Province of Brabant

Last updated
Province of Brabant
Former province of Belgium
(Netherlands until 1830)
1815–1995
Flag
Province of Brabant in Belgium 1963-1995.svg
Capital Brussels
Demonym Brabantian
History 
 Established
1815
 Disestablished
1995
Preceded by
Succeeded by
Blason ville fr Bruxelles-Empire2.svg Dyle (department)
Walloon Brabant Drapeau Province BE Brabant Wallon.svg
Flemish Brabant Flag of Flemish Brabant.svg
Brussels-Capital Region Flag of the Brussels-Capital Region.svg
Map of the Low Countries including Brabant (yellow). The border between the Northern and the Southern Netherlands is marked in red Map of the Habsburg Netherlands by Alexis-Marie Gochet.png
Map of the Low Countries including Brabant (yellow). The border between the Northern and the Southern Netherlands is marked in red

The Province of Brabant ( /brəˈbænt/ , US also /brəˈbɑːnt,ˈbrɑːbənt/ , [1] [2] [3] Dutch: [ˈbraːbɑnt] ) was a province in Belgium from 1830 to 1995. It was created in 1815 as South Brabant, part of the United Kingdom of the Netherlands. [4] In 1995, it was split into the Dutch-speaking Flemish Brabant, the French-speaking Walloon Brabant and the bilingual Brussels-Capital Region. [5]

Contents

History

United Kingdom of the Netherlands

After the defeat of Napoleon in 1815, the United Kingdom of the Netherlands was created at the Congress of Vienna, consisting of territories which had been added to France by Napoleon: the former Dutch Republic and the Southern Netherlands. In the newly created kingdom, the former French département of Dyle became the new province of South Brabant, distinguishing it from Central Brabant (later Antwerp province); and from North Brabant (now part of the Netherlands), all named after the former Duchy of Brabant.

History of the Low Countries
Frisii Belgae
Cana–
nefates
Chamavi,
Tubantes
Gallia Belgica (55 BC–c.5th AD)
Germania Inferior (83–c.5th)
Salian Franks Batavi
unpopulated
(4th–c.5th)
Saxons Salian Franks
(4th–c.5th)
Frisian Kingdom
(c.6th–734)
Frankish Kingdom (481–843)Carolingian Empire (800–843)
Austrasia (511–687)
Middle Francia (843–855) West
Francia

(843–)
Kingdom of Lotharingia (855– 959)
Duchy of Lower Lorraine (959–)
Frisia

Friesland (kleine wapen).svg
Frisian
Freedom

(11–16th
century)
Wapen graafschap Holland.svg
County of
Holland

(880–1432)
Utrecht - coat of arms.png
Bishopric of
Utrecht

(695–1456)
Coat of arms of the Duchy of Brabant.svg
Duchy of
Brabant

(1183–1430)
Guelders-Julich Arms.svg
Duchy of
Guelders

(1046–1543)
Arms of Flanders.svg
County of
Flanders

(862–1384)
Hainaut Modern Arms.svg
County of
Hainaut

(1071–1432)
Arms of Namur.svg
County of
Namur

(981–1421)
Armoiries Principaute de Liege.svg
P.-Bish.
of Liège


(980–1794)
Arms of Luxembourg.svg
Duchy of
Luxem-
bourg

(1059–1443)
  Flag of the Low Countries.svg
Burgundian Netherlands (1384–1482)
Flag of the Low Countries.svg
Habsburg Netherlands (1482–1795)
(Seventeen Provinces after 1543)
 
Statenvlag.svg
Dutch Republic
(1581–1795)
Flag of the Low Countries.svg
Spanish Netherlands
(1556–1714)
 
  Austrian Low Countries Flag.svg
Austrian Netherlands
(1714–1795)
  Flag of the Brabantine Revolution.svg
United States of Belgium
(1790)
LuikVlag.svg
R. Liège
(1789–'91)
   
