President of Cuba

Last updated
President of the Republic of Cuba
Presidente de la República de Cuba
Flag of the President of Cuba.svg
Official Standard
Miguel Diaz Canel.jpg
Incumbent
Miguel Díaz-Canel

since April 19, 2018 (as President of the Council of State until 10 October 2019)
Council of State
Style Mr. President (Informal)
His Excellency (In international correspondence)
Status Head of state
Head of government
Member of Council of Ministers
Residence Palacio de la Revolución
Appointer National Assembly of People's Power
Term length Five years, renewable once [1]
Inaugural holder Tomás Estrada Palma (1902)
Fidel Castro (1976 Constitution)
Formation1902
1976
Deputy First Vice President of the Council of State
Website https://www.presidencia.gob.cu/es/
Coat of Arms of Cuba.svg
This article is part of a series on the
politics and government of
Cuba
Flag of Cuba.svg Cubaportal

The President of the Republic of Cuba (Spanish : Presidente de la República de Cuba), is the head of state of Cuba. The office in its current form was established under the Constitution of 2019. The president is the second most powerful position, after the First Secretary of the Communist Party of Cuba. [2] Miguel Díaz-Canel became President of the Council of State on 19 April 2018, taking over from Raúl Castro, and has been President of the Republic since 10 October 2019.

Contents

The position of first secretary of the Communist Party of Cuba continues to be the most powerful political position in Cuba. Fidel Castro held both positions from 1976 to 2008, and Raúl Castro held both positions from 2011 to 2018. Raúl Castro continues to hold the position of first secretary.

History

Under the 1901 constitution, Cuba had a presidential system based on that of the United States.

In 1940, a new constitution reformed the government into a semi-presidential system, 18 years before its modern archetype – the French Fifth Republic – came into being.

On 2 December 1976, the executive was reformed again by a new national constitution, this time in emulation of the Soviet Union. The presidential office was abolished and replaced by a collective head of state, the Council of State, elected by the National Assembly of People's Power. However, unlike the USSR's arrangements, where the chairmen of the Presidium of the Supreme Soviet and the Council of Ministers were distinct posts, the chairman of the Council of State also chaired the Council of Ministers. Furthermore, unlike English and Russian, Spanish does not distinguish between the terms "chairman/председатель" and "president/президент", translating both as "presidente". Thus, when back-translated into English, the term used was not "Chairman" (on the precedent of similar institutions in countries whose languages have a chairman/president distinction, such as the USSR and East Germany), but rather "President", from the shared etymology with the Spanish "presidente".

On 24 February 2019, another constitution – Cuba's current – was adopted in a referendum. Under it, the government was again re-organized, and the posts of President and Prime Minister were restored. [3] This reorganization took effect on 11 October 2019. Díaz-Canel was President of the Council of State until 10 October 2019 and President of the Republic after that date. Under the new constitution, the position of President of the Council of State continues as a separate role, subordinate to President of the Republic.

In cases of the absence, illness or death of the President of the Council of State, a vice president assumes the President’s duties.

Powers

The president of Cuba has the power to:

  1. Propose to the National Assembly of People’s Power, once elected by that body, the members of the Council of Ministers
  2. Accept (based on personal preference) the resignation of the members of the Council of Ministers or propose either to the National Assembly of People’s Power or the Council of State the replacement of any of those members and, in both cases, to propose the corresponding substitutes
  3. Receive the credentials of the heads of delegation of foreign diplomatic missions. This responsibility may be delegated to any of the vice presidents of the Council of State;
  4. Assume the supreme command of all armed forces and determine their general organization
  5. Preside over the National Defense Council
  6. Declare a state emergency in those cases provided for in this Constitution, stating his decision, as soon as the circumstances permit it, to the National Assembly of People’s Power or to the Council of State if the Assembly is unable to meet, according to legal effects
  7. Sign decree-laws and other resolutions of the Council of State and the legal provisions adopted by the Council of Ministers or its executive committee, and arrange for their publication in the Official Gazette of the Republic
  8. Assume all other duties assigned it by the Constitution or by law.

List of presidents

See also

Related Research Articles

Cuba has had a socialist political system since 1959 based on the "one state – one party" principle. Cuba is constitutionally defined as a Marxist–Leninist socialist state guided by the political ideas of Karl Marx, one of the fathers of historical materialism, Friedrich Engels and Vladimir Lenin. The present Constitution also ascribes the role of the Communist Party of Cuba to be the "leading force of society and of the state" and as such has the capability of setting national policy. The most recent leader was Raúl Castro, who held the title of First Secretary of the Communist Party of Cuba, the most powerful position in Cuba. As of 2019 Miguel Díaz-Canel is now the President of Cuba and is likely to succeed Raúl Castro as First Secretary in 2021.

Raúl Castro First Secretary of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of Cuba

Raúl Modesto Castro Ruz is a Cuban politician who is currently serving as the First Secretary of the Communist Party of Cuba, the most senior position in the communist state, succeeding his brother Fidel Castro in April 2011. He has also been a member of the Politburo of the Communist Party of Cuba, the highest decision-making body since 1975. In February 2008, he was appointed the President of the Council of State and President of the Council of Ministers. He stepped down as President on 19 April 2018, but remains the first secretary of the Communist Party, still holding considerable influence over government policy.

