Prevalje

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Prevalje

Občina Prevalje
Town and Municipality
Karte Prevalje si.png
Location of the Municipality of Prevalje in Slovenia
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Red pog.svg
Prevalje
Location of the Town of Prevalje in Slovenia
Coordinates: 46°32′48″N14°58′48″E / 46.54667°N 14.98000°E / 46.54667; 14.98000 Coordinates: 46°32′48″N14°58′48″E / 46.54667°N 14.98000°E / 46.54667; 14.98000
Country Flag of Slovenia.svg  Slovenia
Area
  Total58.1 km2 (22.4 sq mi)
Population
(2002) [1]
  Total6,643
  Density110/km2 (300/sq mi)
Time zone UTC+01 (CET)
  Summer (DST) UTC+02 (CEST)

Prevalje (pronounced  [ˈpɾeːʋaljɛ] ( Loudspeaker.svg listen ); German: Prävali) is a settlement and a municipality in northern Slovenia. It lies in the traditional Slovenian province of Carinthia. On 1 January 1999 Prevalje became an independent municipality. [2] Prevalje lies in a valley where the Meža River emerges from a narrow gorge, full of fluvioglacial sediments. To the north the settlement is limited by the Strojna, Stražišče, and Dolga Brda hills. To the south are Navrski vrh (605 m) and Riflov vrh (726 m).

German language West Germanic language

German is a West Germanic language that is mainly spoken in Central Europe. It is the most widely spoken and official or co-official language in Germany, Austria, Switzerland, South Tyrol (Italy), the German-speaking Community of Belgium, and Liechtenstein. It is also one of the three official languages of Luxembourg and a co-official language in the Opole Voivodeship in Poland. The languages which are most similar to German are the other members of the West Germanic language branch: Afrikaans, Dutch, English, the Frisian languages, Low German/Low Saxon, Luxembourgish, and Yiddish. There are also strong similarities in vocabulary with Danish, Norwegian and Swedish, although those belong to the North Germanic group. German is the second most widely spoken Germanic language, after English.

Municipality An administrative division having corporate status and usually some powers of self-government or jurisdiction

A municipality is usually a single administrative division having corporate status and powers of self-government or jurisdiction as granted by national and regional laws to which it is subordinate. It is to be distinguished (usually) from the county, which may encompass rural territory or numerous small communities such as towns, villages and hamlets.

Slovenia republic in Central Europe

Slovenia, officially the Republic of Slovenia, is a sovereign state located in southern Central Europe at a crossroads of important European cultural and trade routes. It is bordered by Italy to the west, Austria to the north, Hungary to the northeast, Croatia to the southeast, and the Adriatic Sea to the southwest. It covers 20,273 square kilometers (7,827 sq mi) and has a population of 2.07 million. One of the successor states of the former Yugoslavia, Slovenia is a parliamentary republic and a member of the United Nations, of the European Union, and of NATO. The capital and largest city is Ljubljana.

Contents

History

The area around Prevalje was settled in prehistoric times, attested by archeological finds which include a bronze axe of the Hallstatt culture. In 1860, approximately 50 Roman marble slabs were found in the riverbed below today's cellulose and cardboard factory at Paloma in Zagrad. The stones belonged to a large tomb on the Roman road from Celeia to Virunum. At the nearby Brančurnik pub, a Roman sarcophagus known as the Brančurnik Bench (Slovene : Brančurnikova klop) can be seen.

Hallstatt culture Archaeological culture

The Hallstatt culture was the predominant Western and Central European culture of Late Bronze Age from the 12th to 8th centuries BC and Early Iron Age Europe from the 8th to 6th centuries BC, developing out of the Urnfield culture of the 12th century BC and followed in much of its area by the La Tène culture. It is commonly associated with Proto-Celtic and Celtic populations in the Western Hallstatt zone and with (pre-)Illyrians in the eastern Hallstatt zone.

Roman roads roads built in service of the Roman Empire

Roman roads were physical infrastructure vital to the maintenance and development of the Roman state, and were built from about 300 BC through the expansion and consolidation of the Roman Republic and the Roman Empire. They provided efficient means for the overland movement of armies, officials, and civilians, and the inland carriage of official communications and trade goods. Roman roads were of several kinds, ranging from small local roads to broad, long-distance highways built to connect cities, major towns and military bases. These major roads were often stone-paved and metaled, cambered for drainage, and were flanked by footpaths, bridleways and drainage ditches. They were laid along accurately surveyed courses, and some were cut through hills, or conducted over rivers and ravines on bridgework. Sections could be supported over marshy ground on rafted or piled foundations.

Celje Place in Slovenia

Celje is the third-largest town in Slovenia. It is a regional center of the traditional Slovenian region of Styria and the administrative seat of the City Municipality of Celje. The town of Celje is located below Upper Celje Castle at the confluence of the Savinja, Hudinja, Ložnica, and Voglajna rivers in the lower Savinja Valley, and at the crossing of the roads connecting Ljubljana, Maribor, Velenje, and the Central Sava Valley. It lies 238 m (781 ft) above mean sea level (MSL).

