Ptolemy of Aloros

Last updated

Ptolemy of Aloros (Greek : Πτολεμαῖος), was sent by King Amyntas III of Macedon as an envoy to Athens c. 375–373 BC. After Amyntas' death, he began a liaison with his widow, Eurydice. In 368 BC, he assassinated her son, Alexander II, in order to gain control of the throne. His actions were not well-regarded by the leading families of Macedon, who called in the Theban general, Pelopidas, to re-establish peace. As part of the peace settlement, Philip, Alexander II's younger brother, was taken as a hostage back to Thebes. As Alexander II's elder brother, Perdiccas III, was under-age when Alexander II was killed, Ptolemy of Aloros ruled as regent.

Greek language language spoken in Greece, Cyprus and Southern Albania

Greek is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece, Cyprus and other parts of the Eastern Mediterranean and the Black Sea. It has the longest documented history of any living Indo-European language, spanning more than 3000 years of written records. Its writing system has been the Greek alphabet for the major part of its history; other systems, such as Linear B and the Cypriot syllabary, were used previously. The alphabet arose from the Phoenician script and was in turn the basis of the Latin, Cyrillic, Armenian, Coptic, Gothic, and many other writing systems.

Amyntas III of Macedon King of Macedonia

Amyntas III was king of the ancient Greek kingdom of Macedon in 393 BC, and again from 392 to 370 BC. He was the son of Arrhidaeus and grandson of Amyntas, one of the sons of Alexander I. His most famous son is Philip II, father of Alexander the Great. He is historically considered the founder of the unified Macedonian state.

Ptolemy ruled as a regent for Perdiccas III until Perdiccas killed him in 365 BC.

Perdiccas III of Macedon King of Macedonia

Perdiccas III was king of the ancient Greek kingdom of Macedonia from 365 BC to 360 BC, succeeding his brother Alexander II.

It is suggested that Ptolemy was descended from Amyntas II's brother, Menelaus, son of Alexander I.

Amyntas II of Macedon 5th-century Macedonian ruler

Amyntas II or Amyntas the Little, was the king of Macedonia for a short time, circa 393 BC. Thucydides describes him as a son of Philip, the brother of king Perdiccas II. He first succeeded his father in his appanage in Upper Macedonia, but Perdiccas II wished to deprive Amyntas of the appanage, as he had before endeavoured to wrest it from Philip. This project had however been hindered by the Athenians.

Menelaus of Macedon may refer to:

Alexander I of Macedon

Alexander I of Macedon, known with the title Philhellene was the ruler of the ancient Greek kingdom of Macedon from c. 498 BC until his death in 454 BC. He was succeeded by his eldest son, Alcetas II.

Related Research Articles

323 BC Year

Year 323 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Longus and Cerretanus. The denomination 323 BC for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

This article concerns the period 369 BC – 360 BC

Year 359 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Laenas and Imperiosus. The denomination 359 BC for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Year 368 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Tribunate of Cornelius, Praetextatus, Structus, Capitolinus, Crassus and Cicurinus. The denomination 368 BC for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Year 365 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Aventinensis and Ahala. The denomination 365 BC for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Ptolemy I Soter Macedonian general

Ptolemy I Soter was a companion and historian of Alexander the Great of the Kingdom of Macedon in northern Greece who became ruler of Egypt, part of Alexander's former empire. Ptolemy was pharaoh of Ptolemaic Egypt from 305/304 to 282 BC. He was the founder of the Ptolemaic dynasty which ruled Egypt until the death of Cleopatra in 30 BC, turning the country into a Hellenistic kingdom and Alexandria into a center of Greek culture.

Alexander IV of Macedon sovereign

Alexander IV, erroneously called sometimes in modern times Aegus, was the son of Alexander the Great and Princess Roxana of Bactria.

Antipater Macedonian general

Antipater was a Macedonian general and statesman under kings Philip II of Macedon and Alexander the Great, and father of King Cassander. In 320 BC, he became regent of all of Alexander the Great's Empire.

<i>Diadochi</i>

The Diadochi were the rival generals, families, and friends of Alexander the Great who fought for control over his empire after his death in 323 BCE. The Wars of the Diadochi mark the beginning of the Hellenistic period from the Mediterranean to the Indus River Valley.

The Wars of the Diadochi, or Wars of Alexander's Successors, were a series of conflicts fought between Alexander the Great's generals over the rule of his vast empire after his death. They occurred between 322 and 275 BC.

Alexander II of Macedon was king of the ancient Greek kingdom of Macedon in 371–369 BC, following the death of his father Amyntas III.

Amyntas IV was a titular king of the ancient Greek kingdom of Macedonia in 359 BC and member of the Argead dynasty.

Eurydice was an ancient Greek queen from Macedon, wife of king Amyntas III of Macedon.

The Partition of Triparadisus was a power-sharing agreement passed at Triparadisus in 321 BC between the generals (Diadochi) of Alexander the Great, in which they named a new regent and arranged the repartition of the satrapies of Alexander's empire among themselves. It followed and modified the Partition of Babylon made in 323 BC upon Alexander's death.

<i>Funeral Games</i> (novel) book by Mary Renault

Funeral Games is a 1981 historical novel by Mary Renault, dealing with the death of Alexander the Great and its aftermath, the gradual disintegration of his empire. It is the final book of her Alexander trilogy.

Alcetas II was king of the ancient Greek kingdom of Macedon.