Pope Adeodatus I

Last updated
Pope Saint

Adeodatus I
Adeodatus I (Deusdedit I).jpg
Papacy began19 October 615
Papacy ended8 November 618
Predecessor Boniface IV
Successor Boniface V
Orders
Created cardinal15 October 590
by St. Gregory I "The Great"
Personal details
Birth nameDeusdedit, son of Stephen
Born Rome, Byzantine Empire
Died(618-11-08)8 November 618
Rome, Byzantine Empire
Other popes named Adeodatus
Papal styles of
Pope Adeodatus I
Emblem of the Papacy SE.svg
Reference style His Holiness
Spoken styleYour Holiness
Religious styleHoly Father
Posthumous style Saint

Pope Adeodatus I (570 – 8 November 618), also called Deodatus I or Deusdedit, [1] was Pope from 19 October 615 to his death in 618. He was the first priest to be elected pope since John II in 533. The first use of lead seals or bullae on papal documents, (leading to the term "papal bull"), is attributed to him. His feast day is 8 November.

Pope leader of the Catholic Church

The pope, also known as the supreme pontiff, is the Bishop of Rome and ex officio leader of the worldwide Roman Catholic Church. Since 1929, the pope has also been head of state of Vatican City, a city-state enclaved within Rome, Italy. The current pope is Francis, who was elected on 13 March 2013, succeeding Benedict XVI.

Contents

Biography

He was born in Rome, the son of a subdeacon. He served as a priest for 40 years before his election and was the first priest to be elected pope since John II in 533. Adeodatus represents the second wave of anti-Gregorian challenge to the papacy, the first being that of Sabinian. He reversed the practice of his predecessor Boniface IV of filling the papal administrative ranks with monks by recalling the clergy to such positions and by ordaining some 14 priests, the first ordinations in Rome since Pope Gregory. [2]

Subdeacon is a title used in various branches of Christianity.

Pope Sabinian pope

Pope Sabinian was Pope from 13 September 604 to his death in 606, during the Byzantine domination of the Papacy; he was the fourth former apocrisiarius to Constantinople to be elected pope.

Pope Boniface IV pope

Pope Boniface IV was Pope from 25 September 608 to his death in 615. He is venerated as a saint in the Catholic Church with a universal feast falling annually on 8 May. Boniface had served as a deacon under Pope Gregory I, and like his mentor had made his house into a monastery. As Pope, he encouraged monks and monasticism. With permission of the Emperor, he converted the Pantheon into the Church of St. Mary and the Martyrs. In 610, he conferred with Mellitus, first bishop of London, regarding the needs of the English Church.

According to tradition, he was the first pope to use lead seals (bullae) on papal documents, which in time came to be called "papal bulls". [3] One bulla dating from his reign is still preserved, the obverse of which represents the Good Shepherd in the midst of His sheep, with the letters Alpha and Omega underneath, while the reverse bears the inscription: Deusdedit Papæ. [4]

Papal bull type of letters patent or charter issued by a Pope of the Catholic Church

A papal bull is a type of public decree, letters patent, or charter issued by a pope of the Roman Catholic Church. It is named after the leaden seal (bulla) that was traditionally appended to the end in order to authenticate it.

In August 618, an earthquake struck Rome, and later an outbreak of leprosy, during which Adeodatus led the effort to care for the poor and sick. [5] He died 8 November 618. There was a vacancy of one year, one month, and 16 days before his successor was consecrated. [6]

His feast occurs 8 November. [4] He is also a saint in the Orthodox Church as one of the pre-Schism "Orthodox Popes of Rome". [7]

See also

Related Research Articles

Pope John II 6th-century pope

Pope John II was Bishop of Rome from 2 January 533 to his death in 535.

Pope Agapetus I pope

Pope Agapetus I was Pope from 13 May 535 to his death in 536. He is not to be confused with another Saint Agapetus, an Early Christian martyr with the feast day of 6 August.

Pope Agatho pope

Pope Agatho served as the Pope from 27 June 678 until his death in 681. He heard the appeal of Wilfrid of York, who had been displaced from his See by the division of the Archdiocese ordered by Theodore of Canterbury. During Agatho's tenure, the Sixth Ecumenical Council was convened which dealt with the monothelitism controversy. He is venerated as a saint by both the Catholic and Eastern Orthodox Churches.

Pope Sixtus I pope

Pope Sixtus I, a Roman of Greek descent, was the Bishop of Rome from c. 115 to his death c. 124. He succeeded Pope Alexander I and was in turn succeeded by Pope Telesphorus. His feast is celebrated on 6 April.

Pope Sergius I pope

Pope Sergius I was Pope from December 15, 687, to his death in 701. He was elected at a time when two rivals, the Archdeacon Paschal and the Archpriest Theodore, were locked in dispute about which of them should become pope.

Pope Sergius IV Pope from 1009 to 1012

Pope Sergius IV was Pope and the ruler of the Papal States from 31 July 1009 to his death in 1012. He was born in Rome as Pietro Martino Buccaporci, which translates as "Peter Martin Pig Snout". The date of his birth is unknown.

