Pohorje

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Pohorje
Bachergebirge
Mariborsko pohorje panorama.jpg
Pohorje near Maribor
Highest point
Peak Black Peak (Črni vrh)
Elevation 1,543 m (5,062 ft)
Coordinates 46°30′13″N15°27′11″E / 46.50361°N 15.45306°E / 46.50361; 15.45306
Geography
Pohorje.png
Location of Pohorje
CountrySlovenia
Range coordinates 46°32′N15°28′E / 46.533°N 15.467°E / 46.533; 15.467 Coordinates: 46°32′N15°28′E / 46.533°N 15.467°E / 46.533; 15.467
Parent range Southern Limestone Alps

Pohorje (pronounced  [ˈpóːxɔɾjɛ] ), also known as the Pohorje Massif [1] [2] or the Pohorje Mountains (German : Bachergebirge, Bacherngebirge or often simply Bachern), is a mostly wooded, medium-high mountain range south of the Drava River in northeastern Slovenia. According to the traditional AVE classification it belongs to the Southern Limestone Alps. Geologically, it forms part of the Central Alps and features silicate metamorphic and igneous rock. Pohorje is sparsely populated with dispersed villages. There are also some ski resorts.

Contents

Geography

Pohorje is an Alpine mountain ridge with domed summits south of the Drava. It roughly lies in the triangle formed by the towns of Maribor (to the east), Dravograd (to the west) and Slovenske Konjice (to the south). To the northwest, it is bounded by the Mislinja River, to the south by the Vitanje Lowlands (Vitanjsko podolje), to the east it descends to the Drava Plain (Dravsko polje) and to the southeast it descends to the Pohorje Foothills (Podpohorske gorice). It measures about 50 km (31 mi) from east to west and 30 km (19 mi) from north to south and covers an area of ca. 840 km2 (320 sq mi). Its highest elevations are Black Peak (Slovene : Črni Vrh, German : Schwarzkogel) 1,543 m (5,062 ft), the only slightly lower Big Kopa Peak (Velika Kopa), and Lake Peak (Jezerski vrh), which rises to 1,537 m (5,043 ft). Forests cover over 70% of its surface. [3]

Geology

Cizlakite sample Cizlakit.jpg
Cizlakite sample

Pohorje is a young mountain massif and is the southeasternmost part of the Central Alps. [4] It is the only mountain chain in Slovenia made of silicate rock. Its peripheral parts consist of Paleozoic metamorphic rock, and its central parts of igneous rock, particularly granodiorite (known also as the Pohorje tonalite) and dacite. [5]

Near the village of Cezlak lies probably the only known deposit of cizlakite (quartz monzogabbro; a green plutonic rock). The southern parts of Pohorje are known for white marble, which was quarried in Roman times. [5]

Pohorje ski resorts

The following ski resorts stand at Pohorje:

Radio towers

Near hilltops within the mountain range are located a TV and radio transmitter Pohorje and a military air-traffic control radar station RP-2.

Related Research Articles

Maribor Place in Styria, Slovenia

Maribor is the second-largest city in Slovenia and the largest city of the traditional region of Lower Styria. It is also the seat of the City Municipality of Maribor, the seat of the Drava statistical region and the Eastern Slovenia region. Maribor is also the economic, administrative, educational, and cultural centre of eastern Slovenia.

Geography of Slovenia

Slovenia is situated at the crossroads of central and southeast Europe, touching the Alps and bordering the Adriatic Sea. The Alps—including the Julian Alps, the Kamnik-Savinja Alps and the Karawank chain, as well as the Pohorje massif—dominate northern Slovenia along its long border to Austria. Slovenia's Adriatic coastline stretches approximately 47 km (29 mi) from Italy to Croatia. Its part south of Sava river belongs to Balkan peninsula – Balkans.

Carinthia (Slovenia) Traditional region in Slovenia

Carinthia, also Slovene Carinthia or Slovenian Carinthia, is a traditional region in northern Slovenia. The term refers to the small southeasternmost area of the former Duchy of Carinthia, which after World War I was allocated to the State of Slovenes, Croats and Serbs according to the 1919 Treaty of Saint-Germain. It has no distinct centre, but a local centre in each of the three central river valleys among the heavily forested mountains.

Tourism in Slovenia

Slovenia offers tourists a wide variety of landscapes: Alpine in the northwest, Mediterranean in the southwest, Pannonian in the northeast, and Dinaric in the southeast. They roughly correspond to the traditional regions of Slovenia, based on the former four Habsburg crown lands. Each offers its own natural, geographic, architectural, and cultural features. Slovenia has mountains, meadows, lakes, caves, and the sea, making it an attractive destination in Europe.

Meža

The Meža (Slovene) or Mieß (German) is a river in the Austrian state of Carinthia and in Slovenia, a right tributary of the Drava. It is 43 kilometers (27 mi) long, of which 42 kilometers (26 mi) are in Slovenia. Its catchment area is 551.7 square kilometers (213.0 sq mi), of which 543 square kilometers (210 sq mi) in Slovenia.

Karawanks

The Karawanks or Karavankas or Karavanks are a mountain range of the Southern Limestone Alps on the border between Slovenia to the south and Austria to the north. With a total length of 120 kilometres (75 mi) in an east-west direction, the Karawanks chain is one of the longest ranges in Europe. It is traversed by important trade routes and has a great tourist significance. Geographically and geologically, it is divided into the higher Western Karawanks and the lower-lying Eastern Karawanks. It is traversed by the Periadriatic Seam, separating the Apulian tectonic plate from the Eurasian Plate.

