Pierre de Ruel, marquis de Beurnonville

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Pierre de Ruel, marquis de Beurnonville Pierre Riel - marquis de Beurnonville.jpg
Pierre de Ruel, marquis de Beurnonville
Felicite-Louise-Julie-Constance de Durfort, by Merry-Joseph Blondel, second wife to Pierre de Ruel. Merry-Joseph Blondel - Felicite-Louise-Julie-Constance de Durfort.jpg
Felicite-Louise-Julie-Constance de Durfort, by Merry-Joseph Blondel, second wife to Pierre de Ruel.

Pierre de Ruel, marquis de Beurnonville (10 May 1752 – 23 April 1821) was a French general during the French Revolutionary Wars and later a marshal of France [1] and Deputy Grand Master of Grand Orient de France. [2] [3]

French Revolutionary Wars series of conflicts fought between the French Republic and several European monarchies from 1792 to 1802

The French Revolutionary Wars were a series of sweeping military conflicts lasting from 1792 until 1802 and resulting from the French Revolution. They pitted France against Great Britain, Austria, Prussia, Russia and several other monarchies. They are divided in two periods: the War of the First Coalition (1792–97) and the War of the Second Coalition (1798–1802). Initially confined to Europe, the fighting gradually assumed a global dimension. After a decade of constant warfare and aggressive diplomacy, France had conquered a wide array of territories, from the Italian Peninsula and the Low Countries in Europe to the Louisiana Territory in North America. French success in these conflicts ensured the spread of revolutionary principles over much of Europe.

Grand Orient de France largest of several Masonic organizations in France and the oldest in Continental Europe

The Grand Orient de France (GODF) is the largest of several Masonic organizations in France and is the oldest in Continental Europe. It is generally considered to be the mother lodge of traditional Liberal, or Continental Freemasonry.

Contents

Biography

Bournonville was born at Champignol-lez-Mondeville, Aube.[ citation needed ]

Champignol-lez-Mondeville Commune in Grand Est, France

Champignol-lez-Mondeville is a commune in the Aube department in north-central France.

Aube Department of France

Aube is a French department in the Grand Est region of north-eastern France. As with sixty departments in France, this department is named after a river: the Aube. With 305,606 inhabitants (2012), Aube is 76th department in terms of population. The inhabitants of the department are known as Aubois or Auboises

After service in the colonies, he married a wealthy Creole, Geneviève Gillot L'Étang. After his return to France, he purchased the post of lieutenant of the Swiss Guard of the count of Provence. [1]

France Republic with mainland in Europe and numerous oversea territories

France, officially the French Republic, is a country whose territory consists of metropolitan France in Western Europe and several overseas regions and territories. The metropolitan area of France extends from the Mediterranean Sea to the English Channel and the North Sea, and from the Rhine to the Atlantic Ocean. It is bordered by Belgium, Luxembourg and Germany to the northeast, Switzerland and Italy to the east, and Andorra and Spain to the south. The overseas territories include French Guiana in South America and several islands in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans. The country's 18 integral regions span a combined area of 643,801 square kilometres (248,573 sq mi) and a total population of 67.3 million. France, a sovereign state, is a unitary semi-presidential republic with its capital in Paris, the country's largest city and main cultural and commercial centre. Other major urban areas include Lyon, Marseille, Toulouse, Bordeaux, Lille and Nice.

During the French Revolution he was named lieutenant-general, and took an active part in the battles of Valmy and Jemmapes. [4] Minister of War in February 1793, he denounced his old commander, Charles François Dumouriez, to the Convention, and was one of the four deputies sent to watch him. [1]

Battle of Valmy victory by the army of France during the Revolutionary Wars that followed to Sheila the French Revolution

The Battle of Valmy was the first major victory by the army of France during the Revolutionary Wars that followed the French Revolution. The action took place on 20 September 1792 as Prussian troops commanded by the Duke of Brunswick attempted to march on Paris. Generals François Kellermann and Charles Dumouriez stopped the advance near the northern village of Valmy in Champagne-Ardenne.

Charles François Dumouriez French general

Charles-François du Périer Dumouriez was a French general during the French Revolutionary Wars. He shared the victory at Valmy with General François Christophe Kellermann, but later deserted the Revolutionary Army, and became a royalist intriguer during the reign of Napoleon as well as an adviser to the British government. Dumouriez is one of the names inscribed under the Arc de Triomphe, on Column 3.

