Pyramid Peak (Colorado)

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Pyramid Peak
Pyramid Peak.jpg
Pyramid Peak as seen from Maroon Peak in 2009
Highest point
Elevation 14,025 ft (4,275 m) [1] [2]
Prominence 1,638 ft (499 m) [3]
Parent peak Maroon Peak
Isolation 2.09 mi (3.36 km) [3]
Listing Colorado Fourteener 47th
Coordinates 39°04′18″N106°57′01″W / 39.0716843°N 106.9501651°W / 39.0716843; -106.9501651 Coordinates: 39°04′18″N106°57′01″W / 39.0716843°N 106.9501651°W / 39.0716843; -106.9501651 [1]
Geography
USA Colorado location map.svg
Red triangle with thick white border.svg
Pyramid Peak
Location Pitkin County, Colorado, U.S [4]
Parent range Elk Mountains [3]
Topo map USGS 7.5' topographic map
Maroon Bells, Colorado
Climbing
First ascent 1909 by Percy Hagerman and Harold Clark
Easiest route Exposed scramble, class 4

Pyramid Peak is a fourteen thousand foot mountain in the U.S. state of Colorado. It is the 47th highest mountain peak in Colorado, and 78th highest peak in the United States. It is located in the Elk Mountains in southeastern Pitkin County, approximately 12 miles (19 km) southwest of Aspen. The summit somewhat resembles a ragged square pyramid and is visible from the Roaring Fork River valley north of Aspen along the canyon of Maroon Creek.

Contents

Like many of the peaks in the Elks, Pyramid Peak is quite steep, especially compared to more gentle fourteeners such as Mount Elbert. For example, the peak's summit rises 4,000 feet (1,200 m) above Crater Lake to the northwest in only 1.2 miles (1.9 km), and 4,400 feet (1,300 m) above East Maroon Creek to the east of the peak in the same horizontal distance. [5]

Climbing

View of Pyramid Peak from Aspen Highlands Aspen Highlands Highlands Pyramid Peak.jpg
View of Pyramid Peak from Aspen Highlands

The standard climbing routes on Pyramid Peak are the northeast and northwest ridges (the latter is also known as the "Keyhole Route"). These routes involve difficult route finding (very difficult, in the case of the northwest ridge), high exposure, and a great deal of loose rock. Hence they are two of the most difficult and dangerous of all of the standard routes on the Colorado fourteeners. [6]

See also

Related Research Articles

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Elk Mountains (Colorado)

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Mount Sopris

Mount Sopris is a twin-summit mountain in the northwestern Elk Mountains range of the Rocky Mountains of North America. The 12,965-foot (3,952 m) mountain is located in the Maroon Bells-Snowmass Wilderness of White River National Forest, 6.6 miles (10.7 km) north by northeast of the community of Redstone in Pitkin County, Colorado, United States.

Snowmass Mountain

Snowmass Mountain is a fourteen thousand foot tall mountain in the U.S. state of Colorado, and is the thirty-fourth highest mountain peak in the state. Located in the Elk Mountains, within the Maroon Bells-Snowmass Wilderness of the White River National Forest, it lies along the border between the Pitkin and Gunnison counties, west of Aspen and southwest of the town of Snowmass Village.

Mount Antero

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White River National Forest

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El Diente Peak

El Diente Peak is a high summit in the San Miguel Mountains range of the Rocky Mountains of North America. The 14,165-foot (4,317 m) peak is located in the Lizard Head Wilderness of San Juan National Forest, 10.5 miles (16.9 km) north by east of the Town of Rico in Dolores County, Colorado, United States. "El Diente" is Spanish for "The Tooth", a reference to the shape of the peak.

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San Luis Peak

San Luis Peak is the highest summit of the La Garita Mountains range in the Rocky Mountains of North America. The prominent 14,022-foot (4273.8 m) fourteener is located in the Gunnison National Forest portion of the La Garita Wilderness in Saguache County approximately 10 miles (16 km) north of Creede. It is situated rather far to the east of the other fourteeners in the San Juans, and has more of a wilderness setting than many of the others.

Pigeon Peak

Pigeon Peak, elevation 13,978 ft (4,260 m), is a summit in the Needle Mountains, a subrange of the San Juan Mountains in the southwestern part of the US State of Colorado. It rises dramatically on the east side of the Animas River, 1.5 miles (2.4 km) west of the fourteener Mount Eolus. It is located in the Weminuche Wilderness, part of the San Juan National Forest.

Snowmass Peak

Snowmass Peak in the U.S. state of Colorado dominates the view from Snowmass Lake. It is often mistaken for Snowmass Mountain, the thirty-fourth highest mountain peak in the state, as well as for Hagerman Peak. Snowmass Peak is not really a peak but the lower end of Hagerman Peak's east ridge. Natural forced perspective causes the optical illusion that Snowmass Peak is higher than Hagerman Peak though it is actually 221 ft shorter than Hagerman's summit. This illusion combined with its striking rise behind Snowmass Lake justifies it being a named point on USGS topographical maps. It is located in the Elk Mountains, within the Maroon Bells-Snowmass Wilderness of the White River National Forest. It lies along the border between Pitkin and Gunnison counties, west of Aspen and southwest of the town of Snowmass Village.

Cathedral Peak (Colorado)

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References

  1. 1 2 "PYRAMID". NGS data sheet. U.S. National Geodetic Survey . Retrieved October 21, 2014.
  2. The elevation of Pyramid Peak includes an adjustment of +2.009 m (+6.59 ft) from NGVD 29 to NAVD 88.
  3. 1 2 3 "Pyramid Peak, Colorado". Peakbagger.com. Retrieved October 21, 2014.
  4. "Pyramid Peak". Geographic Names Information System . United States Geological Survey . Retrieved November 13, 2014.
  5. "Pyramid Peak". TopoQuest. Retrieved 2008-12-01.
  6. Dawson, Louis W., II (1994). Dawson's Guide to Colorado's Fourteeners . Volume 1. Blue Clover Press. ISBN   0-9628867-1-8.