Prince Albert Mountains

Last updated

The Prince Albert Mountains ( 76°00′S161°30′E / 76.000°S 161.500°E / -76.000; 161.500 ) are a major mountain group in Antarctica over 320 km (200 mi) long. Located in Victoria Land, they run north–south between the Priestley and Ferrar glaciers. [1]

Contents

They were named for Prince Albert, the consort of the British Queen Victoria. Although they were discovered by Sir James Clark Ross on February 17, 1841, they were not first explored until the early 1900s, when British cartographers came. They were mapped and surveyed carefully by explorers from the United States and New Zealand in the 1950s and 1960s. [1]

Major peaks

Mount Joyce Joyce2.jpg
Mount Joyce

This range include the following mountains:

Mountainmetresfeet
Mount Mackintosh 2,4688,087
Mount Joyce 1,8306,000
Mount Billing 1,4204,700
Mount Mallis 1,3604,462
Mount Priestley 1,1003,600

Other features

Other features or groups of features in the Prince Albert Mountains have been named by various survey groups and expeditions.

Sheppard Rocks ( 75°37′S158°38′E / 75.617°S 158.633°E / -75.617; 158.633 ) is a group of rocks first mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1956–62. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Paul D. Sheppard, storekeeper with the South Pole Station winter party in 1966. They lie 4 miles (6 km) northwest of Ricker Hills. [2]

Ricker Hills ( 75°41′S159°10′E / 75.683°S 159.167°E / -75.683; 159.167 ) is a group of mainly ice-free hills, about 9 nautical miles (17 km) long, lying just west of Hollingsworth Glacier and 4 nautical miles (7 km) north of Bobby Rocks. They were mapped and named by the Southern Party of the New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition (NZGSAE), 1962–63, for J.F. Ricker, a geologist with the party. [3]

The Bobby Rocks ( 75°49′S159°11′E / 75.817°S 159.183°E / -75.817; 159.183 ) are a group of ice-free rocks lying 4 nautical miles (7 km) south of the Ricker Hills. Like the Sheppard Rocks, they were mapped by the USGS from surveys and air photos, 1956–62. They were named by US-ACAN for Bobby J. Davis, a commissaryman with the South Pole Station winter party, 1966. [4]

See also

Related Research Articles

Queen Elizabeth Range (Antarctica)

The Queen Elizabeth Range is a rugged mountain range of the Transantarctic Mountains System, located in the Ross Dependency region of Antarctica.

Usarp Mountains

The Usarp Mountains are a major Antarctic mountain range, lying west of the Rennick Glacier and trending north to south for about 190 kilometres (118 mi). The feature is bounded to the north by Pryor Glacier and the Wilson Hills.

Hut Point Peninsula

Hut Point Peninsula is a long, narrow peninsula from 3 to 5 km wide and 24 km (15 mi) long, projecting south-west from the slopes of Mount Erebus on Ross Island, Antarctica. McMurdo Station (US) and Scott Base (NZ) are Antarctic research stations located on the Hut Point Peninsula.

Wilson Hills is a group of scattered hills, nunataks and ridges that extend NW-SE for about 110 kilometres (68 mi) between Matusevich Glacier and Pryor Glacier in Antarctica. They were discovered by Lieutenant Harry Pennell, Royal Navy, on the Terra Nova Expedition in February 1911 during Robert Falcon Scott's last expedition, and named after Dr. Edward A. Wilson, a zoologist with the expedition, who perished with Scott on the return journey from the South Pole.

Shomo Rock is a nunatak lying between the Ricker Hills and Pape Rock in the Prince Albert Mountains, Oates Land. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos 1956–62. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Barry C. Shomo, equipment operator with the South Pole Station winter party of 1966.

The McCuddin Mountains is a small cluster of mountains in Antarctica consisting mainly of two large mountains, Mount Flint and Mount Petras, along with several scattered peaks and nunataks. Located in Marie Byrd Land, 64 km (40 mi) east of the Ames Range. The mountains were discovered and photographed from the air in a flight from West Base of the U.S. Antarctic Service on Dec. 14, 1940. They were mapped by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1959-65. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Rear Admiral Leo B. McCuddin, U.S. Navy (USN), Commander of the U.S. Naval Support Force, Antarctica, 1972.

Ambalada Peak is a rock peak, 2,160 metres (7,090 ft) high, standing 2 nautical miles (4 km) southeast of Griffin Nunatak in the Prince Albert Mountains of Victoria Land, Antarctica. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1956–62, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Cesar N. Ambalada, an electrician with the South Pole Station winter party, 1966.

