Philip of Artois, Count of Eu

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Philip of Artois
Count of Eu
Hilip of Artois, Count of Eu.jpg
Wedding of Philip of Artois and Marie of Auvergne
Born1358
Died(1397-06-16)16 June 1397
Micalizo
Noble family Artois
Spouse(s)
(m. 1393)
Issue
Father John of Artois, Count of Eu
MotherIsabeau of Melun

Philip of Artois (1358 16 June 1397, Micalizo), son of John of Artois, Count of Eu, and Isabeau of Melun, [1] was Count of Eu from 1387 until his death, succeeding his brother Robert.

Philip was a gallant and energetic soldier. In 1383, he captured the town of Bourbourg from the English. He went on a pilgrimage to the Holy Land, and was imprisoned there by Barquq, the Sultan of Egypt, being released through the mediation of Jean Boucicaut and the Venetians. In 1390, he joined the unsuccessful expedition of Louis II, Duke of Bourbon, against Mahdia. In 1392, he was created Constable of France.

On 27 January 1393 he married Marie (13671434), daughter of John, Duke of Berry. [2] They had four children:

As a prominent Crusader, he was one of the French contingent sent to take part in the Battle of Nicopolis. He was captured in the battle, and subsequently died in captivity. [1]

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References

  1. 1 2 Wilson 1984, p. 360.
  2. McLeod 1970, p. xix.
  3. Vaughan 2010, p. xviii.

Sources

Philip of Artois, Count of Eu
Born: 1358 Died: 16 June 1397
Preceded by
Robert
Count of Eu
13871397
Succeeded by
Charles