Pope Adeodatus II

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Pope Saint

Adeodatus II
Pope Adeodatus II.jpg
Papacy began11 April 672
Papacy ended17 June 676
Predecessor Vitalian
Successor Donus
Personal details
Born Rome, Byzantine Empire
Died(676-06-17)17 June 676
Rome, Byzantine Empire
Other popes named Adeodatus
Pope Saint Adeodatus II
Pope
Born Rome, Byzantine Empire
Died(676-06-17)17 June 676
Rome, Byzantine Empire
Venerated in Catholic Church (Other Catholics Only)
Feast ????????
Attributes Papal Tiara

Pope Adeodatus II (died 17 June 676), also known as Deodatus II, [1] was Pope from 11 April 672 to his death on 17 June 676. [2] Little is known about him. Most surviving records indicate that Adeodatus was known for his generosity, especially when it came to the poor and to pilgrims. He was preceded by Vitalian and succeeded by Donus, and devoted much of his papacy to improving churches.

Pope leader of the Catholic Church

The pope, also known as the supreme pontiff, is the Bishop of Rome and ex officio leader of the worldwide Roman Catholic Church. Since 1929, the pope has also been head of state of Vatican City, a city-state enclaved within Rome, Italy. The current pope is Francis, who was elected on 13 March 2013, succeeding Benedict XVI.

Pope Vitalian pope

Pope Vitalian reigned from 30 July 657 to his death in 672. He was born in Segni, Lazio, the son of Anastasius.

Pope Donus pope

Pope Donus was Pope from 2 November 676 to his death in 678. He was the son of a Roman named Mauricius. Few details survive about the person or achievements of Donus, beyond what is recorded in the Liber Pontificalis.

Contents

Biography

Born in Rome, he became an Order of Saint Benedict monk of the Roman cloister of St Erasmus on the Caelian Hill. He was active in improving monastic discipline and in the repression of Monothelitism and gave Venice the right to choose the doge itself. During his pontificate the basilica of St. Pietro at the eight milestone of Via Portuense. St Erasmus was also reconstructed. [3] Elected as Pope on 11 April 672, Adeodatus II did not get involved in political events and disengaged himself from the events at the time surrounding monothelitism. [4]

Rome Capital city and comune in Italy

Rome is the capital city and a special comune of Italy. Rome also serves as the capital of the Lazio region. With 2,872,800 residents in 1,285 km2 (496.1 sq mi), it is also the country's most populated comune. It is the fourth most populous city in the European Union by population within city limits. It is the centre of the Metropolitan City of Rome, which has a population of 4,355,725 residents, thus making it the most populous metropolitan city in Italy. Rome is located in the central-western portion of the Italian Peninsula, within Lazio (Latium), along the shores of the Tiber. The Vatican City is an independent country inside the city boundaries of Rome, the only existing example of a country within a city: for this reason Rome has been often defined as capital of two states.

The Caelian Hill is one of the famous Seven Hills of Rome, Italy.

Monothelitism

Monothelitism or monotheletism is a particular teaching about how the divine and human relate in the person of Jesus. The Christological doctrine formally emerged in Armenia and Syria in 629. Specifically, monothelitism is the view that Jesus Christ has two natures but only one will. That is contrary to the Christology that Jesus Christ has two wills that correspond to his two natures (dyothelitism). Monothelitism is a development of the Neo-Chalcedonian position in the Christological debates. Formulated in 638, it enjoyed considerable popularity, even garnering patriarchal support, before being rejected and denounced as heretical in 681, at the Third Council of Constantinople.

Pope Adeodatus II devoted his reign to the restoration of churches in disrepair. He protected the Abbey of St. Peter and St. Paul (known as St. Augustine's Abbey), exempted Marmoutier Abbey, Tours (Abbey of St. Martin of Tours) from the authority of the Holy See, and led improvements to St. Erasmus' monastery. He is sometimes referred to with the title Saint and 26 June is attributed as his feast day, but this is disputed. [4] When his papacy began, Adeodatus II was already an elderly man, and even though he reigned for four years, it is considered that his papacy did not contribute by a large amount to society. Pope Adeodatus II died on 17 June 676. [4]

Marmoutier Abbey, Tours early monastery outside Tours, Indre-et-Loire, France

Marmoutier Abbey — also known as the Abbey of Marmoutier or Marmoutiers — was an early monastery outside Tours, Indre-et-Loire, France. In its later days it followed the Benedictine order as an influential monastery with many dependencies.

Martin of Tours Christian saint

Saint Martin of Tours was the third bishop of Tours. He has become one of the most familiar and recognizable Christian saints in Western tradition.

See also

Notes

  1. Some authors omit the number as they refer to Pope Adeodatus I as Pope Deusdedit.
  2. Shahan, Thomas (1907). "Pope St. Adeodatus" in The Catholic Encyclopedia. Vol. 1. New York: Robert Appleton Company.
  3. Kelly, J N D (2010). A Dictionary of Popes. Oxford University Press. p. 74. ISBN   978-0-19-929581-4.
  4. 1 2 3 "Adeodatus II". Encyclopædia Britannica. Retrieved 3 August 2015.

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References

<i>Catholic Encyclopedia</i> English-language encyclopedia

The Catholic Encyclopedia: An International Work of Reference on the Constitution, Doctrine, Discipline, and History of the Catholic Church, also referred to as the Old Catholic Encyclopedia and the Original Catholic Encyclopedia, is an English-language encyclopedia published in the United States and designed to serve the Roman Catholic Church. The first volume appeared in March 1907 and the last three volumes appeared in 1912, followed by a master index volume in 1914 and later supplementary volumes. It was designed "to give its readers full and authoritative information on the entire cycle of Catholic interests, action and doctrine".

Catholic Church titles
Preceded by
Vitalian
Pope
672–676
Succeeded by
Donus