Prentice Hall

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Prentice Hall
Prentice Hall (logo).jpg
Parent company Pearson Education
Founded1913
FounderCharles Gerstenberg and Richard Ettinger
Country of origin United States
Headquarters location Upper Saddle River, New Jersey
Publication types Books
Official website prenticehall.com

Prentice Hall is a major educational publisher owned by Pearson plc. Prentice Hall publishes print and digital content for the 6–12 and higher-education market. Prentice Hall distributes its technical titles through the Safari Books Online e-reference service.

Pearson plc UK examination board and publishing company

Pearson plc is a British multinational publishing and education company headquartered in London. It was founded as a construction business in the 1840s but switched to publishing in the 1920s. It is the largest education company and was once the largest book publisher in the world. In 2013 Pearson merged its Penguin Books with German conglomerate Bertelsmann. In 2015 the company announced a change to focus solely on education. Pearson has a primary listing on the London Stock Exchange and is a constituent of the FTSE 100 Index. It has a secondary listing on the New York Stock Exchange in the form of American Depository Receipts.

Safari Books Online

Safari Books Online LLC is a digital library founded in July 2000 and headquartered in Sebastopol, California, with offices in Boston and Scottsdale. Safari characterizes itself as a "platform for technology and business learning".

Contents

History

On October 13, 1913, law professor Charles Gerstenberg and his student Richard Ettinger founded Prentice Hall. Gerstenberg and Ettinger took their mothers' maiden names—Prentice and Hall—to name their new company. [1]

Prentice Hall was acquired by Gulf+Western in 1984, and became part of that company's publishing division Simon & Schuster. [2] Publication of trade books ended in 1991 [3] . Simon & Schuster's educational division, including Prentice Hall, was sold to Pearson by G+W successor Viacom in 1998.

Simon & Schuster large English-language publisher

Simon & Schuster, Inc., a subsidiary of CBS Corporation, is an American publishing company founded in New York City in 1924 by Richard Simon and Max Schuster. As of 2016, Simon & Schuster was publishing 2,000 titles annually under 35 different imprints.

There were two or more authors that had contracts with Prentice Hall in the 1991 to 1995 period. Their books turned up missing when Pearson purchased the company. One book 'The Roof Builder's Handbook' is still being sold in 2018 for as much as $230 per new copy, but the author William C. McElroy was told by Pearson that all new books were either destroyed or went missing in 1995. Some 2,385 copies are missing. [4]

Notable titles

Prentice Hall is the publisher of Magruder's American Government as well as Biology by Ken Miller and Joe Levine. Their artificial intelligence series includes Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach by Stuart J. Russell and Peter Norvig and ANSI Common Lisp by Paul Graham. They also published the well-known computer programming book The C Programming Language by Brian Kernighan and Dennis Ritchie and Operating Systems: Design and Implementation by Andrew S. Tanenbaum. Other titles include Dennis Nolan's Big Pig (1976), Monster Bubbles: A Counting Book (1976), Alphabrutes (1977), Wizard McBean and his Flying Machine (1977), Witch Bazooza (1979), Llama Beans (1979, with author Charles Keller), and The Joy of Chickens (1981).

Kenneth R. Miller American biologist

Kenneth Raymond Miller is an American cell biologist and molecular biologist who is currently Professor of Biology and Royce Family Professor for Teaching Excellence at Brown University. Miller's primary research focus is the structure and function of cell membranes, especially chloroplast thylakoid membranes. Miller is a co-author of a major introductory college and high school biology textbook published by Prentice Hall since 1990. Miller, who is Roman Catholic, is opposed to creationism, including the intelligent design (ID) movement. He has written two books on the subject: Finding Darwin's God, which argues that acceptance of evolution is compatible with a belief in God; and Only a Theory, which explores ID and the Kitzmiller v. Dover Area School District case as well as its implications in science across America.

In computer science, artificial intelligence (AI), sometimes called machine intelligence, is intelligence demonstrated by machines, in contrast to the natural intelligence displayed by humans and animals. Computer science defines AI research as the study of "intelligent agents": any device that perceives its environment and takes actions that maximize its chance of successfully achieving its goals. Colloquially, the term "artificial intelligence" is used to describe machines that mimic "cognitive" functions that humans associate with other human minds, such as "learning" and "problem solving".

<i>Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach</i> book by Stuart J. Russell and Peter Norvig

Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach (AIMA) is a university textbook on artificial intelligence, written by Stuart J. Russell and Peter Norvig. It was first published in 1995 and the third edition of the book was released 11 December 2009. It is used in over 1350 universities worldwide and has been called "the most popular artificial intelligence textbook in the world". It is considered the standard text in the field of artificial intelligence.

In "personal computer" history

A Prentice Hall subsidiary, Reston Publishing, was in the foreground of technical-book publishing when microcomputers were first becoming available. It was still unclear who would be buying and using "personal computers," and the scarcity of useful software and instruction created a publishing market niche whose target audience yet had to be defined. In the spirit of the pioneers who made PCs possible, Reston Publishing's editors addressed non-technical users with the reassuring, and mildly experimental, Computer Anatomy for Beginners by Marlin Ouverson of People's Computer Company. They followed with a collection of books that was generally by and for programmers, building a stalwart list of titles relied on by many in the first generation of microcomputers users.

People's Computer Company (PCC) was an organization, a newsletter and, later, a quasiperiodical called the Dragonsmoke. PCC was founded and produced by Dennis Allison, Bob Albrecht and George Firedrake in Menlo Park, California in the early 1970s.

See also

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References

  1. "About Pearson Prentice Hall". Archived from the original on May 3, 2007. Retrieved 2007-05-23.
  2. Cole, Robert J. (1984-11-27). "Prentice Accepts $71 Bid by G.& W." The New York Times. ISSN   0362-4331 . Retrieved 2019-04-02.
  3. Cohen, Roger (1991-07-10). "THE MEDIA BUSINESS; Simon & Schuster to Absorb Prentice Hall Press Division". The New York Times. ISSN   0362-4331 . Retrieved 2018-01-13.
  4. William (Bill) C. McElroy author of the Roof Builder's Handbook, ISBN   0-13-781816-5