President of Uruguay

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President of the
Oriental Republic of Uruguay
Presidente de la República Oriental del Uruguay
Presidential Standard of Uruguay (On Land).svg
Presidential Standard of Uruguay
Visita Oficial del Presidente de Uruguay 2 (cropped).jpg
Incumbent
Tabaré Vázquez

since 1 March 2015
Residence Residencia de Suarez
Appointer Popular Vote Election
Term length Five years, not renewable immediately
Inaugural holder Fructuoso Rivera
Formation6 November 1830
Deputy Vice President of Uruguay
Salary11,634 USD per month [1]
Website presidencia.gub.uy
Coat of arms of Uruguay.svg
This article is part of a series on the
politics and government of
Uruguay
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The president of Uruguay (Spanish : Presidente del Uruguay), officially known as the president of the Oriental Republic of Uruguay (Spanish : Presidente de la República Oriental del Uruguay), is the head of state and head of government of Uruguay. His rights are determined in the Constitution of Uruguay. Conforms with the Secretariat of the Presidency, the Council of Ministers and the director of the Office of Planning and Budget, the executive branch. In case of absence, his office is exercised by the vice president. In turn, the president of the republic is the commander in chief of the armed forces.

Contents

According to the current Constitution Constitution of Uruguay of 1967 or Constitution of Uruguay of 1997, [2] the president is elected by direct popular vote for a term of five years. He may be reelected any number of times, but is ineligible for immediate reelection. The president and vice president run on a single ticket submitted by their party. In case no candidate obtains an absolute majority of votes (50%+1), a runoff is held between the top two candidates. In this case, the candidate who obtains a plurality in the runoff wins the election.

According to Article 168 of the Constitution, the president, acting with the respective minister or ministers, or the Council of Ministers, includes, is assigned:

  1. The preservation of order and tranquility within and security without.
  2. The command of all armed forces.
  3. The promulgation of all laws, issuing special regulations necessary for its implementation.
  4. The delivery, to the General Assembly of Uruguay at the opening of regular sessions, the state of the Republic address.
  5. The right to veto laws he dislikes.
  6. The right to propose bills or amendments to laws previously enacted.
  7. The dismissal of public employees for misfeasance, malfeasance or nonfeasance.
  8. Management of diplomatic relations and, with consent of the legislature, the right to declare war.
  9. The right to declare a state of emergency when needed.
  10. The preparation of the state budget.
  11. Negotiation of treaties with the ratification of the legislature.

Since 1990, the president's term has begun and ended on March 1. This same date for ending the presidency also happened during the National Council of Government (1952–1967) and it has been not unusual since 1839. The current president is Tabaré Vázquez.

Latest election

e    d  Summary of the 26 October 2014 General Assembly of Uruguay election
and the 30 November 2014 presidential election run-off.
Party or coalition
Presidential candidate
First round (General election)Second round
(Presidential runoff)
Votes%Seats
Chamber+/–Senate+/–Votes%
Broad Front
Tabaré Vázquez
1,134,18749.4550015–11,226,10556.63
National Party
Luis Alberto Lacalle Pou
732,60131.9432+210+1939,07443.37
Colorado Party
Pedro Bordaberry
305,69913.3313–44–1
Independent Party
Pablo Mieres
73,3793.203+11+1
Popular Unity
Gonzalo Abella
26,8691.171+100
Partido Ecologista Radical Intransigente
César Vega
17,8350.780N/A0N/A
Workers' Party
Rafael Fernández
3,2180.140N/A0N/A
Total2,372,1171009903002,321,230100
Invalid/blank votes78,329156,051
Registered voters/turnout2,620,79190.512,620,79188.57
Source: Corte Electoral, Buenos Aires Herald

Living former presidents

See also

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References

  1. "Shocking Gap Between Latin America's Presidential Salaries And Workers Minimum Wage". Latin Post.
  2. https://web.archive.org/web/20150329211901/http://www.parlamento.gub.uy/constituciones/const004.html