Principality of Ansbach

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Margraviate of Brandenburg-Ansbach / Principality of Ansbach

Markgrafschaft Brandenburg-Ansbach / Fürstentum Ansbach
1398–1791
Principality of Ansbach 1791.png
The principality of Brandenburg-Ansbach as of 1791, superimposed over modern borders
StatusPrincipality
CapitalAnsbach
Common languages East Franconian
GovernmentPrincipality
Historical era Early modern period

1219
 Partition of
burgraviate

21 January 1398

1415–40
 Reunion with
Bayreuth

11 June 1420
 Repartition
21 September 1440
 Restoration of
personal union

1470–86
 Margraviate sold
to Prussia

2 December 1791
 Formal annexation
28 January 1792
Preceded by
Succeeded by
COA family de Burggrafen von Nurnberg (Haus Hohenzollern).svg Burgraviate of Nuremberg
Kingdom of Prussia Flag of Prussia (1750).svg
Today part ofFlag of Germany.svg  Germany

The Principality or Margraviate of (Brandenburg-)Ansbach (German : Fürstentum Ansbach or Markgrafschaft Brandenburg-Ansbach) was a free imperial principality in the Holy Roman Empire centered on the Franconian city of Ansbach. The ruling Hohenzollern princes of the land were known as margraves, as the principality was a margraviate (but not a march).

Contents

History

The principality was established at the death of Frederick V, Burgrave of Nuremberg, on 21 January 1398, when his lands were partitioned between his two sons. The younger son, Frederick VI, received Ansbach and the elder, John III, received Bayreuth. After John III's death on 11 June 1420, the two principalities were reunited under Frederick VI, who had become Elector Frederick I of Brandenburg in 1415.

Upon Frederick I's death on 21 September 1440, his territories were divided between his sons; John received the principality of Bayreuth (Brandenburg-Kulmbach), Frederick received Brandenburg, and Albert received Ansbach. Thereafter Ansbach was held by cadet branches of the House of Hohenzollern, and its rulers were commonly called Margraves of Brandenburg-Ansbach.

On 2 December 1791, the reigning Prince and Margrave of Ansbach, Charles Alexander, who had also succeeded to Bayreuth, sold the sovereignty of his principalities to King Frederick William II of Prussia. The Margrave was middle-aged and childless, and Frederick William was his kinsman as the head of the House of Hohenzollern. The Margrave moved to England with his English second wife. Ansbach was formally annexed on 28 January 1792.

Princes and Margraves of Ansbach

See also

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