Poddębice

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Poddębice
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Poddębice Palace
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Poddębice
Coordinates: 51°54′N18°58′E / 51.900°N 18.967°E / 51.900; 18.967 Coordinates: 51°54′N18°58′E / 51.900°N 18.967°E / 51.900; 18.967
CountryFlag of Poland.svg  Poland
Voivodeship Łódź
County Poddębice County
Gmina Gmina Poddębice
Government
  MayorPiotr Sęczkowski
Area
  Total5.89 km2 (2.27 sq mi)
Population
 (31 December 2020)
  Total7,245 Decrease2.svg [1]
Time zone UTC+1 (CET)
  Summer (DST) UTC+2 (CEST)
Postal code
99-200
Car plates EPD
Website http://www.poddebice.pl

Poddębice [pɔdːɛmˈbʲit͡sɛ] is a town in central Poland, in Łódź Voivodeship, about 40 km northwest of Łódź. It is the capital of Poddębice County. Population is 7,245 (2020). [1]

Contents

History

Jewish Population

At the beginning of World War II, the Jewish population of Poddębice numbered around 1,400. During the German occupation, they were confined to a ghetto and subject to forced labor. In 1942, five were hung publicly and in April, 1,800 Jews, including several hundred forcibly resettled from Łęczyca, were confined in a church for ten days without any essentials, including food until a bribe was paid. Ten died there. After a few days, the sick and the elderly were then murdered nearby. After ten days, some skilled workers were sent to the Łódź Ghetto. All the remainder were sent to the Chełmno extermination camp where they were immediately gassed. Few of Poddębice's Jews survived the war. The German administrator of Poddębice (probably Franz Heinrich Bock) kept a secret diary published after the war. His diary was critical of the anti-Jewish policies. He had tried to help the Jewish population when he could. He was removed from his post during the war. [2]

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References

  1. 1 2 "Local Data Bank". Statistics Poland. Retrieved 6 November 2021. Data for territorial unit 1011034.
  2. Megargee, Geoffrey (2012). Encyclopedia of Camps and Ghettos. Bloomington, Indiana: University of Indiana Press. p. Volume II, 94–95. ISBN   978-0-253-35599-7.