Prathama (day)

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Prathama is the Sanskrit word for "first", and is the first day in the lunar fortnight ( Paksha ) of the Hindu calendar. Prathama is also known as Pratipada in West Bengal, Odisha and western India (Maharashtra, Konkan, and Goa). Each month has two Prathama days, being the first day of the "bright" (Shukla) and of the "dark" (Krishna) fortnights respectively. Thus Prathama occurs on the first and the sixteenth day of each month. It is also known as Pratipad or Pratipada.

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