Premier of Quebec

Last updated
Premier of Quebec
Premier ministre du Québec
Coat of arms of Quebec.svg
Flag of Quebec.svg
Incumbent
François Legault

since October 18, 2018
Office of the Premier
Style
Status Head of Government
Member of
Reports to
Residence Edifice Price (Price Building)
Seat Quebec City
Appointer Lieutenant Governor of Quebec
with the confidence of the Quebec Legislature
Term length At Her Majesty's pleasure
contingent on the premier's ability to command confidence in the legislative assembly
FormationJuly 15, 1867 [1]
First holder Pierre-Joseph-Olivier Chauveau
Deputy Deputy Premier of Quebec
SalaryCA$90,850 plus CA$95,393 (indemnity and allowances) [2]
Website Premier of Official Site

The Premier of Quebec (French: Premier ministre du Québec (masculine) or Première ministre du Québec (feminine)) is the head of government of the Canadian province of Quebec. The current Premier of Quebec is François Legault of the Coalition Avenir Québec, sworn in on October 18, 2018 following the 2018 election.

Contents

Selection and qualifications

The Premier of Quebec is appointed as president of the Executive Council by the Lieutenant Governor of Quebec, the viceregal representative of the Queen in Right of Quebec. The Premier is most usually the head of the party winning the most seats in the National Assembly of Quebec, and is normally a sitting member of the National Assembly. An exception to this rule occurs when the winning party's leader fails to win the riding in which he or she is running. In that case, the premier would have to attain a seat by winning a by-election. This has happened, for example, to Robert Bourassa in 1985.

The role of the Premier of Quebec is to set the legislative priorities on the opening speech of the National Assembly. He or she represents the leading party and must have the confidence of the assembly, as expressed by votes on budgets and other matters considered as confidence votes.

The term "premier" is used in English, while French employs "premier ministre", which translates directly to "prime minister". In at least one instance, the term "Prime Minister of the Province of Quebec" was used in an English-language advertisement. [3] The term is also used for the Podium Ceremony of the annual Formula One Grand Prix du Canada in Montreal.

History

The Premiers of Quebec are chosen according to the principle of responsible government. This principle is a matter of constitutional convention, since the Constitution Act, 1867 does not mention it.

See also

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References

  1. "Nombre de premiers ministres et de gouvernements depuis 1867" (in French). National Assembly of Quebec. Archived from the original on March 10, 2014. Retrieved March 9, 2014.
  2. "Indemnities and Allowances - National Assembly of Québec". www.assnat.qc.ca. Archived from the original on 2016-10-01.
  3. "The St. Maurice Valley Chronicle - Google News Archive Search". news.google.com.