Point Reyes Station, California

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Point Reyes Station
Point Reyes Station (6474).JPG
State Route 1 runs through Point Reyes Station
Marin County California Incorporated and Unincorporated areas Point Reyes Station Highlighted.svg
Location in Marin County and the state of California
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Point Reyes Station
Location in the United States
Coordinates: 38°04′09″N122°48′25″W / 38.06917°N 122.80694°W / 38.06917; -122.80694 Coordinates: 38°04′09″N122°48′25″W / 38.06917°N 122.80694°W / 38.06917; -122.80694
Country Flag of the United States.svg  United States
State Flag of California.svg  California
County Marin
Government
   County Board District 4
Dennis Rodoni [1]
   State Senator Mike McGuire (D) [2]
   Assemblymember Marc Levine (D) [2]
   U. S. Rep. Jared Huffman (D) [3]
Area
[4]
  Total3.616 sq mi (9.364 km2)
  Land3.616 sq mi (9.364 km2)
  Water0 sq mi (0 km2)  0%
Elevation
[5]
39 ft (12 m)
Population
 (2010)
  Total848
  Density230/sq mi (91/km2)
Time zone UTC-8 (PST)
  Summer (DST) UTC-7 (PDT)
ZIP code
94956
Area codes 415/628
FIPS code 06-57960
GNIS feature ID 1659413

Point Reyes Station (formerly, Marin and Olema Station) [6] is a small unincorporated town located in western Marin County, California. Point Reyes Station is located 13 miles (21 km) south-southeast of Tomales, [6] at an elevation of 39 feet (12 m). [5] Point Reyes Station is located along State Route 1 and is a gateway to the Point Reyes National Seashore, an extremely popular national preserve. About 350 people live in the town. It is also the name of a census-designated place (CDP) in northern California covering the unincorporated town and surrounding countryside, with a total CDP population of 848.

Contents

Geography

Towns of rural West Marin in Marin County. Point Reyes Station is in blue. WestMarinTowns.png
Towns of rural West Marin in Marin County. Point Reyes Station is in blue.

Point Reyes Station is located at 38°04′09″N122°48′25″W / 38.06917°N 122.80694°W / 38.06917; -122.80694 , [5] just south and east of the southern end of Tomales Bay, and slightly east of the San Andreas Fault just before the fault submerges down the center of Tomales Bay.

Formerly an actual port and railway terminus, Point Reyes Station, CA nominally borders Tomales Bay; the introduction of European cattle and planting of European grass seed on the natural hills caused destructive erosion and a combination of small dirt dams, silting, and intentional landfill for farming raised the level of former salt marshes and has left Point Reyes Station approximately 0.8-mile (1.3 km) from the nearest tidal flats, and that after expenditure of millions of dollars and recent efforts for reclamation of the natural environment.

The CDP has a total area of 3.62 sq mi (9.4 km2), all land.

History

Once land of the Coast Miwok Indians, Point Reyes Station gets its name from the nearby Point Reyes Peninsula (a major peninsula sticking out into the Pacific Ocean) and its status as a terminus stop on the North Pacific Coast Railroad connecting Cazadero to the Sausalito ferry.

Point Reyes Station is very close to the San Andreas Fault, which was responsible for the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. At one time, the epicenter of the quake was thought to be near Olema. A walking tour of the fault can be taken from the Point Reyes National Seashore's Visitor Center.

The place was called Olema Station when the railroad arrived in 1875. [6] The Point Reyes post office opened in 1882, changed its name to Marin in 1891, changed it back to Point Reyes later in 1891, and changed it to Point Reyes Station later in 1891.

Demographics

The 2010 United States Census [7] reported that Point Reyes Station had a population of 848. The population density was 234.5 people per square mile (90.6/km2). The racial makeup of Point Reyes Station was 725 (85.5%) White, 7 (0.8%) African American, 3 (0.4%) Native American, 10 (1.2%) Asian, 73 (8.6%) from other races, and 30 (3.5%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 155 persons (18.3%).

The Census reported that 100% of the population lived in households.

