Poptong County

Last updated
Pŏptong County
법동군
County
Korean transcription(s)
   Chosŏn'gŭl
   Hancha
   McCune-Reischauer Pŏptong-gun
   Revised Romanization Beopdong-gun
NK-Gangwon-Beopdong.png
Country North Korea
Province Kangwŏn Province
Administrative divisions 1 ŭp, 19 ri

Pŏptong County is a kun in the Kangwŏn province, North Korea.

Administrative divisions of North Korea

The administrative divisions of North Korea are organized into three hierarchical levels. These divisions were discovered in 2002. Many of the units have equivalents in the system of South Korea. At the highest level are nine provinces, two directly governed cities, and three special administrative divisions. The second-level divisions are cities, counties, wards, and districts. These are further subdivided into third-level entities: towns, neighborhoods, villages, and workers' districts.

Kangwon Province (North Korea) Province in North Korea

Kangwon Province is a province of North Korea, with its capital at Wŏnsan. Before the division of Korea in 1945, Kangwŏn Province and its South Korean neighbour Gangwon Province formed a single province that excluded Wŏnsan.

North Korea Sovereign state in East Asia

North Korea, officially the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, is a country in East Asia constituting the northern part of the Korean Peninsula, with Pyongyang the capital and the largest city in the country. To the north and northwest, the country is bordered by China and by Russia along the Amnok and Tumen rivers and to the south it is bordered by South Korea, with the heavily fortified Korean Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) separating the two. Nevertheless, North Korea, like its southern counterpart, claims to be the legitimate government of the entire peninsula and adjacent islands.

Contents

Geography

It lies between the Masingryŏng and Ahobiryŏng ranges, and 90% of the county is more than 400 meters above sea level. The highest point is Turyusan. Only 5% of this rugged county consists of ground level. The chief streams are the Rimjin River, Komitanch'ŏn, and Tongdongch'ŏn (통동천). There are abundant forests. The climate is cold and continental.

The Ahobiryong Mountains are a mountain range stretching from north to south in central North Korea. The range straddles the border between North Hwanghae and Kangwon provinces. The most famous part of the range is located near Kaesong, the ancient capital of the Koryo dynasty, located in North Hwanghaew; because of its natural beauty, it is sometimes called the "Kumgangsan" of Kaesong.

Imjin River river in North Korea

The Imjin River or Rimjin River is the 7th largest river in Korea. It flows from north to south, crossing the Demilitarized Zone and joining the Han River downstream of Seoul, near the Yellow Sea. The river is not the namesake of the Imjin Waeran Japanese invasions of Korea in the late 16th century.

The Eurasian otters living in the county are recognized as North Korean natural monument number 249.

Eurasian otter species of otter

The Eurasian otter, also known as the European otter, Eurasian river otter, common otter, and Old World otter, is a semiaquatic mammal native to Eurasia. The most widely distributed member of the otter subfamily (Lutrinae) of the weasel family (Mustelidae), it is found in the waterways and coasts of Europe, many parts of Asia, and parts of northern Africa. The Eurasian otter has a diet mainly of fish, and is strongly territorial. It is endangered in parts of its range, but recovering in others.

Administrative divisions

Pŏptong county is divided into 1 ŭp (town) and 19 ri (villages):

  • Pŏptong-ŭp
  • Chaktong-ri
  • Changal-li
  • Ch'uam-ri
  • Haerang-ri
  • Kamdul-li
  • Kŏnja-ri
  • Kŭmgu-ri
  • Kŭmp'yŏng-ri
  • Kuryong-ri
  • Majŏl-li
  • Ŏyu-ri
  • Paeg'il-li
  • Rotal-li
  • Ryŏngjŏ-ri
  • Ryongp'o-ri
  • Ryuldong-ri
  • Sangsŏ-ri
  • Toch'al-li
  • Yŏhae-ri

Economy

The local economy is dominated by manufacturing and mining. Goods produced include disposable goods, machines, medicine, chemicals, and paper. The matches manufactured here are sold throughout North Korea. Although only 6.5% of the county's land is arable, the county does produce some maize. Livestock are also raised in the county, which has long been known as a centre for honey production as well.

Maize Cereal grain

Maize, also known as corn, is a cereal grain first domesticated by indigenous peoples in southern Mexico about 10,000 years ago. The leafy stalk of the plant produces pollen inflorescences and separate ovuliferous inflorescences called ears that yield kernels or seeds, which are fruits.

Transportation

Pŏptong is served by roads, but not by rail.

See also

Geography of North Korea

North Korea is located in East Asia on the Northern half of the Korean Peninsula.

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