Prince Charles Mountains

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Prince Charles Mountains
Antarctica relief location map.jpg
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Prince Charles Mountains
Highest point
Peak Mount Menzies
Elevation 3,228 m (10,591 ft)
Jetty Peninsula Satellite Image Map.jpg

The Prince Charles Mountains are a major group of mountains in Mac. Robertson Land in Antarctica, including the Athos Range, the Porthos Range, and the Aramis Range. The highest peak is Mount Menzies, with a height of 3,228 m (10,591 ft). Other prominent peaks are Mount Izabelle and Mount Stinear (1,950 m; 6,400 ft). These mountains, together with other scattered peaks, form an arc about 420 km (260 mi) long, extending from the vicinity of Mount Starlight in the north to Goodspeed Nunataks in the south. [1]

Contents

These mountains were first observed and photographed from a distance by airmen of USN Operation Highjump, 1946–47. They were examined by several ANARE (Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions) parties and mapped in the years 1954–61. [1] They have been found to contain large deposits of iron ore. [2] They were named by ANCA in 1956 for King Charles III, then Prince Charles and heir to the throne, son of the late Queen Elizabeth II.

List of key mountains

Ranges

Aramis Range

Athos Range

Porthos Range

Other features

Ridges

Nunataks

Mountains

Massifs

Other Features

Notes

  1. 1 2 3 "Prince Charles Mountains". Geographic Names Information System . United States Geological Survey, United States Department of the Interior . Retrieved 2005-09-28.
  2. Antarctica: An Encyclopedia from Abbot Ice Shelf to Zooplankton, Firefly, 2002. ISBN   1-55297-590-8.
  3. "Mount Bayliss". Geographic Names Information System . United States Geological Survey, United States Department of the Interior . Retrieved 2010-09-23.
  4. "Mount Gibson". Geographic Names Information System . United States Geological Survey, United States Department of the Interior . Retrieved 2009-02-18.
  5. "Mount Izabelle". Geographic Names Information System . United States Geological Survey, United States Department of the Interior . Retrieved 2008-03-20.
  6. "Mount Meredith". Geographic Names Information System . United States Geological Survey, United States Department of the Interior . Retrieved 2013-09-19.
  7. "Mount Rymill". Geographic Names Information System . United States Geological Survey, United States Department of the Interior . Retrieved 2010-10-17.
  8. "Schmitter Peak". Geographic Names Information System . United States Geological Survey, United States Department of the Interior . Retrieved 2010-10-17.
  9. "Shaw Massif". Geographic Names Information System . United States Geological Survey, United States Department of the Interior . Retrieved 2008-01-02.
  10. "Simon Ridge". Geographic Names Information System . United States Geological Survey, United States Department of the Interior . Retrieved 2008-03-16.
  11. "Mount Stinear". Geographic Names Information System . United States Geological Survey, United States Department of the Interior . Retrieved 2005-09-28.
  12. Matt McGrath (2013-12-17). "New findings hint at diamond deposits in Antarctica". BBC. Retrieved 2013-12-17.
  13. "Thomas, Mount". Geographic Names Information System . United States Geological Survey, United States Department of the Interior . Retrieved 2014-05-29.
  14. "Cumpston Massif". Geographic Names Information System . United States Geological Survey, United States Department of the Interior . Retrieved 10 December 2011.
  15. "Nilsson Rocks on Australian Antarctic Data Centre".

72°0′S67°0′E / 72.000°S 67.000°E / -72.000; 67.000

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from websites or documents ofthe United States Geological Survey .

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