orange from a contemporary portrait.

Ancestors

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Sack of Rome (1527)

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War of the League of Cognac conflict

The War of the League of Cognac (1526–30) was fought between the Habsburg dominions of Charles V—primarily the Holy Roman Empire and Habsburg Spain—and the League of Cognac, an alliance including the Kingdom of France, Pope Clement VII, the Republic of Venice, the Kingdom of England, the Duchy of Milan and the Republic of Florence.

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The Battle of Gavinana was a battle in the War of the League of Cognac. It was fought on 3 August 1530 between the city of Florence and the army of the Holy Roman Empire.

Philibert may refer to the following people:

Siege of Florence (1529–30) siege

The Siege of Florence took place from 24 October 1529 to 10 August 1530, at the end of the War of the League of Cognac. A large Imperial and Spanish army under Philibert of Châlon, Prince of Orange and Pier Maria III de' Rossi surrounded the city, and, after a siege of nearly ten months, captured it, overthrowing the Republic of Florence and installing Alessandro de' Medici as the ruler of the city.

Duchy of Florence The Duchy of Florence was an Italian principality that was centred on the city of Florence, in Tuscany, Italy

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This page is a list of the lords of Chalon-Arlay and the principality of Orange. The lords of Chalons and Arlay were a cadet branch of the ruling house of the county of Burgundy, the Anscarids or House of Ivrea.

House of Chalon-Arlay noble family

The House of Chalon-Arlay was a French noble house, a cadet branch of the House of Ivrea. The founder of the house is John I of Chalon-Arlay, fifth son of John, Count of Chalon. When John III lord of Arlay married to Mary de Baux, princess of Orange, the House acquired the principality of Orange.

The Battle of Landriano took place on 21 June 1529, between the French army under Francis de Bourbon, Comte de St. Pol and the Imperial–Spanish army commanded by Don Antonio de Leyva, Duke of Terranova in the context of the War of the League of Cognac. The French army was destroyed and marked the temporary end of the ambitions of Francis I of France to vie for control of northern Italy with Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor.

References

  1. Pitts 1993, p. 350-351.
  2. Fletcher 2016, p. 61.

Sources

Philibert of Chalon
Born: 18 March 1502 3 August
Preceded by
John II of Châlon
Prince of Orange
15021530
Succeeded by
René of Chalon
Government offices
Preceded by
Ugo de Moncada
Viceroy of Naples
15281530
Succeeded by
Pompeo Colonna

Sources