Prince Tsunesada

Last updated
Tsunesada
Crown Prince of Japan
Tsunesada Shinno.jpg
Illustration by Kikuchi Yōsai, from Zenken Kojitsu
Born825
DiedOctober 12, 884(884-10-12) (aged 58–59)
Father Emperor Junna
Mother Princess Seishi

Prince Tsunesada (恒貞親王, Tsunesada-shinnō, 825 – October 12, 884) was a Japanese prince of the early Heian period. He was the second son of Emperor Junna. He was also known as Prince Teishi (亭子親王), and by his Buddhist name of Gōjyaku (恒寂). He was Crown Prince (皇太子, Kōtaishi) from 833 to 842, during the reign of his cousin Emperor Ninmyō.

Contents

Life

After the death of his older half-brother Prince Tsuneyo (恒世親王), Tsunesada became Emperor Junna's successor. In 833, his cousin Emperor Ninmyō took the throne, and by the wishes of the retired emperor Saga, Tsunesada became Crown Prince. In 838, Tsunesada underwent the genbuku rite of passage in the shishin-den (紫宸殿) palace, at which he is said to have shown good manners, and cut a graceful figure as he expressed his gratitude to the Emperor. After this, Tsunesada and the retired Emperor Junna became anxious about being embroiled in a power struggle and repeatedly petitioned to resign, but Saga and Ninmyō dissuaded them each time. [1] However, after the Jōwa Incident immediately following Saga's death in 842, Tsunesada was disinherited as crown prince.

In 849, he was conferred the third rank (三品) as a prince, but he soon became a monk, taking on the Buddhist name of Gōjyaku. He was administered the kanjō rite of esoteric Buddhism by Prince Takaoka, now also a monk, and became the first abbot of Daikaku-ji. When another succession dispute broke out in 884 after the abdication of Emperor Yōzei, Tsunesada was asked to take the throne, but he declined. In his last moments he is said to have announced that his time had come, purified his clothes, offered incense and flowers to the Buddha, and assumed the Lotus position and facing West before dying.

Personality

According to the Nihon Sandai Jitsuroku , Tsunesada possessed an easy and elegant personality and a beautiful appearance. [2] Tsunesada was also known for his elegant calligraphy. [3]

Genealogy

Notes

  1. According to Tsunesada Shinnō-den (恒貞親王伝), a 9th-century account of his life.
  2. "Gangyō Year 8, Month 9, Day 20". Nihon Sandai Jitsuroku .
  3. Sansom, George (1958). A History of Japan to 1334 . Stanford University Press. p.  127. ISBN   978-0804705233.

Related Research Articles

Emperor Kanmu Emperor of Japan

Emperor Kammu, or Kanmu, was the 50th emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. Kammu reigned from 781 to 806, and it was during his reign that Japanese imperial power reached its peak.

Emperor Saga Emperor of Japan

Emperor Saga was the 52nd emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. Saga's reign spanned the years from 809 through 823.

Emperor Junna Emperor of Japan

Emperor Junna was the 53rd emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. Junna reigned from 823 to 833.

Emperor Ninmyō Emperor of Japan

Emperor Ninmyō was the 54th emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. Ninmyō's reign lasted from 833 to 850, during the Heian period.

Emperor Montoku Emperor of Japan

Emperor Montoku was the 55th emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession.

Emperor Seiwa Emperor of Japan

Emperor Seiwa was the 56th emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession.

Emperor Yōzei Emperor of Japan

Emperor Yōzei was the 57th emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession.

Emperor Kōkō Former Emperor of Japan

Emperor Kōkō was the 58th emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession.

Emperor Go-Saga Emperor of Japan

Emperor Go-Saga was the 88th emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. This reign spanned the years 1242 through 1246.

Emperor Go-Fukakusa Japanese emperor (1243–1304)

Emperor Go-Fukakusa was the 89th emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. This reign spanned the years 1246 through 1260.

Emperor Sanjō Emperor of Japan

Emperor Sanjō was the 67th emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession.

Emperor Reizei was the 63rd emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession.

Emperor Kameyama Emperor of Japan

Emperor Kameyama was the 90th emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession. His reign spanned the years from 1260 through 1274.

Rikkokushi (六国史) is a general term for Japan's Six National Histories chronicling the mythology and history of Japan from the earliest times to 887. The six histories were written at the imperial court during the 8th and 9th centuries, under order of the Emperors. The basic sources were the court records kept by the Ministry of Central Imperial Affairs, and the biographies of meritorious officials composed in the Ministry of Ceremonial Affairs.

Fujiwara no Nagara 9th-century Japanese statesman

Fujiwara no Nagara, also known as Fujiwara no Nagayoshi, was a Japanese statesman, courtier and politician of the early Heian period. He was the grandfather of Emperor Yōzei.

Fujiwara no Fuyutsugu

Fujiwara no Fuyutsugu was a Japanese noble, statesman, general, and poet of the early Heian period. A member of the Hokke, he was the second son of the udaijin Fujiwara no Uchimaro. He attained the court rank of shō ni-i (正二位) and the position of sadaijin, and posthumously of shō ichi-i (正一位) and daijō-daijin. He was also known as Kan'in-Daijin (閑院大臣).

Sugano no Mamichi

Sugano no Mamichi, originally known as Tsu no Mamichi (津真道), was a Japanese noble of the early Heian period. He reached the court rank of ju san-mi (従三位) and the position of sangi.

Fujiwara no Yoshimi

Fujiwara no Yoshimi was a Japanese noble of the early Heian period. He was the fifth son of the sadaijin Fujiwara no Fuyutsugu of the Fujiwara Hokke and the uncle of Emperor Montoku. He reached the court rank of shō ni-i (正二位) and the position of udaijin, and was posthumously granted the rank of shō ichi-i (正一位). He was also known as Nishisanjō-Daijin (西三条大臣).

Sugawara no Koreyoshi

Sugawara no Koreyoshi was a Japanese poet and politician of the early Heian period. He was the fourth son of Sugawara no Kiyotomo. He reached the court rank of ju san-mi (従三位) and the position of sangi.

The Jōwa incident was a Japanese succession dispute that occurred in 842, during the early Heian period. Fujiwara no Yoshifusa's nephew, the future Emperor Montoku, took over the role of Crown Prince, while the former crown prince Prince Tsunesada and a number of Yoshifusa's rivals were removed from power. It brought an end to thirty years of uneventful successions that the court had enjoyed by the wishes of Emperor Kanmu and the power of Emperor Saga.

References