Phyllodulcin

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Phyllodulcin
Phyllodulcin.svg
Names
IUPAC name
(3R)-8-hydroxy-3-(3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)-3,4-dihydroisochromen-1-one
Other names
Praeruptorin
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
PubChem CID
UNII
Properties
C16H14O5
Molar mass 286.27 g/mol
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Infobox references

Phyllodulcin is a dihydroisocoumarin found in Hydrangea macrophylla [1] and Hydrangea serrata . [2] It is a sweetener 400-800 times sweeter than sugar. [3]

Contents

See also

Related Research Articles

<i>Hydrangea</i> genus of flowering plants in the family Hydrangeaceae

Hydrangea is a genus of 70–75 species of flowering plants native to Asia and the Americas. By far the greatest species diversity is in eastern Asia, notably Korea, China, and Japan. Most are shrubs 1 to 3 meters tall, but some are small trees, and others lianas reaching up to 30 m (98 ft) by climbing up trees. They can be either deciduous or evergreen, though the widely cultivated temperate species are all deciduous.

A pH indicator is a halochromic chemical compound added in small amounts to a solution so the pH (acidity or basicity) of the solution can be determined visually. Hence, a pH indicator is a chemical detector for hydronium ions (H3O+) or hydrogen ions (H+) in the Arrhenius model. Normally, the indicator causes the color of the solution to change depending on the pH. Indicators can also show change in other physical properties; for example, olfactory indicators show change in their odor. The pH value of a neutral solution is 7.0 at 25°C (standard laboratory conditions). Solutions with a pH value below 7.0 are considered acidic and solutions with pH value above 7.0 are basic (alkaline). As most naturally occurring organic compounds are weak protolytes, carboxylic acids and amines, pH indicators find many applications in biology and analytical chemistry. Moreover, pH indicators form one of the three main types of indicator compounds used in chemical analysis. For the quantitative analysis of metal cations, the use of complexometric indicators is preferred, whereas the third compound class, the redox indicators, are used in titrations involving a redox reaction as the basis of the analysis.

The University of Delaware Botanic Gardens are botanical gardens and an arboretum located on the campus of the University of Delaware, in Newark, Delaware, United States. The gardens are open to the public without charge.

<i>Hydrangea macrophylla</i> species of plant

Hydrangea macrophylla is a species of flowering plant in the family Hydrangeaceae, native to Japan. It is a deciduous shrub growing to 2 m (7 ft) tall by 2.5 m (8 ft) broad with large heads of pink or blue flowers in summer and autumn. Common names include bigleaf hydrangea, French hydrangea, lacecap hydrangea, mophead hydrangea, penny mac and hortensia. It is widely cultivated in many parts of the world in many climates. It is not to be confused with H. aspera 'Macrophylla'.

<i>Hydrangea quercifolia</i> species of plant

Hydrangea quercifolia, commonly known by its translation oakleaf hydrangea or oak-leaved hydrangea, is a species of flowering plant native to the Southeastern United States, in woodland habitats from North Carolina west to Tennessee, and south to Florida and Louisiana. A deciduous shrub with white showy flower heads, it is a commonly grown garden plant. Numerous cultivars are available commercially.

<i>Hydrangea aspera</i> species of plant

Hydrangea aspera is a species of flowering plant in the family Hydrangaceae, native to the region between the Himalayas, across southern China, to Taiwan. It is a large, erect deciduous shrub growing to 3 m (10 ft) tall and wide, with broadly oval leaves. The flowers are typically borne in large flat heads in late summer, and are in variable shades of pale blue and pink, fringed by white or pale pink sterile florets.

<i>Hydrangea serrata</i> species of plant

Hydrangea serrata is a species of flowering plant in the family Hydrangeaceae, native to mountainous regions of Korea and Japan. Common names include mountain hydrangea and tea of heaven. Growing to 1.2 m (4 ft) tall and broad, it is a deciduous shrub with oval leaves and panicles of blue and pink flowers in summer and autumn (fall). It is widely cultivated as an attractive ornamental shrub throughout the world in areas with suitable climate and soil.

