Pinner

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Pinner
Pinner - High Street - geograph.org.uk - 81890.jpg
High Street
Greater London UK location map 2.svg
Red pog.svg
Pinner
Location within Greater London
Population31,130  2011 Census [1]
OS grid reference TQ115895
  Charing Cross 12.2 miles (19.6 km)  SE
London borough
Ceremonial county Greater London
Region
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town PINNER
Postcode district HA5
Dialling code 020
Police Metropolitan
Fire London
Ambulance London
UK Parliament
London Assembly
List of places
UK
England
London
51°35′36″N0°23′22″W / 51.5932°N 0.3894°W / 51.5932; -0.3894 Coordinates: 51°35′36″N0°23′22″W / 51.5932°N 0.3894°W / 51.5932; -0.3894

Pinner is a London suburb in the London borough of Harrow, Greater London, England, 12 miles (19 km) northwest of Charing Cross, close to the border with Hillingdon, in the historic county of Middlesex. The population was 31,130 in 2011. [2]

Contents

Originally a mediaeval hamlet, the St John Baptist church is 14th century and other parts of the historic village include Tudor buildings. The newer High Street is mainly 18th-century buildings, while Bridge Street has a more urban character and many chain stores.

History

Street sign Pinnersign.jpg
Street sign

Pinner was originally a hamlet, first recorded in 1231 as Pinnora, [3] :11 although the already archaic -ora (meaning 'hill') suggests its origins lie no later than circa 900. [3] :1 The name Pinn is shared with the River Pinn, which runs through the middle of Pinner. Another suggestion of the name is that it means 'hill-slope shaped like a pin'. [4]

The oldest part of the town lies around the fourteenth-century parish church of St. John the Baptist, at the junction of the present day Grange Gardens, The High Street and Church Lane. The church was originally a chapel of ease to St Mary's Church in Harrow, and was first mentioned in 1234. It was rebuilt in the early fourteenth-century, and rededicated in 1321. The parish became independent of St Mary's in 1766, when the first perpetual curate was appointed; not until the Wilberforce Act of 1868 did it appoint its first vicar, one William Hind. [3] :34 The earliest surviving private dwelling, East End Farm Cottage, dates from the late fifteenth century. [3] :18

The village expanded rapidly between 1923 and 1939 when a series of garden estates, including the architecturally significant Pinnerwood estate conservation area – encouraged by the Metropolitan Railway – grew around its historic core. [3] :176–184 It was largely from this time onwards that the area (including Hatch End, which forms the northeastern part of Pinner) assumed much of its present-day suburban character. The area is now continuous with neighbouring suburban districts including Rayners Lane and Eastcote.

Pinner contains a large number of homes built in the 1930s Art Deco style, the most grand of which is the Grade II listed Elm Park Court at the junction of West End Lane and Elm Park Road. [3] :25 Pinner is also the site of one of the UK's oldest chartered fairs, held annually since 1336. [5]

Pinner is within the bounds of the historic county of Middlesex; it was located at the western end of the hundred of Gore, before it was in the Hendon Rural District.[ citation needed ]

Parish church

Pinner's St John the Baptist parish church was consecrated in 1321, but built on the site of an earlier Christian place of worship. The west tower and south porch date from the 15th century. [6]

Governance

Harrow Council has been governed by the Conservative Party since 2022. Pinner has two wards, Pinner and Pinner South, each represented by three councillors. Pinner is in the Brent and Harrow constituency for the London Assembly which has been represented since 2008 by Navin Shah (Labour). Since the 2010 general election, Pinner has been part of the Ruislip, Northwood and Pinner parliamentary constituency, currently served by David Simmonds. [7]

Geography

Farmland near Pinner Farmland near Pinner - geograph.org.uk - 5967392.jpg
Farmland near Pinner

Pinner includes Pinner Village at its centre, along with the localities of Pinner Green and Pinnerwood Park Conservation Area [8] to the north. To the north east is the larger area of Hatch End, served by Hatch End railway station (originally opened as Pinner).

The River Pinn flows through Pinner, flowing in a diagonal direction. Large parks and open spaces are Pinner Memorial Park, Pinner Village Gardens, Pinner Wood (woodlands) and Pinner Park (farmland).

Much of Pinner has an elevation of about 148 feet (45 m) to 200 feet (60 m). Nower Hill rises to a peak of about 260 feet (80 m) above sea level while Pinner Park peaks at 203 feet (62 m). The semi-rural Pinnerwood area is steep, and rises to a peak of over 390 feet (120 m) around Pinner Hill Golf Course.

Demography

The lake at Pinner Memorial Park Pinner Memorial Park - The Pond - geograph.org.uk - 81897.jpg
The lake at Pinner Memorial Park

Pinner is both a religiously and culturally mixed area, with the ethnic minority population having grown significantly since the 1970s. [9] Pinner ward nonetheless had the highest concentration of people describing themselves as white in the London Borough of Harrow, at 72 per cent of the population in 2011. In 2013 the Pinner South ward had the next highest proportion of white people in the borough at 69.4 per cent. [10] Various churches, a synagogue and others serve the religious needs of the community.

