Pietroasele

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Pietroasele
Pietroasele jud Buzau.png
Location in Buzău County
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Pietroasele
Location in Romania
Coordinates: 45°06′N26°34′E / 45.100°N 26.567°E / 45.100; 26.567 Coordinates: 45°06′N26°34′E / 45.100°N 26.567°E / 45.100; 26.567
CountryFlag of Romania.svg  Romania
County Buzău
SubdivisionsCâlțești, Clondiru de Sus, Dara, Pietroasa Mică, Pietroasele, Șarânga
Government
  MayorCornel Enache [1] (PSD)
Population
 (2011) [2]
3,301
Time zone EET/EEST (UTC+2/+3)
Vehicle reg. BZ
Website www.pietroasele.ro

Pietroasele is a commune in Buzău County, Muntenia, Romania, known for its vineyards. The name means "the rockies". The commune is composed of six villages: Câlțești, Clondiru de Sus, Dara, Pietroasa Mică, Pietroasele and Șarânga. It became famous with the discovery in 1837 of the Pietroasa Treasure composed of several pieces of gold and precious stones. The Romanian historian Alexandru Odobescu wrote a book on the archaeological discovery.

Contents

The village is the centre of several archaeological sites such as the Dacian fortress at Dari Gruiu. The six locations that make up the commune were built after the sixteenth century, on the lands of freeholders and lords of the neighbouring village of Bădeni, and were later divided into three municipalities: Pietroasa de Jos, Pietroasa de Sus and Șarânga, which were merged in 1968.

Although it was initially a centre for stone extraction, today viticulture is the main economic sector of the village, known for Romanian wine. The Viticulture Research Center found here is managed by the University of Agricultural Sciences in Bucharest.

History

A Dacian fortress is located at 1,5 km north of Pietroasa Mică village. [3]

Ruins of the Roman thermae at Pietroasele near county road. Pietroasele thaermae 01.jpg
Ruins of the Roman thermae at Pietroasele near county road.

Ruins of a third-fourth century AD Roman castra and thermae were discovered in the area in the 1980s. The Roman fort of Pietroasa de Jos, well beyond the Danubian Limes and near present-day Moldavia, would seem to have been occupied in the fourth century A.D. It was connected to bridge-head forts (Sucidava, [4] castra of Tirighina-Bărboși, and the unlocated Constantiniana Daphne) along the left bank of the Danube river.

Near this Roman fort, built by Constantine I when he created the Constantine Wall of the Limes Moesiae probably around 330 AD, researchers have found even a small thermae building in the 1980s. [5] The Roman fortification (124 m x 158 m) was built in an area where was present the Culture of Pietroasa. [6] The wall was 2.7 meters thick. Some stamped bricks of XI Claudia Pia Fidelis from Durostorum, specific to Traian ages, were discovered. Bricks stamps with LEG XI CL ANT and LEG XI CPF. [7] Nowadays there is a small museum on the former site of the castrum.

The nearly 4000 people living in Pietroasele live mainly of agriculture and farming, but a few are employed in tourism related to the Roman discoveries and museum.

Petroassa treasure

Ruins of the Roman thermae in Pietroasele. RO BZ Pietroasele thermae 1.jpg
Ruins of the Roman thermae in Pietroasele.

The Pietroasele treasure, an Ostrogothic hoard uncovered in 1837 by local villagers, is on display at the National Museum of Romanian History, in Bucharest. The original gold hoard, discovered within a large ring barrow known as "Istrița hill" near Pietroasele, is a late fourth-century Gothic treasure that included some twenty-two objects of gold, among the most famous examples of the polychrome style of Migration Period art. The total weight of the find was approximately 20 kilograms (44 lb).

Of the twenty-two pieces, only twelve have survived, conserved at the National Museum of Romanian History, in Bucharest: a large eagle-headed fibula and three smaller ones encrusted with semi-precious stones; a patera, or round sacrificial dish, modelled with Orphic figures [8] surrounding a seated three-dimensional goddess in the centre; a twelve-sided cup, a ring with a Gothic runic inscription, a large tray, two other necklaces and a pitcher.

Two of the targets are classified as monuments of architecture, both in the village of Pietroasele: a stone fountain dating from 1892 and a viticulture research station built in 1893. Three objects are considered tombstones or memorials: Crucea Frumoasă (Beautiful Cross), dating from the 19th century, Stan Avram and Ion Lemnaru (1841) from Pietroasa Minor.

See also

Related Research Articles

Dacia Balkan kingdom of the Dacians (168 BC–106 AD)

Dacia was the land inhabited by the Dacians. The Greeks referred to them as the Getae and the Romans called them Daci.

Novae (fortress)

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Oescus

Oescus, Palatiolon or Palatiolum was an ancient town along the Danube river, in Moesia, northwest of the modern Bulgarian city of Pleven, near the village of Gigen. It is a Daco-Moesian toponym. Ptolemy calls it a Triballian town, but it later became Roman. For a short time, it was linked by a bridge with the ancient city of Sucidava. The city seems to have at one point reached a size of 280,000 m² and a population of 100,000.

