Pope Adeodatus I

Last updated
Pope Saint

Adeodatus I
Bishop of Rome
Pope Adeodatus I.jpg
Church Catholic Church
Diocese Rome
See Holy See
Papacy began19 October 615
Papacy ended8 November 618
Predecessor Boniface IV
Successor Boniface V
Orders
Created cardinal15 October 590
by Gregory I
Personal details
Born Rome, Byzantine Empire
Died(618-11-08)8 November 618
Rome, Byzantine Empire
Other popes named Adeodatus

Pope Adeodatus I (570 – 8 November 618), also called Deodatus I or Deusdedit, was the bishop of Rome from 19 October 615 to his death. He was the first priest to be elected pope since John II in 533. The first use of lead seals or bullae on papal documents is attributed to him. His feast day is 8 November.

Contents

Biography

Adeodatus was born in Rome, the son of a subdeacon named Stephen. He served as a priest for 40 years before his election and was the first priest to be elected pope since John II in 533. [1]

Pontificate

Almost nothing is known about Adeodatus I's pontificate. [1] It represents the second wave of opposition to Gregory the Great's papal reforms, the first being the pontificate of Sabinian. He reversed the practice of his predecessor, Boniface IV, of filling the papal administrative ranks with monks by recalling the clergy to such positions and by ordaining some 14 priests, the first ordinations in Rome since Gregory's pontificate. [2] [1] According to tradition, Adeodatus was the first pope to use lead seals (bullae) on papal documents, which in time came to be called "papal bulls". [3] One bulla dating from his reign is still preserved, the obverse of which represents the Good Shepherd in the midst of His sheep, with the letters Alpha and Omega underneath, while the reverse bears the inscription: Deusdedit Papæ. [4]

In August 618, an earthquake struck Rome, followed by an outbreak of scabies. Adeodatus died 8 November 618, and was eventually succeeded by Boniface V. [1] His feast day is 8 November. [4] He is also a saint in the Orthodox Church as one of the pre-Schism "Orthodox Popes of Rome". [5]

See also

Related Research Articles

Pope Agapetus I

Pope Agapetus I was the bishop of Rome from 13 May 535 to his death.

Pope Agatho served as the bishop of Rome from 27 June 678 until his death. He heard the appeal of Wilfrid of York, who had been displaced from his See by the division of the Archdiocese ordered by Theodore of Canterbury. During Agatho's tenure, the Sixth Ecumenical Council was convened which dealt with the monothelitism controversy. He is venerated as a saint by both the Catholic and Eastern Orthodox Churches.

Pope Boniface III 7th-century pope

Pope Boniface III was the bishop of Rome from 19 February 607 to his death. Despite his short pontificate he made a significant contribution to the Catholic Church.

Pope Boniface IV 7th-century pope

Pope Boniface IV was the bishop of Rome from 608 to his death. Boniface had served as a deacon under Pope Gregory I, and like his mentor, he ran the Lateran Palace as a monastery. As pope, he encouraged monasticism. With imperial permission, he converted the Pantheon into a church. In 610, he conferred with Bishop Mellitus of London regarding the needs of the English Church. He is venerated as a saint in the Catholic Church with a universal feast day on 8 May.

Pope Boniface V 7th-century pope

Pope Boniface V was the bishop of Rome from 23 December 619 to his death. He did much for the Christianisation of Anglo-Saxon England, and enacted the decree by which churches became places of sanctuary.

Pope Boniface VI was the bishop of Rome and ruler of the Papal States in April 896. He was a native of Rome. His election came about as a result of riots soon after the death of Pope Formosus. Prior to his reign, he had twice incurred a sentence of deprivation of orders as a subdeacon and as a priest. After a pontificate of fifteen days, he is said by some to have died of the gout, by others to have been forcibly ejected to make way for Stephen VI, the candidate of the Spoletan party.

Pope Gregory II was the bishop of Rome from 19 May 715 to his death. His defiance of Emperor Leo III the Isaurian as a result of the iconoclastic controversy in the Eastern Empire prepared the way for a long series of revolts, schisms and civil wars that eventually led to the establishment of the temporal power of the popes.

Pope Gregory III was the bishop of Rome from 11 February 731 to his death. His pontificate, like that of his predecessor, was disturbed by Byzantine iconoclasm and the advance of the Lombards, in which he invoked the intervention of Charles Martel, although ultimately in vain. He was the last pope to seek the consent of the Byzantine exarch of Ravenna for his election, and the last non-European Pope until Pope Francis was elected on March 13, 2013.