One of the last battles of the Second World War in Europe, the Battle of Poljana, was fought nearby on 14 and 15 May 1945 between the Yugoslav army and retreating Axis forces.[ citation needed ] In 2010, Slovenian officials discovered a mass grave containing the remains of approximately 700 men and women killed by units of KNOJ in 1945. [3]

The Battle of Poljana was a battle of World War II in Yugoslavia. It started at Poljana, near the village of Prevalje in Yugoslavia, and was the culmination of a series of engagements between the Yugoslav Partisans and a large retreating Axis column, numbering in excess of 30,000 men. The column consisted of units of the German (Wehrmacht), the Armed Forces of the Independent State of Croatia, the Montenegrin People's Army, and Slovene Home Guard forces, as well as other fascist collaborationist factions and even civilians who were attempting to escape into British-controlled Austria. It took place after Nazi Germany officially surrendered on 8 May.

Geography

The historical center of Prevalje is on the left bank of the Meža, on the north edge of the valley, in the hamlet of Na Fari around the parish church dedicated to the Assumption of Mary, known locally as Mary on the Lake (Slovene : Marija na jezeru). It was originally a late Romanesque building, first mentioned in written documents dating to 1335, but the current church dates to 1890. [4] A second historical centre lies around the confluence of Leše Creek (Slovene : Leški potok) with the Meža. This is where the first industrial companies were established at the beginning of the 18th century, laying the foundations for rapid economic development of the area.

Parish church church which acts as the religious centre of a parish

A parish church in Christianity is the church which acts as the religious centre of a parish. In many parts of the world, especially in rural areas, the parish church may play a significant role in community activities, often allowing its premises to be used for non-religious community events. The church building reflects this status, and there is considerable variety in the size and style of parish churches. Many villages in Europe have churches that date back to the Middle Ages, but all periods of architecture are represented.

Assumption of Mary the bodily taking up of the Virgin Mary into Heaven at the end of her earthly life

The Assumption of Mary into Heaven is, according to the beliefs of the Catholic Church, Eastern and Oriental Orthodoxy, the bodily taking up of the Virgin Mary into Heaven at the end of her earthly life.

Slovene language language spoken in Slovenia

Slovene or Slovenian belongs to the group of South Slavic languages. It is spoken by approximately 2.5 million speakers worldwide, the majority of whom live in Slovenia. It is the first language of about 2.1 million Slovenian people and is one of the 24 official and working languages of the European Union.

Economy

Prevalje was an important ironworking centre. The development of the town was closely connected the iron industry. Even today the processing industry forms an important basis for the economy of Prevalje, followed by trade, metal processing, traffic and building industry. In recent years services and tourism have also increased.

Ironworks building or site where iron is smelted

An ironworks or iron works is a building or site where iron is smelted and where heavy iron and steel products are made. The term is both singular and plural, i.e. the singular of ironworks is ironworks.

The biggest companies in the municipality as of 2003 include: Lesna (furniture industry), Koratur (coach and bus companies), Prevent (textile industry), Lek (Pharmaceuticals), Jamnica (trade), Paloma (paper industry) and Instalater (engineering, services). There are also several elementary schools, a nursery school, preschools, a medical clinic, a bank, and a post office in the town.

Sports

Stadion na Prevaljah, also known as Stadion Ugasle peči, is a multi-purpose stadium in Prevalje. It is used mostly for football matches and is the home ground of DNŠ Prevalje. [5] The stadium was built in 1942 and is currently able to hold 1,800 spectators, 600 of them can be seated. NK Korotan Prevalje, now defunct, competed in the Slovenian PrvaLiga for nine seasons.

Multi-purpose stadium type of stadium

Multi-purpose stadiums are a type of stadium designed to be easily used by multiple types of events. While any stadium could potentially host more than one type of sport or event, this concept usually refers to a specific design philosophy that stresses multifunctionality over specificity. It is used most commonly in Canada and the United States, where the two most popular outdoor team sports – football and baseball – require radically different facilities. Football uses a rectangular field, while baseball is played on a diamond and large outfield. This requires a particular design to accommodate both, usually an oval. While building stadiums in this way means that sports teams and governments can share costs, it also imposes some challenges.

Association football Team field sport

Association football, more commonly known as football or soccer, is a team sport played with a spherical ball between two teams of eleven players. It is played by 250 million players in over 200 countries and dependencies, making it the world's most popular sport. The game is played on a rectangular field called a pitch with a goal at each end. The object of the game is to score by moving the ball beyond the goal line into the opposing goal.

DNŠ Prevalje

Društvo nogometna šola Prevalje, commonly referred to as DNŠ Prevalje or simply Prevalje, is a Slovenian football club, which plays in the town of Prevalje. They are currently playing in the Slovenian Third League under the name Korotan Prevalje. The club was established in 2002 after the dissolvement of NK Korotan Prevalje, a club which folded during the first part of the 2002–03 Slovenian PrvaLiga season, due to a high financial debt. Legally, the two clubs' track records and honours are kept separate by the Football Association of Slovenia.

Notable natives and residents

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