Flag of the navy of the Batavian Republic.svg
Batavian Republic (1795–1806)
Kingdom of Holland (1806–1810)
Flag of France.svg
associated with French First Republic (1795–1804)
part of First French Empire (1804–1815)
  
Flag of the Netherlands.svg
Princip. of the Netherlands (1813–1815)
 
Kingdom of the Netherlands (1815–1830) Flag of Luxembourg.svg
Gr D. L.
(1815–)
Flag of the Netherlands.svg
Kingdom of the Netherlands (1839–)
Flag of Belgium.svg
Kingdom of Belgium (1830–)
Flag of Luxembourg.svg
Gr D. of
Luxem-
bourg

(1890–)

The provincial governors during this time were:

Belgium

Diagram of the Belgian Province of Brabant, which was divided into Flemish Brabant (bright yellow), Walloon Brabant (bright red), and the Brussels-Capital Region (orange). Belgium province Brabant.svg
Diagram of the Belgian Province of Brabant, which was divided into Flemish Brabant (bright yellow), Walloon Brabant (bright red), and the Brussels-Capital Region (orange).

After the Belgian Revolution of 1830, the Southern Netherlands (including South and Central Brabant) became independent as Belgium and later also Luxembourg. The province was then renamed simply Brabant and became the central province of Belgium, with its capital city Brussels. The province contained three arrondissements: Brussels, Leuven and Nivelles.

In 1961–1963, the language border was established, from which the province was divided into a Dutch-speaking region, a French-speaking region and the bilingual Brussels. The Brussels arrondissement was split to this end. In 1989, Brussels-Capital Region was created, but the region was still part of the province of Brabant. In 1995, the province of Brabant was split into the Dutch-speaking Flemish Brabant, the French-speaking Walloon Brabant and the bilingual Brussels-Capital Region. The Brussels-Capital Region exercises the powers of a Province on its own territory.

Demographics

As comparison, the current two provinces of Brabant, together with Brussels, had 2,621,275 inhabitants in January 2011.

Number of inhabitants x 1000

Province of Brabant
  • Source: NIS
  • 1806 till 1970: census
  • 1980 and 1990: number of inhabitants on 1 January
  • 1994: number on 31 December

See also

Related Research Articles

Brabant is a traditional geographical region in the Low Countries of Europe. It may refer to:

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Flanders</span> Dutch-speaking northern region of Belgium

Flanders is the Dutch-speaking northern portion of Belgium and one of the communities, regions and language areas of Belgium. However, there are several overlapping definitions, including ones related to culture, language, politics, and history, and sometimes involving neighbouring countries. The demonym associated with Flanders is Fleming, while the corresponding adjective is Flemish, which can also refer to the collective of Dutch dialects spoken in that area, or more generally the Belgian variant of Standard Dutch. The official capital of Flanders is the City of Brussels, although the Brussels-Capital Region that includes it has an independent regional government. The powers of the government of Flanders consist, among others, of economic affairs in the Flemish Region and the community aspects of Flanders life in Brussels, such as Flemish culture and education.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">United Kingdom of the Netherlands</span> 1815–1830 kingdom including the Netherlands and Belgium

The United Kingdom of the Netherlands is the unofficial name given to the Kingdom of the Netherlands as it existed between 1815 and 1830. The United Netherlands was created in the aftermath of the Napoleonic Wars through the fusion of territories that had belonged to the former Dutch Republic, Austrian Netherlands, and Prince-Bishopric of Liège in order to form a buffer state between the major European powers. The polity was a constitutional monarchy, ruled by William I of the House of Orange-Nassau.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Antwerp Province</span> Province of Belgium

