Popular music of Vietnam

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Pham Duy (1921-2013), most prolific songwriter of Vietnam. With a musical career that spanned more than 70 years through some of the most turbulent periods of Vietnamese history and with more than 1000 songs to his credit Phamduydan.jpg
Phạm Duy (1921-2013), most prolific songwriter of Vietnam. With a musical career that spanned more than 70 years through some of the most turbulent periods of Vietnamese history and with more than 1000 songs to his credit

The Western-influenced popular music of Vietnam (Tân nhạc Việt Nam, "New music of Vietnam") developed from the 1940s–1980s.

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Singers, songwriters and singer-songwriters

The Vietnam War and the plight of Vietnamese refugees inspired a collection of musical pieces that have become "classical" anthems among Vietnamese people both in Vietnam and abroad.

There are many notable songwriters including the nicknamed three 'fathers' of popular music. They are Lam Phương (b. 1937), who is best known for his love songs and ballads, traditional Cải lương, and Vietnamese patriotic music, Phạm Duy (b. 1921), and Trịnh Công Sơn (b. 1939), known as the "Bob Dylan of Vietnam" whose songs were sung by Khánh Ly. [1] [2] [3] Other notable songwriters include Văn Cao (b. 1923), a Vietnamese composer whose works include "Tiến Quân Ca", which became the national anthem of Vietnam, Dương Thụ (b. 1943), and Phú Quang (b. 1949), an influential Vietnamese composer primarily known for his love songs and songs about Hanoi.

Modern Music

The songwriters of the 1970s are now "easy listening" for the middle aged, while the modern TV scene is dominated by Japanese-, Korean- and Cantopop influenced V-pop shows like Vietnam Idol .

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Music of Vietnam music and musical traditions of Vietnam

Traditional Vietnamese music encompasses a large umbrella of Vietnamese music from antiquity to present times, and can also encompass multiple groups, such as those from Vietnam's ethnic minority tribes. Throughout its history, Vietnam has been most heavily influenced by traditional Chinese music, alongside with Korea, Mongolia and Japan.

Văn Cao was a Vietnamese composer whose works include "Tiến Quân Ca", which became the national anthem of Vietnam. He, along with Phạm Duy and Trịnh Công Sơn, is widely considered one of the three most salient figures of modern (non-classical) Vietnamese music. He was also a noted poet and a painter.

Phạm is the fourth most common Vietnamese family name.

Nguyễn Phú Quang, known popularly simply as Phú Quang, is an influential Vietnamese composer, primarily known for his love songs and songs about Hanoi. He also writes symphonies, concertos, as well as film scores and soundtracks.

Hồng Nhung Vietnamese musician

Lê Hồng Nhung is a Vietnamese singer. She is a top-ranking singer of Vietnamese contemporary music and has great achievements in the successful innovation of Vietnamese music since the 1990s. Nhung is also known for her many performances of Trịnh Công Sơn's songs. She is one of the four divas of Vietnam. Through music, she has brought great inspiration and musical creativity to later generations'singers, including Mỹ Tâm, Tùng Dương, Uyên Linh, Noo Phước Thịnh and Vũ Cát Tường.

Phạm Duy Prolific Vietnamese songwriter

Phạm Duy was Vietnam's most prolific songwriter. With a musical career that spanned more than seven decades through some of the most turbulent periods of Vietnamese history and with more than one thousand songs to his credit, he is widely considered one of the three most salient and influential figures of modern Vietnamese music, along with Văn Cao and Trịnh Công Sơn. His music is noted for combining elements of traditional music with new methods, creating melodies that are both modern and traditional. A politically polarizing figure, his entire body of work was banned in North Vietnam during the Vietnam War and subsequently in unified Vietnam for more than 30 years until the government began to ease restrictions on some of his work upon his repatriation in 2005.

Khánh Ly is a Vietnamese singer. She performed many songs written by Vietnamese composer Trịnh Công Sơn and rose to fame in the 1960s. Her last name was changed to Nguyễn following her marriage to South Vietnam journalist Nguyễn Hoàng Đoan in 1975.

Phạm Phú Quốc South Vietnamese military pilot

Phạm Phú Quốc (1935–1965) was a French-trained South Vietnamese flying ace and lieutenant in the Republic of Vietnam Air Force, best known for being one of two mutinous pilots involved in the 1962 South Vietnamese Presidential Palace bombing on February 27, 1962, which aimed to assassinate President Ngô Đình Diệm and his immediate family, who were his political advisers.

Lang Van

Lang Van is a Vietnamese production company based in Westminster, CA and Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.

V-pop, an abbreviation for Vietnamese pop, a musical genre covering Vietnamese music from the 1990s to present day.

Duy is a masculine Vietnamese given name. Notable people with the name include:

Đỗ Nhuận was a Vietnamese classical composer. He is known for the first homegrown Vietnamese opera - Cô Sao "Miss Sao." This and other more-or-less revolutionary themed musicals were premiered by the VNOB at the Hanoi Opera House. During the late 60s he was highly critical of the "pop" music of songwriters in the South such as Phạm Duy. He was later General Secretary of the Vietnam Musicians' Association. He was a recipient of the Hồ Chí Minh Prize.

The trường ca "long song", is a lyrical genre of Vietnamese song and poetry. The term trường ca in Vietnamese applies both to poetry - including the European epos, or Epic poem, but secondly also to a specific Vietnamese song genre which is a development of both European and traditional Vietnamese models. Notable exponents of the song genre include the three masters of the 1960s and 1970s, Văn Cao, Phạm Duy and Trịnh Công Sơn who wrote long lyrics with the intention not of poems to be read, but to be sung. An example of French references is found in Trịnh Công Sơn's trường ca, using the image of a tireless sand crab, which draws on Camus' The Myth of Sisyphus to make a Vietnamese lament-ballad.

Bùi Thị Oanh, also known by the stage name Lệ Thu, is a Vietnamese female singer. She was well known in South Vietnam in the 1970s for singing the songs of singer-songwriters such as Trịnh Công Sơn and Phạm Duy.

Hoàng Thi Thơ was a Vietnamese songwriter popular in the 1950s and '60s. He was part of the musical diaspora which emigrated to Orange County, California.

Thái Thanh Vietnamese singer

Thái Thanh was a Vietnamese-American singer. She was one of the most iconic singers of the Western-influenced popular music in Vietnam, known as 'New music of Vietnam '.

Huỳnh Kim Chi, also known by the stage name Hoàng Oanh, is a Vietnamese singer. Born in Mỹ Tho, she was popular during the 1970s before the Fall of Saigon, then emigrated to the United States. She is still popular among Vietnamese overseas as a singer of traditional music.

Nguyễn Văn Diệp, stage name Duy Khánh was a Vietnamese songwriter. He was one of the many singers and songwriters to settle in "Quận Cam" after the Fall of Saigon.

Vietnamese exiled music, also called Vietnamese diasporic music, refers to the Vietnamese music brought overseas, especially to the United States and France by the forced migration of Vietnamese artists after the Fall of Saigon in 1975.

References

  1. John Shepherd Continuum encyclopedia of popular music of the world: Volumes 3-7 - 2005
  2. Phạm Duy. 1975. Musics of Vietnam
  3. Olsen Popular Music of Vietnam 5 Sep 2010 – Popular Music of Vietnam: The Politics of Remembering, the Economics of Forgetting by Dale A.Olsen Routledge, New York, London, 2008