Prime Minister of Cuba Head of the Council of Ministers of Cuba

The Prime Minister of Cuba, known as the President of the Council of Ministers between 1976 and 2019, is the head of the Council of Ministers of Cuba.

The 2006–2008 Cuban transfer of presidential duties was the handover of the title of president and presidential duties from longtime Cuban leader Fidel Castro to his brother Raúl Castro, the next-in-line-of-succession person in Cuba, following Fidel's operation and recovery from an undisclosed digestive illness believed to be diverticulitis. Although Raúl Castro exercised the duties of president, Fidel Castro retained the title of President of Cuba, formally the President of the Council of State of Cuba, during this period.

Carlos Lage Dávila is a Cuban politician. Until 2009, he was a Vice President of the Council of State of Cuba, a member of the Politburo of the Communist Party of Cuba, and Executive Secretary of the Council of Ministers of Cuba. Lage was described as Cuba's de facto prime minister.

The Cuban Revolution was the overthrow of Fulgencio Batista's regime by the 26th of July Movement and the establishment of a new Cuban government led by Fidel Castro in 1959.

2008 Cuban presidential election

An indirect presidential election was held in Cuba on 24 February 2008, in which the National Assembly of People's Power elected a new President of Cuba and the members of the Council of State. The election followed the January 2008 parliamentary election. In the election, Raúl Castro, who had been Acting President since July 2006, was elected as President, succeeding his older brother, Fidel Castro.

In March 2009, President Raúl Castro of Cuba dismissed numerous government ministers.

Cuba–Vietnam relations Diplomatic relations between the Republic of Cuba and the Socialist Republic of Viet Nam

Cuban–Vietnamese relations are the interstate relations between the Republic of Cuba and the Socialist Republic of Vietnam. The relations are based on trade, credits, and investments which have increased significantly since the 1990s and on shared ideological beliefs – they are both socialist states. Diplomatic relations between the two countries were established in December 1960. Since then, Vietnam has become Cuba's second-largest trading partner in Asia, with Vietnam trailing behind China.

Miguel Díaz-Canel 17th and current President of Cuba

Miguel Díaz-Canel is a Cuban politician currently serving as the President of Cuba since 2019. He was previously President of the Council of State from 2018 to 2019 and First Vice President from 2013 to 2018. He has been a member of the Politburo of the Communist Party of Cuba since 2003, and he served as Minister of Higher Education from 2009 to 2012; he was promoted to the post of Vice President of the Council of Ministers in 2012. A year later, on 24 February 2013, he was elected as First Vice President of the Council of State.

First Secretary of the Communist Party of Cuba Head of the Communist Party of Cuba and Leader of the Republic of Cuba

The First Secretary of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of Cuba is the highest office within the Communist Party of Cuba and is ranked first in the Politburo, the highest decision-making body in Cuba, which makes the office holder the most powerful person in Cuban government.

Politburo of the Communist Party of Cuba Wikimedia list article

The Politburo of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of Cuba is the party's highest decision-making body in between sessions of the Central Committee. The party's First Secretary chairs the body's meetings.

The following lists events that happened during 2016 in Cuba.

2018 Cuban parliamentary election

Parliamentary elections were held in Cuba on 11 March 2018 to elect members of the National Assembly of People's Power. Prior to the elections, President Raúl Castro declared he would not be seeking a new term, and a new President of the Council of State will be elected by the National Assembly. His deputy, Miguel Díaz-Canel, was subsequently elected as the new president. However, Castro remained the First Secretary of the Communist Party of Cuba, the most senior position in the country.

Events in the year 2018 in Cuba.

Salvador Valdés Mesa Cuban politician

Salvador Valdés Mesa is a Cuban politician and former trade union leader. He is the First Vice President of Cuba since April 2018 and is a member of the Political Bureau of the Communist Party of Cuba.

2019 Cuban constitutional referendum

A constitutional referendum was held in Cuba on 24 February 2019. Voters were asked whether they approved of a new constitution passed by the National Assembly of People's Power in July 2018. The reforms were approved, with 90.61% of valid votes cast in favour. The new Constitution came into force on 10 April 2019 after it was proclaimed in the Cuban National Assembly and published in the Official Gazette of the Republic.

Events in the year 2019 in Cuba.

First Lady of Cuba

First Lady of Cuba is de facto title of the spouse of the president of the Republic of Cuba.

Manuel Marrero Cruz also known as Manuel Marrero is a Cuban politician currently serving as the 17th Prime Minister of Cuba, and the first since Cuba resurrected the office of the Prime Minister in December 2019 after the 43-year abolishment of the position from 1976 to 2019. The last Prime Minister before the abolishment in 1976 was Fidel Castro.

References

  1. "Raul Castro says Cuba needs term limits for its leaders" . Retrieved 2016-09-07.
  2. "Raul Castro to lead Cuba's Communist Party until 2021". FRANCE 24. 19 April 2018. "I confirm to this assembly that Raul Castro, as first secretary of the Communist Party, will lead the decisions about the future of the country," Diaz-Canel said.
  3. Mimi Whitefield (February 25, 2019). "Cuba approves new constitution: What changes, what doesn't?". Miami Herald. Retrieved February 25, 2019.