Antwerp Province, between 1815 and 1830 known as Central Brabant, is the northernmost province both of the Flemish Region, also called Flanders, and of Belgium. It borders on the North Brabant province of the Netherlands to the north and the Belgian provinces of Limburg, Flemish Brabant and East Flanders. Its capital is Antwerp, which includes the Port of Antwerp, the second-largest seaport in Europe. It has an area of 2,876 km2 (1,110 sq mi), and with over 1.85 million inhabitants as of January 2019, is the country's most populous province. The province consists of three arrondissements: Antwerp, Mechelen and Turnhout. The eastern part of the province comprises the main part of the Campine region.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Flemish Brabant</span> Province of Belgium

Flemish Brabant is a province of Flanders, one of the three regions of Belgium. It borders on the Belgian provinces of Antwerp, Limburg, Liège, Walloon Brabant, Hainaut and East Flanders. Flemish Brabant also surrounds the Brussels-Capital Region. Its capital is Leuven. It has an area of 2,118 km2 (818 sq mi) which is divided into two administrative districts containing 65 municipalities. As of January 2019, Flemish Brabant had a population of 1,146,175.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Walloon Brabant</span> Province of Belgium

Walloon Brabant is a province located in Belgium's French-speaking region of Wallonia. It borders on the province of Flemish Brabant and the provinces of Liège, Namur and Hainaut. Walloon Brabant's capital and largest city is Wavre.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Liège Province</span> Province of Belgium

Liège is the easternmost province of the Wallonia region of Belgium.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Communities, regions, and language areas of Belgium</span>

Belgium is a federal state comprising three communities and three regions that are based on four language areas. For each of these subdivision types, the subdivisions together make up the entire country; in other words, the types overlap.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Provinces of Belgium</span> Subdivisions of Belgium

The Kingdom of Belgium is divided into three regions. Two of these regions, Flanders and Wallonia, are each subdivided into five provinces. The third region, Brussels, does not belong to any province and nor is it subdivided into provinces. Instead, it has amalgamated both regional and provincial functions into a single "Capital Region" administration.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Waterloo, Belgium</span> Municipality in French speaking Community, Belgium

Waterloo is a municipality in Wallonia, located in the province of Walloon Brabant, Belgium, which in 2011 had a population of 29,706 and an area of 21.03 km2 (8.12 sq mi). Waterloo lies a short distance south of Brussels, and immediately north-east of the larger town of Braine-l'Alleud. It is the site of the Battle of Waterloo, where the resurgent Napoleon was defeated for the final time in 1815. Waterloo lies immediately south of the official language border between Flanders and Wallonia.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Flemish Region</span> Northernmost federal region of Belgium

The Flemish Region, usually simply referred to as Flanders, is one of the three regions of Belgium—alongside the Walloon Region and the Brussels-Capital Region. Covering the northern portion of the country, the Flemish Region is primarily Dutch-speaking. With an area of 13,522 km2 (5,221 sq mi), it accounts for only 45% of Belgium's territory, but 57% of its population. It is one of the most densely populated regions of Europe with around 490/km2 (1,300/sq mi).

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Belgian nationalism</span>

Belgian nationalism, sometimes pejoratively referred to as Belgicism, is a nationalist ideology. In its modern form it favours the reversal of federalism and the creation of a unitary state in Belgium. The ideology advocates reduced or no autonomy for the Flemish Community who constitute Flanders, the French Community of Belgium and the German-speaking Community of Belgium who constitute Wallonia and the Brussels-Capital Region which is inhabited by both Walloons and Flemings, and the dissolution of the regional counterparts of each ethnic group within Belgium.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Brussels-Halle-Vilvoorde</span> Former constituency in Belgium

The area within Belgium known as Brussels-Halle-Vilvoorde encompasses the bilingual—French and Dutch—Brussels-Capital Region, which coincides with the arrondissement of Brussels-Capital and the surrounding Dutch-speaking area of Halle-Vilvoorde, which in turn coincides with the arrondissement of Halle-Vilvoorde. Halle-Vilvoorde contains several municipalities with language facilities, i.e. municipalities where French-speaking people form a considerable part of the population and therefore have special language rights. This area forms the judicial arrondissement of Brussels, which is the location of a tribunal of first instance, enterprise tribunal and a labour tribunal. It was reformed in July 2012, as part of the sixth Belgian state reform.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Dyle (department)</span>

