Politika

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Политика
Politika
Serpol7nd.jpg
TypeDaily newspaper
Format Berliner
Owner(s) Politika AD (50%)
East Media Group (50%)
Founder(s) Vladislav F. Ribnikar
PublisherPolitika novine i magazini d.o.o.
EditorŽarko Rakić
Founded25 January [ O.S. 12 January] 1904
LanguageSerbian
HeadquartersPolitika Square 1, Belgrade, Serbia
Circulation ~45,000 copies sold (2016)
ISSN 0350-4395
OCLC number 231040838
Website www.politika.rs

Politika (Serbian Cyrillic : Политика; Politics) is a Serbian daily newspaper, published in Belgrade. Founded in 1904 [1] by Vladislav F. Ribnikar, it is the oldest daily newspaper still in circulation in the Balkans and is considered to be Serbia's newspaper of record. [2]

Contents

Publishing and ownership

Politika is published by Politika novine i magazini (PNM), a joint venture between Politika AD and East Media Group. [3] [4]

PNM also publishes:

Editorial history

History

Ever since its launch in January 1904, Politika was published daily, except for several periods:

The launch issue had only four pages and a circulation of 2,450 copies, and its record high circulation was the 25 December 1973 issue (634,000 copies).

Reporting during the Yugoslav wars

In the run-up to and during the breakup of Yugoslavia and the Yugoslav wars, Politika was under the control of Slobodan Milošević and the League of Communists of Serbia and was used for political purposes. It was used to publish controversial things such as the Vojko i Savle article, as well as an information guide to show what was allegedly happening to the Serbs in other republics, together with the Radio Television of Serbia. It blamed the local Kosovo Albanians for sodomizing Đorđe Martinović, and published fabricated reader letters claiming that the Albanians were "raping hundreds of Serbian women". Before and during the Croatian War of Independence, it published opinions on how "blood may shed again" in Croatia because of World War II, published claims on how the Vatican funded Croatia to break up Yugoslavia. At the end of the Battle of Vukovar, it ran the fabricated story of the Vukovar children massacre. [5] [6] [7] [8] The article was however retracted with a statement published the following day. [5] [ dead link ]

See also

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References

  1. Robert Thomas (January 1999). Serbia Under Milošević: Politics in the 1990s. C. Hurst & Co. Publishers. p. 15. ISBN   978-1-85065-367-7. Archived from the original on 24 March 2017. Retrieved 2 August 2015.
  2. "Grigorev Commentary in Politika: Serbs Vote is Pragmatic". The Bulletin Arcadia University. 1 February 2011. Archived from the original on 28 March 2012. Retrieved 9 March 2014. ... wrote a commentary in the Jan. 26 issue of Politika, the Serbian newspaper of record and the oldest daily in the Balkans.
  3. "Germany's WAZ in surprise sale of stake in Serbian daily". B92. 17 July 2012. Archived from the original on 19 July 2012. Retrieved 30 July 2012.
  4. "Daily Politika has new owner". Tanjug . 18 July 2012. Retrieved 30 July 2012.[ permanent dead link ]
  5. 1 2 Renaud de la Brosse (4 February 2003). "Political Propaganda and the Plan to Create a 'State for all Serbs' – Consequences of Using the Media for Ultra-Nationalist Ends – Part 1" (PDF). Office of the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia. Archived from the original (PDF) on 12 December 2005. Retrieved 16 April 2012.
  6. Renaud de la Brosse (4 February 2003). "Political Propaganda and the Plan to Create a 'State for all Serbs' – Consequences of Using the Media for Ultra-Nationalist Ends – Part 2" (PDF). Office of the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia. Archived from the original (PDF) on 12 December 2005. Retrieved 16 April 2012.
  7. Renaud de la Brosse (4 February 2003). "Political Propaganda and the Plan to Create a 'State for all Serbs' – Consequences of Using the Media for Ultra-Nationalist Ends – Part 3" (PDF). Office of the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia. Archived from the original (PDF) on 12 December 2005. Retrieved 16 April 2012.
  8. Renaud de la Brosse (4 February 2003). "Political Propaganda and the Plan to Create a 'State for all Serbs' – Consequences of Using the Media for Ultra-Nationalist Ends – Part 4" (PDF). Office of the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia. Archived from the original (PDF) on 12 December 2005. Retrieved 16 April 2012.