Public Printer of the United States

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The Public Printer of the United States was the head of the United States Government Publishing Office (GPO). Pursuant to 44 U.S.C.   § 301, this officer was nominated by the President of the United States and approved by the United States Senate. In December 2014, Congress passed and President Obama signed into law H.R. 83, which consolidated and continued appropriations for FY 2015. [1] Section 1301 of that act changed the name of the Government Printing Office to the Government Publishing Office and the title of Public Printer to Director. [2] Thus, Davita Vance-Cooks was the last Public Printer of the United States and the first Director of the U.S. Government Publishing Office.

Contents

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William J. Boarman
Davita Vance-Cooks, Public Printer of the United States.jpg
Davita E. Vance-Cooks
Hugh N. Halpern.jpg
Hugh N. Halpern (2nd Director)

The Public Printer is responsible for the administration of the GPO. The GPO, a legislative agency of the government, provides electronic access to and produces most printed matter for government, including the Congressional Record, Supreme Court decisions, passports, tax forms, internal government documents, and agency publications. The GPO does not print money, as that is a duty of the Bureau of Engraving and Printing.

History

Benjamin Franklin served as Public Printer for several of the American colonies prior to the establishment of the United States. The House and Senate had separate printers until 1861, when the GPO was established; its first superintendent was John D. Defrees. The first man with the title Public Printer of the United States was Almon M. Clapp. [3]

List of Public Printers

  1. Almon M. Clapp (1876–1877)
  2. John D. Defrees (1877–1882)
  3. Sterling P. Rounds (1882–1886)
  4. Thomas E. Benedict (1886–1889)
  5. Francis W. Palmer (1889–1894)
  6. Thomas E. Benedict (1894–1897)
  7. Francis W. Palmer (1897–1905)
  8. Charles A. Stillings (1905–1908)
  9. John S. Leech (1908)
  10. Samuel B. Donnelly (1908–1913)
  11. Cornelius Ford (1913–1921)
  12. George H. Carter (1921–1934)
  13. Augustus E. Giegengack (1934–1948)
  14. John J. Deviny (1948–1953)
  15. Raymond Blattenberger (1953–1961)
  16. James L. Harrison (1961–1970) [4]
  17. Adolphus N. Spence (1970–1972)
  18. Thomas F. McCormick (1973–1977)
  19. John J. Boyle (1977–1980)
  20. Danford L. Sawyer, Jr. (1981–1984)
  21. Ralph E. Kennickell, Jr. (1984–1988)
  22. Robert Houk (1990–1993) [5]
  23. Michael F. DiMario (1993-2002) [6]
  24. Bruce James (2002–2006) [7] [8]
  25. Robert C. Tapella (2007–2010) [9] -2010 [10]
  26. William J. Boarman (2011–2012)
  27. Davita E. Vance-Cooks (2012–2017) [11]
  28. Hugh N. Halpern (2019–present)

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44th United States Congress

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46th United States Congress

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47th United States Congress

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Robert C. Tapella

Robert Charles "Bob" Tapella was the 25th Public Printer of the United States, the head of the U.S. Government Printing Office (GPO), which produces and distributes information products for all branches of the U.S. Government.

William J. Boarman

William Joseph Boarman was the 26th Public Printer of the United States. A former American printer, labor union leader, and government consultant, he has served as Senior Vice-President of the Communications Workers of America (CWA) and President of that union's Printing, Publishing & Media Works Sector.

Davita Vance-Cooks

Davita Vance-Cooks is an American business executive who served as the 27th Public Printer of the United States and the 1st Director of the U.S. Government Publishing Office (GPO). Vance-Cooks is a business executive with more than 30 years of private sector and federal government management experience. She was the first woman and first African-American to lead the agency, whose mission since its establishment in 1861 is to Keep America Informed. As the provider of official federal government information in digital and printed formats, the GPO produces the Congressional Record, the Federal Register, U.S. passports, and a wide variety of other publications. The agency provides free public access to government information products through federal depository libraries nationwide as well as free online access via GPO's Federal Digital System.

The Printing Act of 1895, was a law designed to centralize in the United States Government Printing Office the printing, binding, and distribution of U.S. Government documents. The Act revised public printing laws and established the roles of the Federal Depository Library Program (FDLP) and the Government Printing Office (GPO) in distributing government information. The act also assigned leadership of the program to the Superintendent of Public Documents, who would be under the control of the GPO,

Almon M. Clapp

Almon Mason Clapp was an American printer and politician, and the first person to hold the title Public Printer of the United States, from 1876–77.

References

  1. "H.R. 83 Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act 2015" (PDF). govinfo.gov.
  2. "U.S. GPO press release". December 17, 2014. Retrieved July 11, 2016.
  3. http://www.gpo.gov/su_docs/fdlp/history/macgilvray.html
  4. "James L. Harrison, 94, Dies; Public Printer of the U.S." The Washington Post. October 10, 2000. Archived from the original on November 2, 2012. Retrieved December 20, 2009.
  5. Cross, Lisa (June 1, 2001). "PIA Backs a Nominee For Public Printer Post.(Printing Industries of America, Robert Houk)". Graphic Arts Monthly. Archived from the original on October 25, 2012. Retrieved December 20, 2009.
  6. ALAWON, Volume 2, Number 51, November 13, 1993. bubl.ac.uk
  7. "BRUCE R. JAMES". United States Public Printer. Retrieved May 22, 2014.
  8. Morrison, Jane Ann (March 29, 2002). "Nomination Planned: Bush to tap Nevadan for top printing post". Las Vegas Review-Journal (Las Vegas, NV). Retrieved December 20, 2009.
  9. http://www.gpo.gov/management/tapella.htm
  10. "Presidential Nominations Sent to the Senate, 4/19/10". Whitehouse.gov. April 19, 2010. Archived from the original on August 18, 2010. Retrieved October 6, 2013.
  11. Hicks, Josh (August 2, 2013). "Davita Vance-Cooks confirmed as first female and African American public printer". Washingtonpost.com. Retrieved October 6, 2013.