Pope Romanus

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Pope

Romanus
Pope Romanus Illustration.jpg
Papacy beganAugust 897
Papacy endedNovember 897
Predecessor Stephen VI
Successor Theodore II
Orders
Created cardinal867
by Pope Nicholas I
Personal details
Birth nameRomano Marini
Born Gallese, Papal States
DiedNovember 897

Pope Romanus (died November 897) was Pope from August to November 897.

Contents

Early life

Romanus was the supposed nephew of Pope Marinus I. [1] Romanus, whose personal name is unknown, was born in Gallese, Italy near Civita Castellana. Romanus was son of Constantine.[ who? ] He was installed as the cardinal of St. Peter ad Vincula prior to his election to the papacy. [2]

Papacy

Romanus was elected to succeed the murdered Pope Stephen VI during a period when the papacy was fought over by various Italian factions. [3] Pope Stephen VI was murdered after exhuming Pope Formosus's corpse for the posthumous Cadaver Synod, [4] in which Stephen VI put charges to Formosus' "propped up" body. Romanus annulled all the acts and decrees of his predecessor. [3]

During his short reign, he granted the Farfa Abbey Abbot Vitalis the pallium (a vestment in the Catholic Church), and appointed Vitalis as the patriarch of Grado. Romanus also confirmed the possessions of the Spanish bishops of Girona and Elna of their sees. [2] His short rule was regarded as a virtuous one by contemporary historian Flodoard, [2] but 15th-century historian Bartolomeo Platina scorned him for continuing the practice of annulling the acts and decrees of his predecessor. [3]

Death

Romanus died in November 897 of an unknown cause, however it is believed that he could have been deposed by supporters of his predecessor Pope Stephen VI, who was of an opposing faction. [4] This belief is due to the description that "he was made a monk" , which was often used at the time to describe deposition. [2]

See also

Notes

  1. Anura Guruge (16 February 2010). The Next Pope (illustrated ed.). p. 88. ISBN   9780615353722.
  2. 1 2 3 4 Mann, Horace. "Pope Romanus." The Catholic Encyclopedia Vol. 13. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1912. 22 September 2017
  3. 1 2 3 Platina, Bartolomeo (1479), The Lives of the Popes From The Time Of Our Saviour Jesus Christ to the Accession of Gregory VII, I, London: Griffith Farran & Co., p. 239, retrieved 25 April 2013
  4. 1 2 "Romanus". Encyclopædia Britannica. Retrieved 3 August 2015.

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References

Catholic Church titles
Preceded by
Stephen VI
Pope
897
Succeeded by
Theodore II