Philippa of Luxembourg

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Philippa of Luxembourg

MelisStokeAanHetHofVanGraafJanII.jpg

Melis Stoke at the court of count John II of Avesnes, count of Holland and Zeeland.
Born 1252
Died 6 April 1311 (aged 5859)
Noble family Luxembourg
Spouse(s) John II, Count of Holland
Father Henry V of Luxembourg
Mother Marguerite of Bar

Philippa of Luxembourg (1252 – 6 April 1311) was the daughter of Count Henry V of Luxembourg and his wife, Marguerite of Bar. She married John II, Count of Holland. [1] Two of her granddaughters were Philippa of Hainault, Queen consort of England, and Margaret II, Countess of Hainault in her own right and wife of Holy Roman Emperor Louis IV.

Margaret of Bar Countess consort of Luxembourg

Margaret of Bar (1220–1275) was a daughter of Henry II of Bar and his wife Philippa of Dreux. She was Countess of Luxembourg by her marriage to Henry V of Luxembourg. She is also known as Marguerite of Bar.

John II, Count of Holland Count of Hainaut and Count of Holland and Zeeland

John II of Avesnes was Count of Hainaut, Holland, and Zeeland.

Philippa of Hainault 14th-century noblewoman and queen of England

Philippa of Hainault was Queen of England as the wife of King Edward III. Edward promised in 1326 to marry her within the following two years. She was married to Edward, first by proxy, when Edward dispatched the Bishop of Coventry "to marry her in his name" in Valenciennes in October 1327. The marriage was celebrated formally in York Minster on 24 January 1328, some months after Edward's accession to the throne of England. In August 1328, he also fixed his wife's dower.

The children of John II of Holland and Philippa of Luxembourg included:

Cambrai Subprefecture and commune in Hauts-de-France, France

Cambrai is a commune in the Nord department and in the Hauts-de-France region of France on the Scheldt river, which is known locally as the Escaut river.

William I, Count of Hainaut Count of Holland, Zeeland and Hainaut

William I, Count of Hainaut, was Count William III of Avesnes, Count William III of Holland and Count William II of Zeeland from 1304 to his death.

John of Beaumont was a younger brother of count William III of Holland. Seigneur of Beaumont and Count of Soissons by virtue of his marriage.

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Margaret II, Countess of Hainaut Countess suo jure of Holland, Zeeland and Hainaut

Margaret II of Avesnes was Countess of Hainaut and Countess of Holland from 1345 to 1356. She was Holy Roman Empress and Queen of Germany by marriage to Emperor Louis IV the Bavarian.

Marguerite of France may refer to:

Avesnes family noble family

The Avesnes family played an important role during the Middle Ages. The family has its roots in the small village Avesnes-sur-Helpe, in the north of France.

Mary of Avesnes Duchess of Bourbon, Countess of La Marche and Clermont-en-Beauvaisis

Marie of Hainaut (1280–1354) was the daughter of John II, Count of Holland and Philippa of Luxembourg, her brother was William I, Count of Hainaut.

Margaret of Baux was a Countess of Saint-Pol, of Brienne, and of Conversano. She was a member of the noble House of Baux of the Kingdom of Naples, which had its origins in Provence dating back to the 11th century. Her husband was Peter of Luxembourg, Count of Saint-Pol, of Brienne, and of Conversano. Margaret's descendants include English Queen Consort Elizabeth Woodville, King Henry IV of France, Mary, Queen of Scots, and all English monarchs after 1509.

Jeanne of Bar, Countess of Marle and Soissons Midieval countess

Jeanne de Bar, suo jure Countess of Marle and Soissons, Dame d'Oisy, Viscountess of Meaux, and Countess of Saint-Pol, of Brienne, de Ligny, and Conversano was a noble French heiress and Sovereign Countess. She was the only child of Robert of Bar, Count of Marle and Soissons, Sire d'Oisy, who was killed at the Battle of Agincourt when she was a baby, leaving her the sole heiress to his titles and estates. In 1430, at the age of fifteen, Jeanne was one of the three women placed in charge of Joan of Arc when the latter was a prisoner in the castle of John II of Luxembourg, Count of Ligny, Jeanne's stepfather.

Margaret of Savoy, Countess of Saint-Pol Princess of Savoy

Margaret of Savoy, also known as Marguerite de Savoie or Margherita di Savoia, was the eldest surviving daughter of Louis I, Duke of Savoy. She was the wife of Margrave John IV of Montferrat, and later the wife of Peter II of Luxembourg, Count of Saint-Pol, of Brienne, Marle, and Soissons. Margaret's numerous descendants included Mary, Queen of Scots and King Henry IV of France.

Marguerite d'Enghien, suo jure Countess of Brienne and of Conversano, suo jure Heiress of Enghien, and Lady of Beauvois, was a wealthy noblewoman from the County of Hainaut in her own right, having inherited the counties of Brienne and of Conversano, and the Lordship of Enghien from her father Louis of Enghien on 17 March 1394. She was the wife of John of Luxembourg, Sire of Beauvois and the mother of Peter of Luxembourg, Count of Saint-Pol, Count of Brienne and of Conversano who inherited her fiefs, and John II of Luxembourg, Count of Ligny.

Peter of Luxembourg was a son of John of Luxembourg, Lord of Beauvoir, and his wife Marguerite of Enghien. His inheritance included the counties of Brienne, Conversano and Saint-Pol.

Margaret, Countess of Vertus French countess

Margaret, Countess of Vertus, was a French vassal, Countess of Vertus and Etampes 1420–1466. She was the daughter of Louis I, Duke of Orléans, and Valentina Visconti.

Mathilde was the fourth child and daughter of Mathilde of Flanders and Henry I, Duke of Brabant. She married Henry II, Count Palatine of the Rhine in Aachen in 1212 and later married Floris IV, Count of Holland on 6 December 1224. Mathilde was a great-great-grandmother of Philippa of Hainault, wife of King Edward III of England and Queen consort, as well as being a great-granddaughter of King Stephen of England.

The Dampierre family played an important role during the Middle Ages. Named after Dampierre, in the Champagne region, where members first became prominent, members of the family were later Count of Flanders, Count of Nevers, Counts and Dukes of Rethel, Count of Artois and Count of Franche-Comté.

Alice of Hainault, Countess Marshal, was the daughter of John de Avenes, Count of Hainault, and Philippine, daughter of the Count of Luxembourg. She was the second wife of Roger Bigod, 5th Earl of Norfolk, Earl Marshal of England.

Henry V, Count of Luxembourg Count of Luxembourg

Henry V the Blondell, called the Great, was the count of Arlon from 1226 to his death, lord of Ligny from 1240 to his death, count of Luxembourg and Laroche from 1247 to his death, and the count of Namur between 1256 and 1264 as Henry III. He was the son and successor of Waleran III of Limburg and Ermesinda of Luxembourg.

Joan was the Countess of Chiny. Joan was the daughter of Louis IV, Count of Chiny, and Matilda of Avesnes, and became ruler of the county upon her father’s death on 7 October 1226. She married Arnold IV, Count of Loon, son of Gerard III, Count of Rieneck, and Kunigunde von Zimmern, in 1228, whereupon he assumed the role of Count of Chiny.

References

  1. M. A. Pollock, Scotland, England and France After the Loss of Normandy, 1204-1296, (The Boydell Press, 2015), xv.