Handed over by Dumouriez to the Austrians on 3 April 1793, Beurnonville was not exchanged until November 1795. He entered the service again, commanded the Army of Sambre-et-Meuse and Army of the North, and was appointed inspector of infantry of the Army of England in 1798. He was sent as ambassador to Berlin in 1800, and to Madrid in 1802. [1]

England Country in north-west Europe, part of the United Kingdom

England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Wales to the west and Scotland to the north-northwest. The Irish Sea lies west of England and the Celtic Sea lies to the southwest. England is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain, which lies in the North Atlantic, and includes over 100 smaller islands, such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight.

Berlin Capital of Germany

Berlin is the capital and largest city of Germany by both area and population. Its 3,748,148 (2018) inhabitants make it the second most populous city proper of the European Union after London. The city is one of Germany's 16 federal states. It is surrounded by the state of Brandenburg, and contiguous with its capital, Potsdam. The two cities are at the center of the Berlin-Brandenburg capital region, which is, with about six million inhabitants and an area of more than 30,000 km², Germany's third-largest metropolitan region after the Rhine-Ruhr and Rhine-Main regions.

Madrid Capital of Spain

Madrid is the capital of Spain and the largest municipality in both the Community of Madrid and Spain as a whole. The city has almost 3.3 million inhabitants and a metropolitan area population of approximately 6.5 million. It is the third-largest city in the European Union (EU), smaller than only London and Berlin, and its monocentric metropolitan area is the third-largest in the EU, smaller only than those of London and Paris. The municipality covers 604.3 km2 (233.3 sq mi).

Napoleon made him a senator and count of the empire. In 1814 he was a member of the provisional government organized after the abdication of Napoleon. He followed Louis XVIII to exile in Ghent, and after the second restoration was made marquis and marshal of France (1816). [1]

Louis XVIII of France Bourbon King of France and of Navarre

Louis XVIII, known as "the Desired", was a monarch of the House of Bourbon who ruled as King of France from 1814 to 1824, except for a period in 1815 known as the Hundred Days. He spent twenty-three years in exile, from 1791 to 1814, during the French Revolution and the First French Empire, and again in 1815, during the period of the Hundred Days, upon the return of Napoleon I from Elba.

Ghent Municipality in Flemish Community, Belgium

Ghent is a city and a municipality in the Flemish Region of Belgium. It is the capital and largest city of the East Flanders province, and the second largest municipality in Belgium, after Antwerp. The city originally started as a settlement at the confluence of the Rivers Scheldt and Leie and in the Late Middle Ages became one of the largest and richest cities of northern Europe, with some 50,000 people in 1300. It is a port and university city.

Notes

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 Chisholm 1911, p. 834.
  2. Jean-Claude Rochigneux, Maçons d'hier, maçonnerie d'aujourd'hui, Humanisme, Conform éditions, 2003, p. 39.
  3. Dictionnaire de la Franc-maçonnerie, page 138 (Daniel Ligou, Presses universitaires de France, 2006)
  4. Smith 1998, p. 30.
Dumouriez arresting the Commissioners in 1793 Dumouriez arresting the Commissioners.jpeg
Dumouriez arresting the Commissioners in 1793

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References

Attribution
Political offices
Preceded by
Jean-Nicolas Pache
French Minister of War
4 February 1793 – 1 April 1793
Succeeded by
Pierre Henri Hélène Marie Lebrun-Tondu
Military offices
Preceded by
Étienne Deprez-Crassier
Commander-in-chief of the Army of the Moselle
15 November 1792 – 23 January 1793
Succeeded by
René Charles de Ligniville
Preceded by
Joseph Souham
Commander-in-chief of the Army of the North
4 April – 15 September 1796
Succeeded by
Jean François Aimé Dejean
Preceded by
Jean-Baptiste Jourdan
Commander-in-chief of the Army of Sambre-et-Meuse
23 September 1796 – 23 January 1797
Succeeded by
Jean Étienne Championnet
Preceded by
Jean François Aimé Dejean
Commander-in-chief of the Army of the North
25 September 1797 – 2 January 1798
Succeeded by
Jacques MacDonald

Source:Clerget, Charles (1905). Tableaux des Armées Françaises pendant les Guerres de la Révolution. Paris: Librarie Militaire R. Chapelot et Cie. Retrieved 3 July 2015.