<i>Hydrangea hirta</i> species of plant

Hydrangea hirta that is commonly known as the "nettle-leaved hydrangea" is an endemic species that is native to Japan with ranges from its native country to East Asia. Within the conservation levels this species fits into species the least concerned category. Due to the beauty and sturdiness of the species flowers it can be found outside of its range due to being used for horticultural and landscaping purposes,and is found in gardens and landscapes in a wide variety of countries including the United Kingdom and the Eastern United States. As well as being a beautiful landscaping species for businesses and residential gardens alike, this species have been used in a wide array of research projects and studies that have been conducted at a variety of Universities in countries around the world including Japan, the United Kingdom, and the United States to name a few.

Hydrangenol chemical compound

Hydrangenol is a dihydroisocoumarin. It can be found in Hydrangea macrophylla, as well as its 8-O-glucoside. (-)-hydrangenol 4'-O-glucoside and (+)-hydrangenol 4'-O-glucoside can be found in Hydrangeae Dulcis Folium, the processed leaves of H. macrophylla var. thunbergii.

Thunberginol A chemical compound

Thunberginol A is an isocoumarin found in Hydrangea macrophylla and the herbal preparation hydrangeae dulcis folium which is produced from its leaves.

Thunberginol B chemical compound

Thunberginol B is an isocoumarin found in Hydrangeae Dulcis Folium, the processed leaves of Hydrangea macrophylla var. thunbergii.

Thunberginol C chemical compound

Thunberginol C is a dihydroisocoumarin found in Hydrangeae Dulcis Folium, the processed leaves of Hydrangea macrophylla var. thunbergii.

Thunberginol D chemical compound

Thunberginol D is a dihydroisocoumarin found in Hydrangeae Dulcis Folium, the processed leaves of Hydrangea macrophylla var. thunbergii.

Thunberginol E chemical compound

Thunberginol E is a dihydroisocoumarin found in Hydrangeae Dulcis Folium, the processed leaves of Hydrangea macrophylla var. thunbergii.

Thunberginol F chemical compound

Thunberginol F is a phthalide found in Hydrangea macrophylla.

Thunberginol G chemical compound

Thunberginol G is a dihydroisocoumarin found in Hydrangeae Dulcis Folium, the processed leaves of Hydrangea macrophylla var. thunbergii.

3,4′-Dihydroxystilbene chemical compound

3,4′-Dihydroxystilbene is a stilbenoid found in the roots of Hydrangea macrophylla.

Hydrangeic acid chemical compound

Hydrangeic acid is a stilbenoid found in the leaves of Hydrangea macrophylla.

Amacha is a Japanese herbal tea made from fermented leaves of Hydrangea macrophylla var. thunbergii. The name derives from the characters for sweet and tea.

<i>Hemerocallis hakuunensis</i> species of plant

Hemerocallis hakuunensis, known as Baekunsan daylily, is a species in the family Asphodelaceae, native to Korea.

References

  1. Effects of phyllodulcin, hydrangenol, and their 8-O-glucosides, and Thunberginols A and F from Hydrangea macrophylla SERINGE var. thunbergii MAKINO on passive cutaneous anaphylaxis reaction in rats. Matsuda H., Shimoda H., Yamahara J. and Yoshikawa M., Biological & pharmaceutical bulletin, 1999, vol. 22, no8, pp. 870-872, INIST : 1959604
  2. Accumulation of phyllodulcin in sweet-leaf plants of Hydrangea serrata and its neutrality in the defence against a specialist leafmining herbivore. Mami Ujihara, Masateru Shinozaki and Makoto Kato, Researches on population ecology, Volume 37, Number 2, pp. 249-257, doi : 10.1007/BF02515827
  3. Chemical and Functional Properties of Food Saccharides. P. Tomasik, CRC Press, Boca Raton, 2003 , ISBN   978-0-8493-1486-5