President of South Ossetia

Last updated
President of the Republic of South Ossetia
Coat of arms of South Ossetia.svg
Anatoliy Bibilov EO.png
Incumbent
Anatoly Bibilov

since 21 April 2017
Residence Tskhinvali
Term length 5 years, renewable once
Inaugural holder Lyudvig Chibirov
Formation27 November 1996

The President of the Republic of South Ossetia is the de facto head of state of the partially recognized Republic of South Ossetia that is de jure part of Georgia. This is a list of the de facto presidents of the Republic of South Ossetia and the holders of the precursor to the office.

Contents

List of Heads of State of the de facto Republic of South Ossetia (1991–present)

Chairmen of the Supreme Council (1992–1994, Chairman of the State Nyhas)

No.ImageName
(Birth–Death)
TenurePolitical Affiliation
Took OfficeLeft Office
1 Blank.png Torez Kulumbegov
(1938–2006)
10 October 19904 May 1991 Independent
2 Gassiev 2009.jpg Znaur Gassiev
(1925–2016)
4 May 19919 September 1992 Independent
3 Blank.png Torez Kulumbegov
(1938–2006)
9 September 199217 September 1993 Independent
4 Blank.png Lyudvig Chibirov
(1932–)
17 September 199327 November 1996 Independent

Presidents

No.ImageName
(Birth–Death)
TenurePolitical Affiliation
Took OfficeLeft Office
5 Blank.png Lyudvig Chibirov
(1932–)
27 November 199618 December 2001 Independent
6 Kokojty detail.jpg Eduard Kokoity
(1964–)
18 December 200110 December 2011 Unity Party
7 Vadim Brovtsev (cropped).JPG Vadim Brovtsev
(1969–)
President
11 December 201119 April 2012 Unity Party
8 Tibilov.JPG Leonid Tibilov
(1951–)
19 April 201221 April 2017 Independent
9 Anatoliy Bibilov EO.png Anatoly Bibilov
(1970–)
21 April 2017 United Ossetia

Latest election

CandidatePartyVotes%
Anatoliy Bibilov United Ossetia 17,73654.80
Leonid Tibilov Independent10,90933.71
Alan Gagloyev3,29110.17
Against all4291.33
Total32,365100.00
Valid votes32,36595.72
Invalid/blank votes1,4474.28
Total votes33,812100.00
Registered voters/turnout42,45979.63
Source: South Osetia

Related Research Articles

These are lists of incumbents, including heads of states or of subnational entities.

Ossetia

Ossetia is an ethnolinguistic region located on both sides of the Greater Caucasus Mountains, largely inhabited by the Ossetians. The Ossetian language is part of the Eastern Iranian branch of the family of Indo-European languages. Most countries recognize the Ossetian-speaking area south of the main Caucasus ridge as lying within the borders of Georgia, but it has come under the control of the de facto government of the Russian-backed Republic of South Ossetia. The northern portion of the region consists of the republic of North Ossetia–Alania within the Russian Federation.

South Ossetia Disputed territory in the South Caucasus

South Ossetia, officially the Republic of South Ossetia – the State of Alania, or the Tskhinvali Region, is a de facto state in the South Caucasus recognised by most countries as part of Georgia. It has an officially stated population of just over 53,000 people, who live in an area of 3,900 km2, south of the Russian Caucasus, with 30,000 living in Tskhinvali. The separatist polity, Republic of South Ossetia, is recognized as a state by Russia, Venezuela, Nicaragua, Nauru, and Syria. While Georgia lacks control over South Ossetia, the Georgian government and most members of the United Nations consider the territory part of Georgia, whose constitution designates the area as "the former autonomous district of South Ossetia", in reference to the South Ossetian Autonomous Oblast disbanded in 1990.

Administrative divisions of Georgia (country)

The subdivisions of Georgia are autonomous republics, regions, and municipalities.

Abkhaz–Georgian conflict Conflict between Georgia and the de facto independent Republic of Abkhazia

The Abkhaz–Georgian conflict involves ethnic conflict between Georgians and the Abkhaz people in Abkhazia, a de facto independent, partially recognized republic. In a broader sense, one can view the Georgian–Abkhaz conflict as part of a geopolitical conflict in the Caucasus region, intensified at the end of the 20th century with the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991.

Georgian–Ossetian conflict 1989–present ethno-political conflict over South Ossetia

The Georgian–Ossetian conflict is an ethno-political conflict over Georgia's former autonomous region of South Ossetia, which evolved in 1989 and developed into a war. Despite a declared ceasefire and numerous peace efforts, the conflict remained unresolved. In August 2008, military tensions and clashes between Georgia and South Ossetian separatists erupted into the Russo-Georgian War.