There were 412 households, out of which 87 (21.1%) had children under the age of 18 living in them, 168 (40.8%) were opposite-sex married couples living together, 19 (4.6%) had a female householder with no husband present, 21 (5.1%) had a male householder with no wife present. There were 19 (4.6%) unmarried opposite-sex partnerships, and 4 (1.0%) same-sex married couples or partnerships. 172 households (41.7%) were made up of individuals, and 90 (21.8%) had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.06. There were 208 families (50.5% of all households); the average family size was 2.84.

The population was spread out, with 155 people (18.3%) under the age of 18, 48 people (5.7%) aged 18 to 24, 152 people (17.9%) aged 25 to 44, 299 people (35.3%) aged 45 to 64, and 194 people (22.9%) who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 51.1 years. For every 100 females, there were 81.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 81.4 males.

There were 490 housing units at an average density of 135.5 per square mile (52.3/km2), of which 50.2% were owner-occupied and 49.8% were occupied by renters. The homeowner vacancy rate was 0%; the rental vacancy rate was 6.8%. 50.6% of the population lived in owner-occupied housing units and 49.4% lived in rental housing units.

View of Point Reyes to Petaluma Road Point Reyes-Petaluma Road View.jpg
View of Point Reyes to Petaluma Road

Economy

A number of agricultural companies, many using organic and sustainable practices, are located there, including Cowgirl Creamery and Point Reyes Farmstead Cheese Company. Marin Organic operates out of the city.

See also

Related Research Articles

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Inverness, California census-designated place in California, United States

Inverness is an unincorporated community and census-designated place (CDP) located in western Marin County, California. Inverness is located on the southwest shore of Tomales Bay 3.5 miles (5.6 km) northwest of Point Reyes Station, at an elevation of 43 feet. In the 2010 census, the population was 1,304. The community is named after Inverness, Scotland and was named by a Scottish landowner.

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Stinson Beach, California census-designated place in California, United States

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Point Reyes National Seashore Park preserve in California, USA

Point Reyes National Seashore is a 71,028-acre (287.44 km2) park preserve located on the Point Reyes Peninsula in Marin County, California. As a national seashore, it is maintained by the US National Park Service as an important nature preserve. Some existing agricultural uses are allowed to continue within the park. Clem Miller, a US Congressman from Marin County wrote and introduced the bill for the establishment of Point Reyes National Seashore in 1962 to protect the peninsula from development which was proposed at the time for the slopes above Drake's Bay. All of the park's beaches were listed as the cleanest in the state in 2010.

Point Reyes

Point Reyes (re-ʝes) is a prominent cape and popular Northern California tourist destination on the Pacific coast. It is located in Marin County, and approximately 30 miles (50 km) west-northwest of San Francisco. The term is often applied to the Point Reyes Peninsula, the region bounded by Tomales Bay on the northeast and Bolinas Lagoon on the southeast. The headland is protected as part of Point Reyes National Seashore.

Tomales Bay

Tomales Bay is a long, narrow inlet of the Pacific Ocean in Marin County in northern California in the United States. It is approximately 15 mi (24 km) long and averages nearly 1.0 mi (1.6 km) wide, effectively separating the Point Reyes Peninsula from the mainland of Marin County. It is located approximately 30 mi (48 km) northwest of San Francisco. The bay forms the eastern boundary of Point Reyes National Seashore. Tomales Bay is recognized for protection by the California Bays and Estuaries Policy. On its northern end, it opens out onto Bodega Bay, which shelters it from the direct current of the Pacific. The bay is formed along a submerged portion of the San Andreas Fault.

Olema, California Unincorporated community in California, United States

Olema is an unincorporated community in Marin County, California. It is located on Olema Creek 2.25 miles (3.6 km) south-southeast of Point Reyes Station, at an elevation of 69 feet.

