Philip I, Count of Auvergne

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Philip I
Armes Philippe Monsieur de Bourgogne.svg
Coat of arms of Philip of Burgundy
Count of Auvergne and Boulogne (as consors)
Reign1338 - 1346
Predecessor Joan I
as sole ruler
Successor Joan I
as sole ruler
Born(1323-11-10)10 November 1323
Died10 August 1346(1346-08-10) (aged 22)
Spouse Joan I, Countess of Auvergne
Issue Philip I, Duke of Burgundy
House Burgundy
Father Odo IV, Duke of Burgundy
Mother Joan III of France
Religion Roman Catholicism

Philip of Burgundy (10 November 1323 – 10 August 1346) was Count of Auvergne and Boulogne (as Philip I) in right of his wife and was the only son and heir of Odo IV, Duke of Burgundy, and of Joan III, Countess of Burgundy. His mother was the daughter of King Philip V of France and of Joan II, Countess of Burgundy. [1]

Contents

He married Joan I, Countess of Auvergne and Boulogne, in c. 1338.

In 1340, he fought with his father who defended the city of Saint-Omer against the assaults of Robert III of Artois. In 1346, he participated in the siege of Aiguillon, led by John, Duke of Normandy (the future John II of France). It was during this siege that he died, after falling from his horse. [2]

His widow Joan remarried in 1349, her second husband being King John II of France. Since Philip had no other sons from his marriage to Joan, the future of the House of Burgundy was then placed in the hands of his young son Philip (1346–61), who died childless. [3] After the death of the younger Philip, the dukedom of Burgundy became a part of the French crown, [3] and was granted by John II of France to his youngest son (and the previous Duke’s stepbrother), Philip the Bold. [4]

His daughter, Joan (1344 11 September 1360), was betrothed to Amadeus VI, Count of Savoy from 1347 to 1355, and was raised at his court. When she was released from the engagement at age 10, she entered a convent at Poissy, where she remained for her final years. [5]

Ancestry

Notes

  1. Cox 1967, p. 60.
  2. Jean Le Bel, 209.
  3. 1 2 W. Mark Ormrod, Edward III, (Yale University Press, 2011), 417.
  4. Richard Vaughan, Philip the Bold: The Formation of the Burgundian State, Vol. 1, (The Boydell Press, 2005), 152.
  5. Cox 1967, p. 60-61,105.

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References


Regnal titles
Preceded by
Joan I
as sole ruler
Count of Boulogne and Auvergne
with Joan I

1338–1346
Succeeded by
Joan I
as sole ruler

See also