Frozen conflict Situation in which active armed conflict has been brought to an end, but no peace treaty or other political framework resolves the conflict to the satisfaction of the combatants

In international relations, a frozen conflict is a situation in which active armed conflict has been brought to an end, but no peace treaty or other political framework resolves the conflict to the satisfaction of the combatants. Therefore, legally the conflict can start again at any moment, creating an environment of insecurity and instability.

2006 South Ossetian presidential election

Presidential elections were held in South Ossetia on November 12, 2006, coinciding with the South Ossetian independence referendum. Incumbent Eduard Kokoity was seeking a second full five-year term. He was re-elected with more than 98.1%. According to the de facto authorities, the election was monitored by a team of 34 international observers from Germany, Austria, Poland, Sweden and other countries at 78 polling stations. The Ukrainian delegation was led by Nataliya Vitrenko of the Progressive Socialist Party of Ukraine. The election process was criticised by local civic society and the results were likely to be inflated.

Dmitry Ivanovich Sanakoyev is a South Ossetian and Georgian politician, a former official in the secessionist government of South Ossetia and currently Head of the Provisional Administration of South Ossetia, a rival entity established in 2007 in the Georgian-controlled territories of this separatist region.

People of South Ossetia for Peace

The People of South Ossetia for Peace movement was the opposition party and political movement in South Ossetia which was formed by the ethnic Ossetians who had been formerly members of the secessionist government in Tskhinvali and outspoken critics of de facto separatist regime in Tskhinvali, headed at that time by Eduard Kokoity.

Outline of Abkhazia Overview of and topical guide to Abkhazia

The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to Abkhazia:

Prime Minister of South Ossetia

The Prime Minister of the Republic of South Ossetia, officially known as the Chairman of the Government is the de facto head of government of the partially recognized Republic of South Ossetia that is de jure part of Georgia. This is a list of the de facto prime ministers of the Republic of South Ossetia.

International recognition of Abkhazia and South Ossetia International recognition of Abkhazia and South Ossetia

Abkhazia and South Ossetia are disputed territories in the Caucasus. The central government of Georgia considers the republics under military occupation by Russia. They are both partially recognised as independent states by Russia, Venezuela, Nicaragua, Nauru and Syria, while Vanuatu recognises only Abkhazia but not South Ossetia. Russia's initial recognition of the independence of Abkhazia and South Ossetia occurred in the aftermath of the Russo-Georgian War in 2008.

Armed Forces of South Ossetia

The Armed Forces of South Ossetia is the military of the partially recognised state of South Ossetia. The force consists of 16,000 soldiers: 2500 officers and active-duty soldiers and 13,500 reservists. It includes an Army and an Air Corps.

2009 South Ossetian parliamentary election

Parliamentary elections were held in South Ossetia on 31 May 2009. The result was a victory for the ruling Unity Party, which won seventeen of the 34 seats. Two opposition parties were not permitted to run out of concern that they might not be loyal to President Eduard Kokoity.

Government of South Ossetia

The Government of the Republic of South Ossetia is the political leadership of the only partially recognized, but de facto independent, Republic of South Ossetia.

Parliament of South Ossetia

The Parliament of South Ossetia is the unicameral legislature of the partially recognized Republic of South Ossetia. Members are elected using a system of Party-list proportional representation. South Ossetia has a multi-party system, and currently 4 political parties are represented in parliament. The parliament is headed by a speaker, who is elected from among the members. The current speaker is Pyotr Gassiev, member of parliament for United Ossetia.

Anatoly Bibilov

Anatoly Ilyich Bibilov is a Russian and South Ossetian military officer, currently serving as the 4th President of South Ossetia, a partially recognized, but de facto independent state, succeeding Leonid Tibilov as President on April 21, 2017, following his election victory.

Occupied territories of Georgia

Occupied territories of Georgia are the territories occupied by Russia after the Russo-Georgian War in 2008. They consist of the regions of Abkhazia and the former South Ossetian Autonomous Oblast of Soviet Georgia, whose status is a matter of international dispute.

South Ossetia is an autonomous region in Georgia, approximately 1,000 metres (3,300 ft) above sea level on the slopes of the Greater Caucasus. Although it declared independence in 2008, only a few countries acknowledge it. The region is inhabited by Ossetians, an Iranian ethnic group. According to Russia, Nicaragua, Venezuela and the microstates of Tuvalu and Nauru, it is one of the world's newest independent states. All other states and international organisations consider South Ossetia an autonomous region of Georgia, functioning as a de facto state for twenty years after declaring independence and conducting a successful armed rebellion. Its Georgian inhabitants have been displaced. South Ossetia has been a source of tension for a number of years, with Georgia and Russia's political differences impeding peaceful independence and breeding a turbulent series of events which undermine the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.