Pinner also has the lowest crime rate in the whole of London, with several independent schools and single-sex schools with a prestigious reputation, making it a popular area for affluent families. [11] In the 2014/15 period, the Pinner South ward had a crime rate of 24.5, which was the lowest out of all 628 wards of Greater London. [12] The ward also has (data from 2009 to 2013) the second highest female life expectancy in the capital: 91.7 years, only bettered by Holland ward in Kensington and Chelsea. [12]

Fairs and Fetes

Crowds at Pinner Fair, 1988 Pinner Fair (geograph 3406556).jpg
Crowds at Pinner Fair, 1988

Pinner holds a number of Fairs and Fetes that are renowned in North West London for bringing its diverse and cosmopolitan community together.

Sport and leisure

Pinner has a rugby union team, Pinner and Grammarians RFC, a member club of the Rugby Football Union. It is the most junior team to have supplied a President to the RFU. [22] Pinner also has a cricket team, Pinner Cricket Club, [23] and a youth football club, Pinner United FC. [24] The area also has a golf course, Pinner Golf course. [25]

In addition to numerous restaurants and a number of public houses, Pinner has an amateur theatre group, Pinner Players, who have been performing in the area since 1936 and currently stage productions at Pinner Village Hall [26] off Chapel Lane. [27]

The Heath Robinson Museum in Pinner Memorial Park was opened in 2016 and is dedicated to the work of the cartoonist William Heath Robinson.

Literature

Edward Lear makes reference to Pinner [28] in More Nonsense Pictures, Rhymes, Botany, etc:

There was an old person of Pinner,
As thin as a lath, if not thinner;
They dressed him in white,
And roll'd him up tight,
That elastic old person of Pinner.

H. G. Wells mentions Pinner in The War of the Worlds :

He learned they were the wife and the younger sister of a surgeon living at Stanmore, who had come in the small hours from a dangerous case at Pinner, and heard at some railway station on his way of the Martian advance.

Broadcast media

Notable people

Sir Elton John was born and grew up in Pinner Elton John on stage, 2008.jpg
Sir Elton John was born and grew up in Pinner

Transport

George V Avenue dual carriageway, which cuts through Pinner Park George V Avenue.jpg
George V Avenue dual carriageway, which cuts through Pinner Park

Rail

Pinner Underground station was opened in 1885 and is on the Metropolitan line in London fare zone 5. In normal off-peak conditions the train takes approximately half an hour to Baker Street Underground station and approximately three-quarters of an hour to Aldgate Underground station.

Hatch End railway station was opened in 1842 and is on the London Overground Watford DC line in London fare zone 6. In normal off-peak conditions it roughly takes three-quarters of an hour to Euston railway station.

Buses

RouteStartEndOperator
183 Pinner, Bridge Street Golders Green Bus Station London Sovereign
H11 Harrow Bus StationNorthwood, Mount Vernon Hospital,London Sovereign
H12 South Harrow Bus Station Stanmore StationLondon Sovereign
H13 Ruislip Lido Northwood Hills, St Vincent's Park Metroline
398 [60] Ruislip Station Greenford, Hemery Road London United Busways

Public Transport in Pinner is governed by Transport for London.

Heritage

Harrow Heritage Plaques

The brown plaques are awarded by the Harrow Heritage Trust, [61] who secure the protection, preservation, restoration and improvement of the character and amenities of the London Borough of Harrow.

English Heritage Plaques

London's blue plaques scheme, run by English Heritage, [63] celebrates the links between notable figures of the past and the buildings in which they lived and worked.

Architecture

The architecture in Pinner has evolved greatly over the centuries. The majority of the architecture is conserved by private residents or by Harrow council's Conservation Team. [66]

Norman, Gothic and Tudor architecture (1066–1603)

High Street Looking west south-west down the High Street - geograph.org.uk - 5074179.jpg
High Street

Georgian architecture (1714–1811)

Estate agent at the corner of High Street Gibbs Gillespie - geograph.org.uk - 6462642.jpg
Estate agent at the corner of High Street
Pinner Police Station, Waxwell Lane Pinner Police Station - geograph.org.uk - 1489751.jpg
Pinner Police Station, Waxwell Lane

Victorian architecture (1837–1901)

Tooke's Folly at Pinner Hill Farm, c. 1862 Tooke's Folly, Pinner Hill Farm - geograph.org.uk - 6414673.jpg
Tooke's Folly at Pinner Hill Farm, c. 1862

Metro-land architecture (1903–1939)

Art Deco architecture (1919–1939)

Modern architecture (1945–1980)

Postmodern architecture (1980–present)

See also

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