Dyle was a department of the French First Republic and French First Empire in present-day Belgium. It was named after the river Dyle (Dijle), which flows through the department. Its territory corresponded more or less with that of the Belgian province of Brabant, now divided into Walloon Brabant, Flemish Brabant and the Brussels-Capital Region. It was created on 1 October 1795, when the Austrian Netherlands and the Prince-Bishopric of Liège were officially annexed by the French Republic. Before the annexation, its territory was partly in the Duchy of Brabant, partly in the County of Hainaut, and partly in some smaller territories.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Duchy of Brabant</span> 1183–1794 northwestern state of the Holy Roman Empire

The Duchy of Brabant, a state of the Holy Roman Empire, was established in 1183. It developed from the Landgraviate of Brabant of 1085–1183, and formed the heart of the historic Low Countries. The Duchy comprised part of the Burgundian Netherlands from 1430 and of the Habsburg Netherlands from 1482, until it was partitioned after the Dutch revolt of 1566–1648.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Arrondissement of Brussels-Capital</span> Administrative Arrondissement in Brussels Capital Region, Belgium

The Arrondissement of Brussels-Capital is the only administrative arrondissement in the Brussels Capital Region in Belgium. Because it is the only administrative arrondissement in the Brussels Region, its territory coincides with that of the latter.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Union des Francophones</span> Political party in Belgium

The Union of Francophones is a political party in Belgium that participates as electoral lists in regional, provincial, and municipal elections in the Flemish Province of Flemish Brabant. As its name suggests, its primary target is the French-speaking community of Flemish Brabant and particularly those who live in the officially Dutch-speaking area Halle-Vilvoorde including the now predominantly French-speaking municipalities with language facilities in the Brussels Periphery. Its main goal is to provide both constitutional exemptions for and privileges to Francophones living in Dutch-speaking Flanders, for example by annexing the municipalities with language facilities to the officially bilingual Brussels-Capital Region.

The partition of Belgium is a hypothetical situation, which has been discussed by both Belgian and international media, envisioning a split of Belgium along linguistic divisions, with the Flemish Community (Flanders) and the French-speaking Community (Wallonia) becoming independent states. Alternatively, it is hypothesized that Flanders could join the Netherlands and Wallonia could join France.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">State reform in Belgium</span> Revision of Constitution of Belgium to provide equality to both Dutch and French people

State reform, in the context of Belgium, is the ongoing process of seeking and finding constitutional and legal solutions to the problems and tensions in the different segments of the Belgian population, mostly between the Dutch-speakers of Flanders and the French-speakers of Wallonia. In general, Belgium has evolved from a unitary state to a federal state with communities, regions, and language areas.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Francization of Brussels</span> Post-1700s shift from Dutch to French in the Belgian capital

The Francization of Brussels refers to the evolution, over the past two centuries, of this historically Dutch-speaking city into one where French has become the majority language and lingua franca. The main cause of this transition was the rapid, compulsory assimilation of the Flemish population, amplified by immigration from France and Wallonia.

References

  1. "Brabant". Collins English Dictionary . HarperCollins . Retrieved May 29, 2019.
  2. "Brabant" (US) and "Brabant". Lexico UK English Dictionary. Oxford University Press. Archived from the original on 2020-09-29.
  3. "Brabant". Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary . Retrieved May 29, 2019.
  4. Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Brabant (province)"  . Encyclopædia Britannica (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press.
  5. "Administratief Arrondissement Brussel-Hoofdstad". Archived from the original on 2016-08-29. Retrieved 2011-09-17.

50°47′N4°38′E / 50.783°N 4.633°E / 50.783; 4.633