Lagunitas Creek Stream in California, United States

Lagunitas Creek is a 24 miles (39 km)-long northward-flowing stream in Marin County, California. It is critically important to the largest spawning runs of endangered coho salmon in the Central California Coast Coho salmon Evolutionary Significant Unit. The stream's headwaters begin on the northern slopes of Mt. Tamalpais in the Coast Range and terminate in southeast Tomales Bay, 1.5 miles (2.4 km) northwest of Point Reyes Station, California. Lagunitas Creek feeds several reservoirs on Mt. Tamalpais that supply a major portion of the county's drinking water.

Tomales Bay State Park

Tomales Bay State Park is a California state park in Marin County, California. It consists of approximately 2,000 acres (8 km²) divided between two areas, one on the west side of Tomales Bay and the other on the east side. The main area, on the west, is part of the Point Reyes peninsula, and adjacent to Point Reyes National Seashore, which is operated by the U.S. National Park Service. The park is approximately 40 miles (64 km) north of San Francisco.

Inverness Park, California Unincorporated community in California, United States

Inverness Park is a small unincorporated community in Marin County, California. It is located 1 mile (1.6 km) west-southwest of Point Reyes Station, at an elevation of 148 feet.

Tomales High School is located in the town of Tomales, California, United States. It is the comprehensive high school of the Shoreline Unified School District. It serves the western Marin and Sonoma County communities, stretching from the towns of Point Reyes Station and Inverness along Tomales Bay, running north past the fishing port of Bodega Bay to the mouth of the Russian River, a distance of nearly 50 miles (80 km), and widening 13 miles (21 km) east from the west coast. Tomales High School draws its students from approximately 450 square miles (1,200 km2). Tomales High School was recognized as a California Distinguished School in 2011.

Olema Valley is a gorge formed by the San Andreas Fault in rural west Marin County, Northern California. The valley runs from the southern end of Tomales Bay through Point Reyes Station, the town of Olema, and Dogtown, to the Bolinas Lagoon, which lies between Bolinas and Stinson Beach. It is part of the Golden Gate National Recreation Area.

Rancho Punta de los Reyes was a 13,645-acre (55.22 km2) Mexican land grant in present day Marin County, California, given in 1836 by Governor Nicolás Gutiérrez to James Richard Berry. The grant was east of Rancho Las Baulines and south of Rancho Tomales y Baulines.

Rancho Punta de los Reyes was a 8,878-acre (35.93 km2) Mexican land grant in present-day western Marin County, California, given in 1836 by Governor Nicolás Gutiérrez to James Richard Berry and re-granted in 1838 by Governor Juan B. Alvarado to Joseph Snook. The grant extended along the west side of Tomales Bay and encompassed present day Inverness.

Rancho Tomales y Baulines was a 9,468-acre (38.32 km2) Mexican land grant in present day Marin County, California, given in 1836 by Governor Nicolás Gutiérrez to Rafael Garcia. The grant extended south from Point Reyes Station along the Olema Valley and encompassed present day Olema and Garcia.

Rancho Las Baulines was a 8,911-acre (36.06 km2) Mexican land grant in present-day Marin County, California, given in 1846 by Governor Pío Pico to Gregorio Briones. The grant extended around Bolinas Lagoon and encompassed present-day Stinson Beach and Bolinas.

References

  1. "County of Marin District 4 webpage". County of Marin . Retrieved February 7, 2020.
  2. 1 2 "Statewide Database". UC Regents. Archived from the original on February 1, 2015. Retrieved December 31, 2014.
  3. "California's 2nd Congressional District - Representatives & District Map". Civic Impulse, LLC. Retrieved March 8, 2013.
  4. "2010 Census U.S. Gazetteer Files – Places – California". United States Census Bureau.
  5. 1 2 3 U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Point Reyes Station, California
  6. 1 2 3 Durham, David L. (1998). California's Geographic Names: A Gazetteer of Historic and Modern Names of the State. Clovis, Calif.: Word Dancer Press. p. 683. ISBN   1-884995-14-4.
  7. "2010 Census Interactive Population Search: CA - Point Reyes Station CDP". U.S. Census Bureau. Archived from the original on July 15, 2014. Retrieved July 12, 2014.