Pope Evaristus

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Pope Saint

Evaristus
Bishop of Rome
Diocese Rome
See Rome
Papacy beganc. 99
Papacy endedc. 107
Predecessor Clement I
Successor Alexander I
Personal details
Born17 April 44
Bethlehem, Judea
Diedc. 107
Rome, Roman Empire
Sainthood
Feast day26 October

Pope Evaristus was the bishop of Rome from c. 99 to his death c. 107. [1] [2] He was also known as Aristus. He is venerated as a saint in the Eastern Orthodox Church, [3] the Catholic Church, and Oriental Orthodoxy. He is usually accorded the title of martyr; however, there is no confirmation of this. It is likely that he was the bishop of Rome when John the Apostle died, marking the end of the Apostolic Age.

Contents

Biography

Little is known about Evaristus. According to the Liber Pontificalis , he came from a family of Greek Jews living in Bethlehem. [4] He was elected during the reign of the Roman emperor Trajan, and succeeded Clement I in the See of Rome.

Eusebius, in his Church History IV, I, stated that Evaristus died in the 12th year of the reign of Emperor Trajan after holding the office of bishop of the Romans for eight years. He is said by the Liber Pontificalis to have divided Rome into several titles, assigning a priest to each, and appointed seven deacons for the city.

He is usually accorded the title of martyr; however, there is no confirmation of this[ citation needed ], [5] [6] as Pope Evaristus is listed without that title in the Roman Martyrology, with a feast day on 26 October. [7] It is probable that Evaristus was buried near Saint Peter's tomb in the Vatican. [8] It is also probable that John the Apostle died during the beginning of Evaristus' reign.

See also

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References

  1. Herbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "Pope St. Evaristus"  . Catholic Encyclopedia . New York: Robert Appleton Company.
  2. According to Annuario Pontificio , he died in 108.
  3. Orthodox England - The Holy Orthodox Popes of Rome
  4. Anastasius (bibliothecarius) (1602). Bibliothecarii Historia, de vitis romanorvm pontificvm a b.Petro apostolo vsqve ad Nicolavm I. nunquam hactenus typis excusa. Deinde Vita Hadriani II. et Stephani VI. auctore Gvilielmo Bibliothecario. Ex bibliotheca Marci Velseri ... Accessere variae lectiones, partim ex codie. mss. Biblioth. vaticanae, partim ex conciliorum tomis, Annalibus ecclesiast. Caes. Baronij ... exceptae. in typographeio I. Albini. p. 3. 1 Euaristus, natione Grecus, ex patre Iudaeo nomine Iuda, de ciuitate Bethleem, sedit ann. VIIII m. X d. II. Fuit autem temporibus Domitiani et Neruae Traiani, a consulatu Valentis et Veteris (96) usque ad Gallo et Bradua consulibus (108). Martyrio coronatur. 2 Hic titulos in urbe Roma diuidit presbiteris et VII diaconos ordinauit qui custodirent episcopum praedicantem, propter stilum ueritatis. 3 Hic fecit ordinationes III per mens. Decemb., presbiteros XVII, diaconos II; episcopos per diuersa loca XV. Qui etiam sepultus est iuxta corpus beati Petri, in Vaticanum, VI kal. Nouemb. Et cessauit episcopatus dies XVIIII.
  5. "Commemoration of Pope Saint Evaristus, Martyr - Proper of the Holy Mass". Archived from the original on October 15, 2019.
  6. Alexis-François Artaud de Montor (1911). The lives and times of the popes : including the complete gallery of the portraits of the pontiffs reproduced from "Effigies pontificum romanorum Dominici Basae": being a series of volumes giving the history of the world during the Christian era. archive.org . p.  21. Archived from the original on October 15, 2019. Quote: "Ignatius died of the wounds that were inflicted by ferocious beasts; Evaristus died under the hands of executioners, more cruel than the wild beasts themselves."
  7. "Martyrologium Romanum" (Libreria Editrice Vaticana 2001 ISBN   88-209-7210-7)
  8. Catholic Online. "St. Evaristus".
Catholic Church titles
Preceded by
Clement I
Bishop of Rome
Pope

98–105
Succeeded by
Alexander I