Pungso County

Last updated
Pungsŏ County
풍서군
County
Korean transcription(s)
   Chosŏn'gŭl
   Hancha 西
   McCune-Reischauer P'ungsŏ-gun
   Revised Romanization Pungseo-gun
DPRK2006 Ryanggang-Pungso.PNG
Map of Ryanggang showing the location of Pungso
Country North Korea
Province Ryanggang
Administrative divisions 1 ŭp, 3 workers' districts, 17 ri
Area
  Total1,812 km2 (700 sq mi)
Population (1991(est.))
  Total33,000

P'ungsŏ County is a kun, or county, in Ryanggang province, North Korea. It was formed after the division of Korea from portions of Kimhyŏnggwŏn (then P'ungsan) and Kapsan counties.

Administrative divisions of North Korea

The administrative divisions of North Korea are organized into three hierarchical levels. These divisions were discovered in 2002. Many of the units have equivalents in the system of South Korea. At the highest level are nine provinces, two directly governed cities, and three special administrative divisions. The second-level divisions are cities, counties, wards, and districts. These are further subdivided into third-level entities: towns, neighborhoods, villages, and workers' districts.

Ryanggang Province Province in Kwannam, North Korea

Ryanggang Province is a province in North Korea. The province is bordered by China (Jilin) on the north, North Hamgyong on the east, South Hamgyong on the south, and Chagang on the west. Ryanggang was formed in 1954, when it was separated from South Hamgyŏng. The provincial capital is Hyesan. In South Korean usage, "Ryanggang" is spelled and pronounced as "Yanggang"

North Korea Sovereign state in East Asia

North Korea, officially the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, is a country in East Asia constituting the northern part of the Korean Peninsula, with Pyongyang the capital and the largest city in the country. To the north and northwest, the country is bordered by China and by Russia along the Amnok and Tumen rivers and to the south it is bordered by South Korea, with the heavily fortified Korean Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) separating the two. Nevertheless, North Korea, like its southern counterpart, claims to be the legitimate government of the entire peninsula and adjacent islands.

Contents

Geography

Lying atop the southern portion of the Kaema Plateau, P'ungsŏ is heavily mountainous. In general, the mountains are higher in the northwest and lower toward the southeast. They include the Puksubaek range; the highest point is Puksubaeksan itself. The chief rivers are the Hŏch'ŏn and the Nŭnggwi (능귀강). P'ungsŏ Lake, an artificial reservoir, lies in the middle of the county. Some 91% of P'ungsŏ's area is covered with forestland.

Kaema Plateau landform

The Kaema Plateau is a highland in North Korea. It is surrounded by the Rangrim Mountains, the Macheollyeong Mountains and the Bujeollyeong Mountains. Elevation varies between 700 and 2,000 meters and is approximately 40,000 square kilometers. The Kaema Plateau slopes downward towards the northern border of the People's Republic of China and is the largest tableland in Korea; it is often called "The roof of Korea". In North Korea, the Kaema Plateau is divided into Kaema Plateau, Jagang Plateau, and Baekmu Plateau. Up to approximately one million years ago, the Kaema Plateau was an extension of the Manchurian plains, as such the rivers Hochon and Changjin were tributaries of Songhua River, however basalt from Baekdu Mountain accumulated in Changbai Korean Autonomous County, directing the rivers into Amnok River in modern times, consequently valleys were formed by the tributaries in the ensuing millennia. Some flat terrain still remains in some part in southeastern part of the plateau.

Administrative divisions

P'ungsŏ county is divided into 1 ŭp (town), 3 rodongjagu (workers' districts) and 17 ri (villages):

  • P'ungsŏ-ŭp (풍서읍/豊西邑)
  • Happ'o-rodongjagu (합포로동자구/合浦勞動者區)
  • Sŏch'ang-rodongjagu (서창로동자구/西昌勞動者區)
  • Yaksu-rodongjagu (약수로동자구/藥水勞動者區)
  • Hwaŭl-li (회은리/會隱里)
  • Kwanhŭng-ri (관흥리/館興里)
  • Kwibong-ri (귀복리/貴福里)
  • Muha-ri (무하리/舞下里)
  • Munjo-ri (문조리/文藻里)
  • Naep'o-ri (내포리/內浦里)
  • Rimsŏ-ri (림서리/林西里)
  • Rohŭng-ri (로흥리/櫓興里)
  • Ryongmul-li (룡문리/龍門里)
  • Sang-ri (상리/上里)
  • Sinch'ang-ri (신창리/新昌里)
  • Sindŏng-ri (신덕리/新德里)
  • Sinmyŏng-ri (신명리/新明里)
  • Sŏg'u-ri (석우리/石禹里)
  • Soksil-li (속신리/俗新里)
  • Up'o-ri (우포리/隅浦里)
  • Yusangha-ri (유상하리/楡上下里)

Economy

Logging is the chief industry in P'ungsŏ. There is little agriculture, due to the rugged terrain. However, some amounts of maize, potatoes, and wheat are produced on dry-field farms; livestock are also raised. The county is known for the production of bracken fern. The county is home to deposits of gold, lead and zinc.

Logging the cutting, skidding, on-site processing, and loading of trees or logs onto transport vehicles

Logging is the cutting, skidding, on-site processing, and loading of trees or logs onto trucks or skeleton cars.

Bracken genus of plants, the Brackens

Bracken (Pteridium) is a genus of large, coarse ferns in the family Dennstaedtiaceae. Ferns (Pteridophyta) are vascular plants that have alternating generations, large plants that produce spores and small plants that produce sex cells. Brackens are noted for their large, highly divided leaves. They are found on all continents except Antarctica and in all environments except deserts, though their typical habitat is moorland. The genus probably has the widest distribution of any fern in the world.

Transportation

The county is served by road, but not by rail. The Nŭnggwi River and P'ungsŏ Lake are used to transport raw lumber downstream.

See also

Geography of North Korea

North Korea is located in East Asia on the Northern half of the Korean Peninsula.

Korean language Language spoken in Korea

The Korean language is an East Asian language spoken by about 77 million people. It is a member of the Koreanic language family and is the official and national language of both Koreas: North Korea and South Korea, with different standardized official forms used in each country. It is also one of the two official languages in the Yanbian Korean Autonomous Prefecture and Changbai Korean Autonomous County of Jilin province, China. It is also spoken in parts of Sakhalin, Ukraine and Central Asia.

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