Province of York

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Province of York
Dioceses of Church of England.svg
Church Church of England
Metropolitan bishop Archbishop of York
Cathedral York Minster
Dioceses 12

The Province of York, or less formally the Northern Province, is one of two ecclesiastical provinces making up the Church of England and consists of 12 dioceses which cover the northern third of England and the Isle of Man. [1] York was elevated to an archbishopric in AD 735: Ecgbert was the first archbishop. At one time the Archbishops of York also claimed metropolitan authority over Scotland but these claims were never realised and ceased when the Archdiocese of St Andrews was established.

An ecclesiastical province is one of the basic forms of jurisdiction in Christian Churches with traditional hierarchical structure, including Western Christianity and Eastern Christianity. In general, an ecclesiastical province consists of several dioceses, one of them being the archdiocese, headed by metropolitan bishop or archbishop who has ecclesiastical jurisdiction over all other bishops of the province.

Church of England Anglican state church of England

The Church of England is the established church of England. The Archbishop of Canterbury is the most senior cleric, although the monarch is the supreme governor. The Church of England is also the mother church of the international Anglican Communion. It traces its history to the Christian church recorded as existing in the Roman province of Britain by the third century, and to the 6th-century Gregorian mission to Kent led by Augustine of Canterbury.

Diocese Christian district or see under the supervision of a bishop

The word diocese is derived from the Greek term dioikesis (διοίκησις) meaning "administration". Today, when used in an ecclesiastical sense, it refers to the ecclesiastical district under the jurisdiction of a bishop. Sometimes it is also called bishopric.

The province's metropolitan bishop is the Archbishop of York (the junior of the Church of England's two archbishops). York Minster serves as the mother church of the Province of York. [2]

Metropolitan bishop ecclesiastical office

In Christian churches with episcopal polity, the rank of metropolitan bishop, or simply metropolitan, pertains to the diocesan bishop or archbishop of a metropolis.

Archbishop of York second most senior bishop of the Church of England

The Archbishop of York is a senior bishop in the Church of England, second only to the Archbishop of Canterbury. The archbishop is the diocesan bishop of the Diocese of York and the metropolitan bishop of the Province of York, which covers the northern regions of England as well as the Isle of Man. The Archbishop of York is an ex officio member of the House of Lords and is styled Primate of England.

York Minster Church in York, England

The Cathedral and Metropolitical Church of Saint Peter in York, commonly known as York Minster, is the cathedral of York, England, and is one of the largest of its kind in Northern Europe. The minster is the seat of the Archbishop of York, the third-highest office of the Church of England, and is the mother church for the Diocese of York and the Province of York. It is run by a dean and chapter, under the Dean of York. The title "minster" is attributed to churches established in the Anglo-Saxon period as missionary teaching churches, and serves now as an honorific title. Services in the minster are sometimes regarded as on the High Church or Anglo-Catholic end of the Anglican continuum.

Boundary changes since the mid-19th century

In 1836 the diocese of Ripon was formed (Ripon and Leeds from 1999), followed by further foundations: Manchester in 1847, Liverpool in 1880, Newcastle in 1882, Wakefield in 1888, Sheffield in 1914, Bradford in 1919, and Blackburn in 1926. The diocese of Southwell was a special case: in 1837 the archdeaconry of Nottingham, which until then had formed part of the diocese of York, was transferred to the diocese of Lincoln and hence to the province of Canterbury. In 1884 the counties of Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire were merged to form the new diocese of Southwell. The diocese of Derby was created in 1927, removing Derbyshire from Southwell's jurisdiction, and in 1935 the diocese of Southwell was transferred back to the province of York.

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Ripon Cathedral Church in North Yorkshire, United Kingdom

The Cathedral Church of St Peter and St Wilfrid, commonly known as Ripon Cathedral, is a cathedral in the North Yorkshire city of Ripon. Founded as a monastery by Scottish monks in the 660s, it was refounded as a Benedictine monastery by St Wilfrid in 672. The church became collegiate in the tenth century, and acted as a mother church within the large Diocese of York for the remainder of the Middle Ages.. The present church is the fourth, and was built between the 13th and 16th centuries. In 1836 the church became the cathedral for the Diocese of Ripon. In 2014 the Diocese was incorporated into the new Diocese of Leeds, and the church became one of three co-equal cathedrals of the Bishop of Leeds.

The Bishop of Ripon is an episcopal title which takes its name after the city of Ripon in North Yorkshire, England. The bishop is one of the area bishops of the Diocese of Leeds in the Province of York. The area bishop of Ripon has oversight of the archdeaconry of Richmond and Craven, which consists of the deaneries of Bowland, Ewecross, Harrogate, Richmond, Ripon, Skipton, and Wensley.

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Province of Canterbury ecclesiastical province of the Church of England

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The Diocese of York is an administrative division of the Church of England, part of the Province of York. It covers the city of York, the eastern part of North Yorkshire, and most of the East Riding of Yorkshire.

Southwell Minster Church in Nottinghamshire, United Kingdom

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Diocese of Southwell and Nottingham

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Anglican Bishop of Leeds Diocesan bishop in the Church of England

The Anglican Bishop of Leeds is the ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of Leeds in the Province of York.

Anglican Diocese of Leeds Anglican diocese

The Anglican Diocese of Leeds is a diocese of the Church of England, in the Province of York. It is the largest diocese in England by area, comprising much of western Yorkshire: almost the whole of West Yorkshire, the western part of North Yorkshire, the town of Barnsley in South Yorkshire, and most of the parts of County Durham, Cumbria and Lancashire which lie within the historic boundaries of Yorkshire. It includes the cities of Leeds, Bradford, Wakefield and Ripon. It was created on 20 April 2014 following a review of the dioceses in Yorkshire and the dissolution of the dioceses of Bradford, Ripon and Leeds, and Wakefield.

References

  1. Cannon, John (2002). "York, metropolitan diocese of". The Oxford Companion to British History. Oxford University Press. Retrieved 8 August 2009.
  2. "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 8 February 2017. Retrieved 11 July 2017.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)