Mount Stierer is a mountain (1,080 m) rising 1.5 nautical miles (2.8 km) north-northeast of Mount Bellingshausen in the Prince Albert Mountains, Victoria Land. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1957–62. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) after Byron A. Stierer, Airman First Class, United States Air Force (USAF), a member of the McMurdo Station wintering party, 1962.

Freyberg Mountains

The Freyberg Mountains are a group of mountains in Victoria Land, Antarctica, bounded by Rennick Glacier, Bowers Mountains, Black Glacier, and Evans Neve. Named for New Zealand's most famous General, Lord Bernard Freyberg, by the Northern Party of New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition (NZGSAE), 1963-64. This mountain group includes the Alamein Range. These topographical features all lie situated on the Pennell Coast, a portion of Antarctica lying between Cape Williams and Cape Adare.

Griffin Nunatak is a flat-topped nunatak about 2 nautical miles (4 km) long, standing between Ambalada Peak and Terminal Peak in the Prince Albert Mountains of Oates Land, Antarctica. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1956–62, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Lieutenant William R. Griffin, U.S. Navy, officer in charge at South Pole Station, winter party 1966.

Pape Rock is a lone rock at the south side of David Glacier, 3 nautical miles (6 km) northwest of Shomo Rock, in the Prince Albert Mountains, Oates Land. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1956–62. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Bernard C. Pape, builder with the South Pole Station winter party, 1966.

Mount Fearon is a mountain, 1,140 metres (3,740 ft) high, rising at the east side of Woodberry Glacier, 6 nautical miles (11 km) northwest of Mount Priestley, in the Prince Albert Mountains of Victoria Land, Antarctica. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1956–62, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Colin E. Fearon, a biologist at McMurdo Station, summer 1962–63.

Long Glacier

Long Glacier is a glacier about 8 nautical miles long in the southeastern part of Thurston Island, Antarctica. It flows south to the Abbot Ice Shelf, 14 nautical miles (26 km) west of Harrison Nunatak. The glacier was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1960–66, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Fred A. Long, Jr., an aviation machinist of U.S. Navy Squadron VX-6, who wintered at Little America V in 1957 and was in Antarctica in the 1960–61 and 1962–63 seasons.

Sawyer Nunatak is a small but distinctive nunatak standing 3 nautical miles (6 km) southeast of Mount Stephens in the Prince Albert Mountains, Victoria Land. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1956–62. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Joseph O. Sawyer, satellite geodesist with the McMurdo Station winter party, 1966.

Mount Send is a mountain (1,180 m) on the north flank of Pryor Glacier, 10 nautical miles (18 km) east of Basilica Peak, in southern Wilson Hills. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1960–62. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Raymond F. Send, United States Antarctic Research Program (USARP) geophysicist at McMurdo Station, 1967–68.

Tent Rock is a small nunatak shaped like a ridge tent, lying 1 nautical mile (1.9 km) southwest of Thomas Rock and 7 nautical miles (13 km) west of Ricker Hills in the Prince Albert Mountains, Oates Land. Mapped and descriptively named by the Southern Party of New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition (NZGSAE) (1962–63).

Thomas Rock is a small nunatak lying 1 nautical mile (1.9 km) northeast of Tent Rock and 6 nautical miles (11 km) west of Ricker Hills in the Prince Albert Mountains, Victoria Land. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos 1956–62. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Kenneth E. Thomas, radioman with the winter party at South Pole Station, 1966.

Rathbone Hills is a line of low hills or nunataks, 14 nautical miles (26 km) long and trending east-west, located 4 nautical miles (7 km) north of Guthridge Nunataks in the Gutenko Mountains of central Palmer Land. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) in 1974. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Maj. David L. Rathbone, United States Marine Corps (USMC), Commander of LC-130 aircraft in U.S. Navy Squadron VXE-6 during Operation Deep Freeze, 1970 and 1971.

Renirie Rocks is an elliptical rock outcrop 1.5 nautical miles (2.8 km) long at the west side of the terminus of Gressitt Glacier, 10 nautical miles (18 km) northwest of Morozumi Range. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1960–63. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Jack Renirie, United States Antarctic Research Program (USARP) Public Information Officer at McMurdo Station in at least five austral summer seasons, 1962-63 through 1970–71.

References

  1. 1 2 "Prince Albert Mountains". Geographic Names Information System . United States Geological Survey . Retrieved 2005-03-22.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  2. "Sheppard Rocks". Geographic Names Information System . United States Geological Survey . Retrieved 2018-08-13.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  3. "Ricker Hills". Geographic Names Information System . United States Geological Survey . Retrieved 2018-08-13.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  4. "Bobby Rocks". Geographic Names Information System . United States Geological Survey . Retrieved 2018-08-13.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)