Styria (Slovenia) Traditional region in Slovenia

Styria, also Slovenian Styria or Lower Styria, is a traditional region in northeastern Slovenia, comprising the southern third of the former Duchy of Styria. The population of Styria in its historical boundaries amounts to around 705,000 inhabitants, or 34.5% of the population of Slovenia. The largest city is Maribor.

Noric Alps

The Noric Alps is a collective term denoting various mountain ranges of the Eastern Alps. The name derives from the ancient Noricum province of the Roman Empire on the territory of present-day Austria and the adjacent Bavarian and Slovenian area.

Municipality of Rače-Fram Municipality of Slovenia

The Municipality of Rače–Fram is a municipality south of Maribor in northeastern Slovenia. Its administrative seat is the settlement of Rače. The area was traditionally was part of the Styria region. It is now included in the Drava Statistical Region. The municipality covers an area of 52 square kilometres (20 sq mi) and extends from the plain on the right bank of the Drava River into the Pohorje Hills. The Ljubljana–Maribor motorway and railway line run through the municipality.

Municipality of Hoče-Slivnica Municipality of Slovenia

The Municipality of Hoče–Slivnica is a municipality south of Maribor in northeastern Slovenia. Its administrative seat is Spodnje Hoče.

Zreče Place in Styria, Slovenia

Zreče is a town in northeast Slovenia and is the seat of the Municipality of Zreče. It lies on the slopes of Pohorje in the upper valley of the Dravinja River. The area is part of the traditional region of Styria. It is now included in the Savinja Statistical Region. The economy is centred on tourism, especially in the winter months with the ski resort at Rogla. A proportion of the population is also employed in agriculture. Its main industry is the tool manufacturer Kovaska Industrija.

Rogla

Rogla is a peak on Zreče Pohorje in the Municipality of Zreče in northeastern Slovenia. The area is part of the traditional region of Styria. It is now included in the Savinja Statistical Region.

The Polskava is a river in Styria, Slovenia. The river is 40 kilometres (25 mi) in length. Its source is on the Pohorje Massif, near Saint Henry's Church at the Maribor Pohorje Ski Resort. It passes Šmartno na Pohorju, Zgornja Polskava, Spodnja Polskava, Pragersko, and Lovrenc na Dravskem Polju, and merges with the Dravinja River near Videm pri Ptuju.

Fram Creek is a stream in Styria, Slovenia. It is 26 kilometres (16 mi) in length. Its source is on the Pohorje Massif, near Sveti Areh in the Maribor Pohorje Ski Resort. It passes Fram and Rače and merges with other streams of the Drava Plain and joins the Polskava River near Župečja Vas.

Dolgi Vrh Place in Styria, Slovenia

Dolgi Vrh is a settlement in the Pohorje Hills in the Municipality of Slovenska Bistrica in northeastern Slovenia. It lies south of Slovenska Bistrica itself. The railway line from Ljubljana to Maribor runs along the eastern edge of the settlement. The area is part of the traditional region of Styria. It is now included with the rest of the municipality in the Drava Statistical Region.

Lukanja Village in Styria, Slovenia

Lukanja is a dispersed settlement in the Pohorje Hills in the Municipality of Slovenska Bistrica in northeastern Slovenia. Some of the Rogla ski resort facilities extend into the territory of Lukanja. The area is part of the traditional region of Styria. It is now included with the rest of the municipality in the Drava Statistical Region.

Krvavec Ski Resort

The Krvavec Ski Resort is the second-largest Slovenian ski resort, located in the Municipality of Cerklje na Gorenjskem in the Kamnik–Savinja Alps. The nearest city is Kranj and it is 25 km from Ljubljana. The resort is located 10 km from Ljubljana Jože Pučnik Airport and it is the nearest ski resort to an international airport in Europe. It has a total 30 km of ski slopes.

Maribor Pohorje Ski Resort

Maribor Pohorje Ski Resort is the largest ski resort in Slovenia, located just south of Maribor, at the mountain range of Pohorje in Lower Styria.

Hočko Pohorje Place in Styria, Slovenia

Hočko Pohorje is a settlement in the Municipality of Hoče-Slivnica in northeastern Slovenia. It lies in the eastern Pohorje Hills south of Maribor. The area is part of the traditional region of Styria. The municipality is now included in the Drava Statistical Region.

The Slovenian Mountain Hiking Trail, sometimes also called Transverzala, is a route from Maribor to Ankaran. It covers most of the Slovenian mountain areas including Pohorje, the Julian Alps, the Kamnik-Savinja Alps, the Karawanks, and the southwestern part of Slovenia. It is the oldest hiking track in Europe.

References

  1. Bogataj, Janez. 1999. Handicrafts of Slovenia: Encounters with Contemporary Slovene Craftsmen. Ljubljana: Rokus, p. 28.
  2. Watkins, Clem S. 2003. The Balkans. Hauppauge, NY: Nova Science Publishers, p. 125.
  3. Uratarič, Nina, ed. (June 2011). NATREG: Final Publication. REC Ljubljana. pp. 36–40. Retrieved 28 March 2015.
  4. Gams, Ivan (2008). "Geomorphology of the Pohorje Mountains". Acta geographica Slovenica. Scientific Research Centre of the Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts. 48 (2): 185–254. doi: 10.3986/AGS48201 .
  5. 1 2 "Rocks of Pohorje". Tourist Information Centre Pohorje. Retrieved 28 March 2015.