Poppoya

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Poppoya
Poppoya.jpg
Theatrical poster for Poppoya (1999)
Directed by Yasuo Furuhata [1]
Produced byJun'ichi Shindō
Tan Takaiwa
Written by Jirō Asada (novel)
Yoshiki Iwama (screenplay)
Starring Ken Takakura
Music byRyoichi Kuniyoshi
Ryuichi Sakamoto
CinematographyDaisaku Kimura
Edited byKiyoaki Saitō
Distributed by Toei Company
Release date
5 June 1999
Running time
112 minutes
Country Japan
Language Japanese
Box office¥3.49 billion [2] ($30.6 million) [3]

Poppoya (鉄道員, Poppoya / Tetsudōin, "Railwayman") is a 1999 Japanese film directed by Yasuo Furuhata. It was Japan's submission to the 72nd Academy Awards for the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film, but was not accepted as a nominee. [4] It was chosen as Best Film at the Japan Academy Prize ceremony. [5] The film was the third-highest-grossing film of the year in Japan.

Contents

Synopsis

A railway station master at a dying end-of-the-line village in Hokkaido is haunted by memories of his dead wife and daughter. When the line serving the village is scheduled for closure, an erstwhile colleague offers him a job at a resort hotel, but he is emotionally unable to part with his career as a railwayman. His life takes a turn when he meets a young woman with an interest in trains who resembles his daughter. [6]

Cast

See also

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References

  1. Infobox data from 鉄道員 (in Japanese). Japanese Movie Database . Retrieved 16 May 2009.and Poppoya (1999) at IMDb
  2. "邦画興行収入ランキング". SF MOVIE DataBank (in Japanese). General Works. Retrieved 19 February 2019.
  3. "Official exchange rate (LCU per US$, period average) - Japan". World Bank . 1999. Retrieved 7 May 2020.
  4. "List of Japanese films nominated for Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film" (in Japanese). Motion Picture Producers Association of Japan. Retrieved 22 June 2008.
  5. "Awards for Poppoya (1999)" (in Japanese). Internet Movie Database . Retrieved 5 May 2009.
  6. based on Poppoya at AllMovie