Pope Urban I 3rd century pope

Pope Urban I (175?-230) was the bishop of Rome from 222 to 23 May 230. He was born in Rome and succeeded Callixtus I, who had been martyred. It was previously believed for centuries that Urban I was also martyred. However, recent historical discoveries now lead scholars to believe that he died of natural causes.

Pope Sylvester I 33rd pope and saint (reigned 314–335)

Sylvester I was the bishop of Rome from 31 January 314 until his death. He filled the see of Rome at an important era in the history of the Western Church, yet very little is known of him. The accounts of his pontificate preserved in the seventh- or eighth-century Liber Pontificalis contain little more than a record of the gifts said to have been conferred on the church by Constantine I, although it does say that he was the son of a Roman named Rufinus. His feast is celebrated as Saint Sylvester's Day in Western Christianity on 31 December, while Eastern Christianity commemorates it on 2 January.

Pope Sergius I was the bishop of Rome from 15 December 687, to his death, and is revered as a saint by the Roman Catholic church. He was elected at a time when two rivals, Paschal and Theodore, were locked in dispute about which of them should become pope. His papacy was dominated by his response to the Quinisext Council, the canons of which he steadfastly refused to accept. Thereupon Emperor Justinian II ordered Sergius' arrest, but the Roman people and the Italian militia of the exarch of Ravenna refused to allow the exarch to bring Sergius to Constantinople.

Pope Pontian

Pope Pontian was the bishop of Rome from 21 July 230 to 28 September 235. In 235, during the persecution of Christians in the reign of the Emperor Maximinus Thrax, Pontian was arrested and sent to the island of Sardinia. He resigned to make the election of a new pope possible. When Pontian resigned on 28 September 235, he was the first pope to do so. It allowed an orderly transition in the Church of Rome and so ended a schism that had existed in the Church for eighteen years.

Pope Pius IX 255th Pope of the Catholic Church

Pius IX was head of the Catholic Church from 1846 to 1878, the longest papal reign. After starting as a liberal he reversed positions and strongly condemned liberalism. He was notable for convoking the Vatican Council in 1868 and for permanently losing papal control of the Papal States in 1870 to the Kingdom of Italy. He refused to leave Vatican City, declaring himself a "prisoner of the Vatican". His diplomacy mixes many failures with some successes such as Austria-Hungary, Portugal, Spain, Canada, Tuscany, Ecuador, Venezuela, Honduras, El Salvador, and Haiti.

Pope Felix IV Pope (526-530)

Pope Felix IV was the bishop of Rome from 12 July 526 to his death. He was the chosen candidate of Ostrogoth King Theodoric the Great, who had imprisoned Felix's predecessor, John I.

Pope Adeodatus II, sometimes called Deodatus, was the bishop of Rome from 672 to his death. He devoted much of his papacy to improving churches and fighting Monothelism.

Deusdedit or Deodatus is the name of several ecclesiastical figures of the Middle Ages:

Timeline of the Catholic Church

The history of the Catholic Church is integral to the history of Christianity as a whole. It is also, according to church historian, Mark A. Noll, the "world's oldest continuously functioning international institution." This article covers a period of just under two thousand years

Papal selection before 1059

There was no uniform procedure for papal selection before 1059. The bishops of Rome and supreme pontiffs (popes) of the Catholic Church were often appointed by their predecessors or by political rulers. While some kind of election often characterized the procedure, an election that included meaningful participation of the laity was rare, especially as the popes' claims to temporal power solidified into the Papal States. The practice of papal appointment during this period would later result in the jus exclusivae, i.e., a right to veto the selection that Catholic monarchs exercised into the twentieth century.

November 8 (Eastern Orthodox liturgics)

November 7 - Eastern Orthodox liturgical calendar - November 9

References

  1. 1 2 3 4 Attwater, Aubrey (1939). A Dictionary of Popes: From Peter to Pius XII. p. 66. ISBN   0199295816.
  2. Jeffrey Richards, The Popes and the Papacy in the Early Middle Ages (London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1979), p. 262
  3. “Pope Saint Adeodatus I”. New Catholic Dictionary. CatholicSaints.Info. 27 July 2012
  4. 1 2 Herbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "Pope St. Deusdedit"  . Catholic Encyclopedia . New York: Robert Appleton Company.
  5. Philips, Fr Andrew. "The Holy Orthodox Popes of Rome". orthodoxengland.org.uk. Retrieved 2018-03-17.
Catholic Church titles
Preceded by
Boniface IV
Pope
615–618
Succeeded by
Boniface V