Philip Jones of Fonmon

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Colonel Philip Jones (1618 – 5 September 1674) was a Welsh military leader and politician who sat in the House of Commons between 1650 and 1656. He rose to the rank of Colonel in the service of the Parliamentary Army under Fairfax during the English Civil War. As Governor of Swansea he successfully held the town against the Royalist forces.

Wales Country in northwest Europe, part of the United Kingdom

Wales is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It is bordered by England to the east, the Irish Sea to the north and west, and the Bristol Channel to the south. It had a population in 2011 of 3,063,456 and has a total area of 20,779 km2 (8,023 sq mi). Wales has over 1,680 miles (2,700 km) of coastline and is largely mountainous with its higher peaks in the north and central areas, including Snowdon, its highest summit. The country lies within the north temperate zone and has a changeable, maritime climate.

House of Commons of England parliament of England up to 1707

The House of Commons of England was the lower house of the Parliament of England from its development in the 14th century to the union of England and Scotland in 1707, when it was replaced by the House of Commons of Great Britain. In 1801, with the union of Great Britain and Ireland, that house was in turn replaced by the House of Commons of the United Kingdom.

Roundhead Name given to the supporters of the Parliament during the English Civil War

Roundheads were the supporters of the Parliament of England during the English Civil War (1641–1652). Also known as Parliamentarians, they fought against King Charles I of England and his supporters, known as the Cavaliers or Royalists, who claimed rule by absolute monarchy and the principle of the 'divine right of kings'. The goal of the Roundhead party was to give the Parliament supreme control over executive administration of the country/kingdom.

Contents

Biography

Jones was born at the Great House Swansea, the son of David Johns of Swansea and Penywaun Llangyfelach. He became Parliamentarian governor of Swansea on 17 November 1645 and was governor of Cardiff by 1649. In 1646 he was a colonel in the Parliamentary army. [1]

In 1650, Jones was elected Member of Parliament for Breconshire in the Rump Parliament and sat until 1653.[ citation needed ] He was a member of the Council of State and was nominated as representative for Monmouthshire in the Barebones Parliament. [2] [3] In 1654, he was elected MP for Monmouthshire and Glamorgan and chose to sit for Glamorgan. [4] In 1656 he was elected MP for Glamorgan and Breconshire, and chose to sit for Glamorgan. [5] [6]

Breconshire or Brecknockshire was a constituency in Wales which returned one Member of Parliament to the House of Commons of the English Parliament, and later to the Parliament of Great Britain and of the United Kingdom, between 1542 and 1918.

Rump Parliament political body in the time of the English Revolution

The Rump Parliament was the English Parliament after Colonel Thomas Pride purged the Long Parliament, on 6 December 1648, of those members hostile to the Grandees' intention to try King Charles I for high treason.

Fonmon Castle Fonmon Castle.jpg
Fonmon Castle

In 1654, he bought Fonmon Castle from the St. John family, who had become obliged to sell, as well as numerous other estates. He became comptroller of Oliver Cromwell's household, In addition, he was appointed a Privy Councillor and sat in Cromwell's Upper House as Philip Lord Jones on 10 December 1657. He superintended the funeral of Oliver Cromwell on 23 November 1658. He was governor of Charterhouse in 1658. In 1659 he commanded the militia in Cardiff Castle 1659. [1]

Fonmon Castle castle near Fonmon, Vale of Glamorgan, Wales

Fonmon Castle is a fortified medieval castle near the village of Fonmon in the Vale of Glamorgan and a Grade I listed building. With its origins rooted in the 12th century it is today seen as a great architectural rarity, as it is one of few buildings that was drastically remodeled in the 18th century, but not Gothicized. The castle is believed to have remained under the ownership of just two families throughout its history; from Norman times, it was owned by the St Johns, and from 1656, by the descendants of Colonel Philip Jones.

Oliver Cromwell 17th-century English military and political leader

Oliver Cromwell was an English military and political leader. He served as Lord Protector of the Commonwealth of England, Scotland, and Ireland "and of the dominions thereto belonging" from 1653 until his death, acting simultaneously as head of state and head of government of the new republic.

On the Restoration, he was confirmed as Custos Rotulorum and was High Sheriff of Glamorgan in 1671. Jones died at Fonmon aged 56 and was buried in Penmark Church. [1]

This page is a list of High Sheriffs of Glamorgan. Sheriffs of Glamorgan served under and were answerable to the independent Lords of Glamorgan until that lordship was merged into the crown. This is in contrast to sheriffs of the English shires who were from the earliest times officers of the crown. Sheriffs in the modern sense, appointed and answerable to the crown, were instituted in the county of Glamorgan in 1541.

Pembrokeshire aside, most of South Wales had been staunchly Royalist prior to the civil war, and in the resulting power vacuum, Jones was able to rise from comparatively humble beginnings to a position of considerable wealth through purchases and awards of land. From pre-war yeoman's earnings, he ended his life with a four figure income – fabulous riches for those days. Even before the Restoration of the Monarchy, there were calls for Jones's trial from the Royalists who had forfeited their lands to him. With Charles II in place, Jones was finally brought to trial in 1661 for having carried away the organ of St. Mary's Swansea, a charge he survived to die in his bed.

Pembrokeshire principal area and historic county in south-west Wales

Pembrokeshire is a county in the southwest of Wales. It is bordered by Carmarthenshire to the east, Ceredigion to the northeast, and the sea everywhere else.

South Wales Region of Wales

South Wales is a loosely defined region of Wales bordered by England and the Bristol Channel to the east and south. It has a population of around 2.2 million, almost three-quarters of the whole of Wales, including 400,000 in Cardiff, 250,000 in Swansea and 150,000 in Newport. Generally considered to include the historic counties of Glamorgan and Monmouthshire, South Wales extends westwards to include Carmarthenshire and Pembrokeshire. In the western extent, from Swansea westwards, local people would probably recognise that they lived in both south Wales and west Wales. The Brecon Beacons National Park covers about a third of South Wales, containing Pen y Fan, the highest British mountain south of Cadair Idris in Snowdonia.

Yeoman member of a social class in England and the United States

A yeoman was a member of a social class in England and the United States. It is also a military term.

Family

Jones married a daughter of William Price of Gellihir in 1642. [1] He had a son Oliver, and a grandson Robert, who was also an MP. [2] [7]

Notes

  1. 1 2 3 4 Williams 1895, p. 98.
  2. 1 2 Hayton 2002.
  3. Willis 1750, p. 256.
  4. Willis 1750, pp. 263, 268.
  5. Willis 1750, pp. 280, 281.
  6. Williams 1895, p. 97.
  7. Nicholas 1991, p. 632.

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