Prince Tsunehisa Takeda

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Prince Tsunehisa Takeda
HIH Prince Takeda Tsunehisa.jpg
Prince Takeda Tsunehisa
BornSeptember 28, 1882
Kyoto, Japan
DiedApril 23, 1919(1919-04-23) (aged 36)
Tokyo, Japan
Allegiance Empire of Japan
Service/branch War flag of the Imperial Japanese Army.svg Imperial Japanese Army
Years of service1903–1919
Rank Major General
Battles/wars Russo-Japanese War
Spouse(s)

Prince Tsunehisa Takeda(竹田宮恒久王,Takeda-no-miya Tsunehisa-ō, September 22, 1882 – April 23, 1919) was the founder of the Takeda-no-miya collateral branch of the Japanese Imperial Family.

Takeda-no-miya

The Takeda (竹田) ōke was the tenth and youngest branch of the Japanese Imperial Family created from branches of the Fushimi-no-miya house.

The Kyū-Miyake, also known as the Old Imperial Family (旧皇族), were branches of the Japanese Imperial Family created from branches of the Fushimi-no-miya house. All but one of the ōke were formed by the descendants of Prince Fushimi Kuniye. The ōke were stripped of their membership in the Imperial Family by the American Occupation Authorities in October 1947, as part of the abolition of collateral imperial houses. After that point, only the immediate family of Hirohito and those of his three brothers retained membership in the Imperial Family. However, unofficial heads of these collateral families still exist for most and are listed herein.

Contents

Biography

Prince Tsunehisa Takeda was the eldest son of Prince Kitashirakawa Yoshihisa and thus the brother of Prince Kitashirakawa Naruhisa. In 1902, he served in the House of Peers, and on November 30, 1903 graduated from the 15th class of the Imperial Japanese Army Academy.

Prince Kitashirakawa Yoshihisa Japanese prince

Prince Kitashirakawa Yoshihisa of Japan, was the second head of a collateral branch of the Japanese imperial family. He was formerly enshrined in Tainan-Jinja, Taiwan, under the name Kitashirakawa no Miya Yoshihisa-shinnō no Mikoto as the main and only deity.

Imperial Japanese Army Academy military academy

The Imperial Japanese Army Academy was the principal officer's training school for the Imperial Japanese Army. The programme consisted of a junior course for graduates of local army cadet schools and for those who had completed four years of middle school, and a senior course for officer candidates.

In 1904, he was appointed as a major general in the Imperial Japanese Army. He served with distinction in the Russo-Japanese War of 1904–1905 in the Imperial Guards Division and was awarded the Order of the Golden Kite (5th class) for bravery in combat. On his return to Japan after the Russo-Japanese War, Emperor Meiji authorized Prince Tsunehisa to start a new princely house in March 1906, largely to provide a household with suitable status for his sixth daughter Masako, Princess Tsune. Prince Takeda married Princess Masako on the April 30, 1908, by whom he had a son and a daughter:

Major general is a military rank used in many countries. It is derived from the older rank of sergeant major general. The disappearance of the "sergeant" in the title explains the apparently confusing phenomenon whereby a lieutenant general outranks a major general while a major outranks a lieutenant.

Russo-Japanese War war between the Russian Empire and the Empire of Japan

The Russo-Japanese War was fought during 1904-1905 between the Russian Empire and the Empire of Japan over rival imperial ambitions in Manchuria and Korea. The major theatres of operations were the Liaodong Peninsula and Mukden in Southern Manchuria and the seas around Korea, Japan and the Yellow Sea.

Order of the Golden Kite

The Order of the Golden Kite was an order of the Empire of Japan, established on 12 February 1890 by Emperor Meiji "in commemoration of Jimmu Tennō, the Romulus of Japan". It was officially abolished by the Supreme Commander of the Allied Powers of Occupied Japan in 1947 after World War II.

  1. Prince Tsuneyoshi Takeda (竹田宮恒徳王,Takeda-no-miya Tsuneyoshi ō) (1909–1992) [1]
  2. Princess Ayako Takeda (禮子女王,Ayako Joō), (1913–2003), married Count Sano Tsunemitsu.

Prince Takeda graduated from the 22nd class of the Army War College in 1910. In 1913 he was awarded the Grand Cordon of the Supreme Order of the Chrysanthemum. Prince Takeda Tsunehisa died during the worldwide epidemic of the Spanish influenza in Tokyo in 1919.

Army War College (Japan) staff college of the Imperial Japanese Army

The Army War College; Short form: Rikudai (陸大) of the Empire of Japan was founded in 1882 in Minato, Tokyo to modernize and Westernize the Imperial Japanese Army. Much of the empire's elite including prime ministers during the period of Japanese militarism were graduates of the college.

Order of the Chrysanthemum award

The Supreme Order of the Chrysanthemum is Japan's highest order. The Grand Cordon of the Order was established in 1876 by Emperor Meiji of Japan; the collar of the Order was added on 4 January 1888. Although technically the order has only one class, it can either be awarded "with collar", meaning on a chain, or "with grand cordon", accompanied by a sash. Unlike its European counterparts, the order may be conferred posthumously.

Epidemic rapid spread of infectious disease to a large number of people in a given population within a short period of time

An epidemic is the rapid spread of infectious disease to a large number of people in a given population within a short period of time, usually two weeks or less. For example, in meningococcal infections, an attack rate in excess of 15 cases per 100,000 people for two consecutive weeks is considered an epidemic.

Ancestry

[2]

Notes

  1. Nihon Gaiji Kyōkai. (1943). The Japan Year book, p. 5.
  2. "Genealogy". Reichsarchiv. Retrieved 7 September 2017.(in Japanese)

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References

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