Pope Eutychian

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Pope Saint

Eutychian
Eutychian.jpg
Papacy began4 January 275
Papacy ended7 December 283
Predecessor Felix I
Successor Caius
Personal details
Birth nameEutychianus
Born Tuscany [1]
Died(283-12-07)7 December 283
Rome, Roman Empire
Sainthood
Feast day8 December

Pope Eutychian (died 7 December 283), also called Eutychianus, was the Bishop of Rome from 4 January 275 to his death in 283. [2] [3]

Contents

Biography

His original epitaph was discovered in the catacomb of Callixtus (see Kraus, Roma sotterranea, p. 154 et seq.), but almost nothing more is known of him. Even the date of his reign is uncertain. Liber Pontificalis gives a reign of 8 years and 11 months, from 275 to 283. Eusebius, on the other hand says his reign was only 10 months. [3]

Catacomb of Callixtus catacomb in Rome

The Catacomb(s) of Callixtus is one of the Catacombs of Rome on the Appian Way, most notable for containing the Crypt of the Popes, which once contained the tombs of several popes from the 2nd to 4th centuries.

Franz Xaver Kraus was a German Catholic priest, and ecclesiastical and art historian.

<i>Liber Pontificalis</i> Book of biographies of popes

The Liber Pontificalis is a book of biographies of popes from Saint Peter until the 15th century. The original publication of the Liber Pontificalis stopped with Pope Adrian II (867–872) or Pope Stephen V (885–891), but it was later supplemented in a different style until Pope Eugene IV (1431–1447) and then Pope Pius II (1458–1464). Although quoted virtually uncritically from the 8th to 18th centuries, the Liber Pontificalis has undergone intense modern scholarly scrutiny. The work of the French priest Louis Duchesne, and of others has highlighted some of the underlying redactional motivations of different sections, though such interests are so disparate and varied as to render improbable one popularizer's claim that it is an "unofficial instrument of pontifical propaganda."

Eutychian is said to have allowed the blessing of grapes and beans on the altar and to have buried 324 martyrs with his own hands. Some historians doubt these traditions, since there was no persecution of Christians after the death of Aurelian in 275 and blessing the produce of the fields is believed to belong to a later period. [4]

Persecution of Christians Persecution of Christians

The persecution of Christians can be historically traced from the first century of the Christian era to the present day. Early Christians were persecuted for their faith at the hands of both the Jews from whose religion Christianity arose and the Romans who controlled many of the lands across which early Christianity was spread. Early in the fourth century, a form of the religion was legalized by the Edict of Milan, and it eventually became the State church of the Roman Empire.

Aurelian Roman Emperor

Aurelian was Roman Emperor from 270 to 275. Born in humble circumstances, he rose through the military ranks to become emperor. During his reign, he defeated the Alamanni after a devastating war. He also defeated the Goths, Vandals, Juthungi, Sarmatians, and Carpi. Aurelian restored the Empire's eastern provinces after his conquest of the Palmyrene Empire in 273. The following year he conquered the Gallic Empire in the west, reuniting the Empire in its entirety. He was also responsible for the construction of the Aurelian Walls in Rome, and the abandonment of the province of Dacia.

His feast is kept on 8 December. [3]

See also

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References

  1. The Editors of Encyclopædia Britannica. "Saint Eutychian". Encyclopædia Britannica. Retrieved 16 August 2016.
  2. Annuario Pontificio, 2012.
  3. 1 2 3 Wikisource-logo.svg Kirsch, Johann Peter (1909). "Pope St. Eutychianus"  . In Herbermann, Charles (ed.). Catholic Encyclopedia . 5. New York: Robert Appleton Company.
  4. Wikisource-logo.svg  One or more of the preceding sentences incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain : Kirsch, Johann Peter (1909). "Pope St. Eutychianus"  . In Herbermann, Charles (ed.). Catholic Encyclopedia . 5. New York: Robert Appleton.
Titles of the Great Christian Church
Preceded by
Felix I
Bishop of Rome
Pope

275–283
Succeeded by
Caius