National Museum of Romanian History

The National Museum of Romanian History is a museum located on the Calea Victoriei in Bucharest, Romania, which contains Romanian historical artifacts from prehistoric times up to modern times.

Trajans Wall

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Porolissum

Porolissum was an ancient Roman city in Dacia. Established as a military camp in 106 during Trajan's Dacian Wars, the city quickly grew through trade with the native Dacians and became the capital of the province Dacia Porolissensis in 124. The site is one of the largest and best-preserved archaeological sites in modern-day Romania. It is 8 km away from the modern city of Zalău, in Moigrad-Porolissum village, Mirsid Commune, Sălaj County.

Ring of Pietroassa

The Ring of Pietroassa or Buzău torc is a gold torc-like necklace found in a ring barrow in Pietroassa, Buzău County, southern Romania, in 1837. It formed part of a large gold hoard dated to between 250 and 400 CE. The ring itself is generally assumed to be of Roman-Mediterranean origin, and features a Gothic language inscription in the Elder Futhark runic alphabet.

Sucidava Dacian and Daco-Roman historical site in Corabia, Romania

Sucidava is a Dacian and Daco-Roman historical site, situated in Corabia, Romania, on the north bank of the Danube. The first Christian Basilica established in Romania can be found there and the foot of a Roman bridge over the Danube built by Constantine the Great to link Sucidava with Oescus, in order to start the reconquest of Dacia. There is also a secret underground fountain which flows under the walls of the town to a water spring situated outside.

Pietroasele Treasure Gothic treasure

The Pietroasele Treasure found in Pietroasele, Buzău, Romania, in 1837, is a late fourth-century Gothic treasure that included some twenty-two objects of gold, among the most famous examples of the polychrome style of Migration Period art. Of the twenty-two pieces, only twelve have survived, conserved at the National Museum of Romanian History, in Bucharest: a large eagle-headed fibula and three smaller ones encrusted with semi-precious stones; a patera, or round sacrificial dish, modelled with Orphic figures surrounding a seated three-dimensional goddess in the center; a twelve-sided cup, a ring with a Gothic runic inscription, a large tray, two other necklaces and a pitcher. Their multiple styles, in which Han Chinese styles have been noted in the belt buckles, Hellenistic styles in the golden bowls, Sasanian motifs in the baskets, and Germanic fashions in the fibulae, are characteristic of the cosmopolitan outlook of the Cernjachov culture in a region without defined topographic confines.

<i>Limes Moesiae</i>

The Moesian Limes or Limes Moesiae is the modern term given to a collection of Roman fortifications between the Black Sea shore and Pannonia, present-day Hungary, consisting primarily of forts along the Danube to protect the Roman provinces of Upper and Lower Moesia south of the river.

Acidava

Acidava (Acidaua) was a Dacian and later Roman fortress on the Olt river near the lower Danube. The settlements remains are located in today's Enoşeşti, Olt County, Oltenia, Romania.

Amutria

Amutria was a Dacian town close to the Danube and included in the Roman road network, after the conquest of Dacia.

Capidava

Capidava was an important Geto-Dacian center on the right bank of the Danube. After the Roman conquest, it became a civil and military center, as part of the province of Moesia Inferior, modern Dobruja.

Micia

Micia was a large Roman fort for auxiliary troops and an important part of the western Dacian limes. The archaeological site is located in the municipality of Vețel (Witzel), Hunedoara County in Transylvania, Romania. This Roman garrison monitored and secured the road and the river route to Partiscum, today Szeged, Hungary. In addition, there was a strategically important river port. In the civil settlement, there were large baths and a small amphitheater. The large number of ancient inscriptions are significant.

Castra of Bulci

The castra of Bulci was a fort in the Roman province of Dacia located on the western side of defensive line of forts, limes Daciae. Its ruins are located in Bulci.

Castra of Bucium

The castra of Bucium was a fort in the Roman province of Dacia in the 2nd and 3rd centuries AD. Its ruins are located in Bucium.

Castra of Cincșor

The castra of Cincșor was a fort in the Roman province of Dacia in the 2nd and 3rd centuries AD.

This section of the timeline of Romanian history concerns events from Late Neolithic till Late Antiquity, which took place in or are directly related with the territory of modern Romania.

References

  1. "Results of the 2016 local elections". Central Electoral Bureau. Retrieved 6 April 2020.
  2. "Populaţia stabilă pe judeţe, municipii, oraşe şi localităti componenete la RPL_2011" (in Romanian). National Institute of Statistics. Retrieved 4 February 2014.
  3. "National Archaeological Record (RAN)" . Retrieved 10 October 2012.
  4. Sucidava photos Archived 2008-10-26 at the Wayback Machine
  5. Archaeological research about Romans in Romania during the 3rd and 4th centuries AD (in Romanian)
  6. Castrul roman de la Pietroasa de Jos (in Romanian)
  7. Alexandru Madgearu Istoria Militara a Daciei Post Romane 275-376 page 126
  8. Campbell, Joseph. The Masks of God: Creative Mythology. 1968.