Pope Pontian pope

Pope Pontian was Pope from 21 July 230 to 28 September 235. In 235, during the persecution of Christians in the reign of the Emperor Maximinus Thrax, Pontian was arrested and sent to the island of Sardinia. He resigned to make the election of a new pope possible.

Pope Hormisdas pope

Pope Hormisdas was Pope from 20 July 514 to his death in 523. His papacy was dominated by the Acacian schism, started in 484 by Acacius of Constantinople's efforts to placate the Monophysites. His efforts to resolve this schism were successful, and on 28 March 519, the reunion between Constantinople and Rome was ratified in the cathedral of Constantinople before a large crowd.

Pope Severinus pope

Pope Severinus was Pope two months, from 28 May until his death on 2 August. He became caught up in a power struggle with the Byzantine Emperor Heraclius over the ongoing Monothelite controversy.

Pope John V pope

Pope John V was Pope from 23 July 685 to his death in 686. He was the first pope of the Byzantine Papacy permitted to be consecrated without the prior consent of the Byzantine Emperor, and the first in a line of ten consecutive popes of Eastern origin. His papacy was marked by reconciliation between the city of Rome and the Empire.

Pope Conon pope

Pope Conon was Pope from 21 October 686 to his death in 687. He had been put forward as a compromise candidate, there being a conflict between the two factions resident in Rome— the military and the clerical. On his death, Conon was buried in the Patriarchal Basilica of St. Peter. He consecrated the Irish missionary Kilian a bishop and commissioned him to preach in Franconia.

Pope Adeodatus II pope

Pope Adeodatus II, also known as Deodatus II, was Pope from 11 April 672 to his death on 17 June 676. Little is known about him. Most surviving records indicate that Adeodatus was known for his generosity, especially when it came to the poor and to pilgrims. He was preceded by Vitalian and succeeded by Donus, and devoted much of his papacy to improving churches.

Deusdedit or Deodatus is the name of several ecclesiastical figures of the Middle Ages:

Timeline of the Catholic Church

As traditionally the oldest form of Christianity, along with the ancient or first millennial Orthodox Church, the non-Chalcedonian or Oriental Churches and the Church of the East, the history of the Roman Catholic Church is integral to the history of Christianity as a whole. It is also, according to church historian, Mark A. Noll, the "world's oldest continuously functioning international institution." This article covers a period of just under two thousand years.

History of the papacy aspect of history

The history of the papacy, the office held by the pope as head of the Roman Catholic Church, according to Catholic doctrine, spans from the time of Peter to the present day.

Papal name the regnal name taken by the head of the Catholic Church

A papal name or pontificial name is the regnal name taken by a pope. Both the head of the Catholic Church, usually known as the Pope, and the Pope of the Coptic Orthodox Church of Alexandria choose papal names. As of 2013, Pope Francis is the Catholic Pope, and Tawadros II or Theodoros II is the Coptic Pope. This article discusses and lists the names of Catholic Popes; another article has a list of Coptic Orthodox Popes of Alexandria.

Ostrogothic Papacy

The Ostrogothic Papacy was a period from 493 to 537 where the papacy was strongly influenced by the Ostrogothic Kingdom, if the pope was not outright appointed by the Ostrogothic King. The selection and administration of popes during this period was strongly influenced by Theodoric the Great and his successors Athalaric and Theodahad. This period terminated with Justinian I's (re)conquest of Rome during the Gothic War (535–554), inaugurating the Byzantine Papacy (537-752).

The papal election of 1086 ended with the election of Desiderus, abbot of Monte Cassino as Pope Gregory VII's successor after a year-long period of sede vacante.

Extraordinary Jubilee of Mercy 27th Holy Year in the history of Catholic Church

The Extraordinary Jubilee of Mercy was a Roman Catholic period of prayer held from 8 December 2015, the Feast of the Immaculate Conception, to 20 November 2016, the Feast of Christ the King. Like previous jubilees, it was seen by the Church as a period for remission of sins and universal pardon focusing particularly on God's forgiveness and mercy. It was an extraordinary Jubilee because it had not been predetermined long before; ordinary jubilees are usually celebrated every 25 years.

References

  1. In Latin, the name "Deodatus" means Given by God, while "Deusdedit" means God Has Given; both are now considered variants of the same name)
  2. Jeffrey Richards, The Popes and the Papacy in the Early Middle Ages (London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1979), p. 262
  3. “Pope Saint Adeodatus I”. New Catholic Dictionary. CatholicSaints.Info. 27 July 2012
  4. 1 2 Wikisource-logo.svg Herbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "Pope St. Deusdedit"  . Catholic Encyclopedia . New York: Robert Appleton Company.
  5. "Pope St. Deusdedit", Faith ND, Notre Dame University
  6. Richards, Popes and the papacy, p. 263
  7. Philips, Fr Andrew. "The Holy Orthodox Popes of Rome". orthodoxengland.org.uk. Retrieved 2018-03-17.
Catholic Church titles
Preceded by
Boniface IV
Pope
615–618
Succeeded by
Boniface V