Pwa Saw of Thitmahti

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Pwa Saw of Thitmahti
သစ်မထီး ဖွားစော
Chief queen consort of Pagan
Reign1289 – 1325
Predecessor Pwa Saw as Queen of Burma
Successorunknown
Bornc. 1250s
Pagan (Bagan)
Diedin or after 1334 [note 1]
Pagan
Pinya Kingdom
Spouse Kyawswa
Saw Hnit
Issue Theingapati
Kumara Kassapa
House Pagan
Religion Theravada Buddhism

Pwa Saw of Thitmahti (Burmese : သစ်မထီး ဖွားစော, [θɪʔmətʰí pʰwá sɔ́] or [θəmətʰí pʰwá sɔ́] ) was the chief queen consort of King Kyawswa, and of King Saw Hnit of the Pagan Dynasty of Burma (Myanmar). The royal chronicles identify Saw Soe as the chief queen of Kyawswa [1] but historians identify her as the chief queen. She was the mother of Crown Prince Theingapati and Kumara Kassapa. [2]

Contents

Thitmahti was one of the three historical Pagan period queens known by the epithet of Pwa Saw (lit. "Queen Grandmother", or queen dowager). [3] According to an analysis of the contemporary stone inscriptions by Ba Shin, she was a younger sister of Queen Saw Hla Wun, and she may have succeeded her sister as the chief queen only in 1295/96. [4] But not everyone accepts that Hla Wun was a queen of Kyawswa, two decades her junior, or that Thitmahti was a sister of Hla Wun. [note 2]

Notes

  1. (Ba Shin 1982: 42): G.H. Luce takes the inscription at the Thissawaddy Pagoda dated to 1334 as evidence as she was alive then. Ba Shin (Ba Shin 1982: 45) points out that the inscription, which was donated by one her servants, does not explicitly say that the dowager queen was still alive. He nonetheless agrees with Luce that she was probably still alive.
  2. (Maha Yazawin Vol. 1 2006: 234, footnote 1): The editors of the 2006 edition of Maha Yazawin from the Universities Historical Research Department agree that there were three Pwa Saws in the late Pagan period. But they do not say that Hla Wun was Kyawswa's queen, or that Saw Hla Wun and Saw Thamathi were sisters. Since Ba Shin's date of her death depends on the two queens being sisters, the editors seem to be staying with the chronicle narrative that Hla Wun lived beyond 1296.

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References

  1. Hmannan Vol. 1 2003: 360
  2. Ba Shin 1982: 47
  3. Ba Shin 1982: 22–25
  4. Ba Shin 1982: 41–43

Bibliography

Pwa Saw of Thitmahti
Born:c. 1250s Died: in/after 1334
Royal titles
Preceded by
Saw Hla Wun
Chief queen consort of Pagan
1289 – 1325
Succeeded by
unknown