Queanbeyan

Last updated

Queanbeyan
New South Wales
QueanbeyanSky.jpg
Australia New South Wales location map blank.svg
Red pog.svg
Queanbeyan
Location in New South Wales
Coordinates 35°21′12″S149°14′03″E / 35.35333°S 149.23417°E / -35.35333; 149.23417 Coordinates: 35°21′12″S149°14′03″E / 35.35333°S 149.23417°E / -35.35333; 149.23417
Population36,348 (2016 census) [1]
 • Density210/km2 (540/sq mi)
Established1838
Elevation576 m (1,890 ft)
Area173 km2 (66.8 sq mi)
Time zone AEST (UTC+10:00)
 • Summer (DST)AEDT (UTC+11:00)
Location14.9 km (9 mi) from Canberra
LGA(s) Queanbeyan-Palerang Regional Council
County Murray
Parish Queanbeyan
State electorate(s) Monaro
Federal Division(s) Eden-Monaro
City of Queanbeyan coat of arms.jpg
Localities around Queanbeyan:
Beard Oaks Estate Queanbeyan East
Crestwood Queanbeyan Queanbeyan East
Queanbeyan West Karabar Greenleigh

Queanbeyan /ˈkwnbiən/ is a city in south-eastern region of the Australian state of New South Wales, located adjacent to the Australian Capital Territory in the Southern Tablelands region. Located on the Queanbeyan River, the city is the council seat of the Queanbeyan-Palerang Regional Council. At the 2016 census, the Queanbeyan part of the Canberra–Queanbeyan built-up area had a population of 36,348. [1]

New South Wales State of Australia

New South Wales is a state on the east coast of Australia. It borders Queensland to the north, Victoria to the south, and South Australia to the west. Its coast borders the Tasman Sea to the east. The Australian Capital Territory is an enclave within the state. New South Wales' state capital is Sydney, which is also Australia's most populous city. In September 2018, the population of New South Wales was over 8 million, making it Australia's most populous state. Just under two-thirds of the state's population, 5.1 million, live in the Greater Sydney area. Inhabitants of New South Wales are referred to as New South Welshmen.

Australian Capital Territory Federal territory of Australia, containing the capital city, Canberra

The Australian Capital Territory, formerly known as the Federal Capital Territory until 1938 and commonly referred to as the ACT, is a federal territory of Australia containing the Australian capital city of Canberra and some surrounding townships. It is located in the south-east of the country and enclaved within the state of New South Wales. Founded after federation as the seat of government for the new nation, all important institutions of the Australian federal government are centred in the Territory.

Southern Tablelands Region in New South Wales, Australia

The Southern Tablelands is a geographic area of New South Wales, Australia, located south-west of Sydney and west of the Great Dividing Range.

Contents

Queanbeyan's economy is based on light construction, manufacturing, service, retail and agriculture. Canberra, Australia's capital, is located just 15 kilometres (9 miles) to the west, and Queanbeyan has to some extent become a commuter town. The word Queanbeyan is the anglicised form of Quinbean, an Aboriginal word meaning "clear waters".

Canberra capital city of Australia

Canberra is the capital city of Australia. With a population of 410,301, it is Australia's largest inland city and the eighth-largest city overall. The city is located at the northern end of the Australian Capital Territory, 280 km (170 mi) south-west of Sydney, and 660 km (410 mi) north-east of Melbourne. A resident of Canberra is known as a Canberran. Although Canberra is the capital and seat of government, many federal government ministries have secondary seats in state capital cities, as do the Governor-General and the Prime Minister.

Commuter town urban community that is primarily residential, from which most of the workforce commutes out

A commuter town is a populated area with residents who normally work elsewhere, but in which they live, eat and sleep. The term additionally implies a community that has little commercial or industrial activity beyond a small amount of locally oriented retail business. Such as Scranton.

History

The town grew from a squattage held by ex-convict and inn keeper, Timothy Beard, on the banks of the Molonglo River in what is now Oaks Estate. The town centre of Queanbeyan is located on the Queanbeyan River, a tributary of the Molonglo River and approximately 1.4 kilometres (0.87 mi) south-southeast of Oaks Estate.

A convict is "a person found guilty of a crime and sentenced by a court" or "a person serving a sentence in prison". Convicts are often also known as "prisoners" or "inmates" or by the slang term "con", while a common label for former convicts, especially those recently released from prison, is "ex-con" ("ex-convict"). Persons convicted and sentenced to non-custodial sentences tend not to be described as "convicts".

Molonglo River river in Australia

The Molonglo River, a perennial river that is part of the Murrumbidgee catchment within the Murray–Darling basin, is located in the Monaro and Capital Country regions of New South Wales and the Australian Capital Territory, in Australia.

Queanbeyan River river in Australia

The Queanbeyan River, a perennial stream that is part of the Molonglo catchment within the Murray–Darling basin, is located in the Monaro and Capital Country regions of New South Wales and the Australian Capital Territory, in Australia. The river is 104 kilometres (65 mi) in length with a catchment area of 96,000 hectares. The Queanbeyan River and the Cotter River meet the potable water supply needs of the Canberra and Queanbeyan region and whose water quality is specifically protected under Federal legislation.

Queanbeyan was officially proclaimed a township in 1838 when the population was about 50. The local parish was also known by that name and later still the member for the electorate of Queanbeyan held a seat in the legislative assembly of the colony of NSW. On 28 November 1837 the Colonial Secretary announced the appointment of Captain Alured Tasker Faunce as resident police magistrate at Queanbeyan. His homestead, called Dodsworth, was situated on the banks of the Queanbeyan river opposite the town. [2]

Traces of gold were discovered in 1851 and lead and silver mines also flourished briefly. Settlers were harassed by bushrangers, of which James Shaw, William Millet, and John Rueben, [3] John Tennant, Jacky Jacky, Frank Gardiner and Ben Hall were some of the more notorious. In 1836, a Post Office was established. [4]

Bushranger runaway convict during the British settlement of Australia

Bushrangers were originally escaped convicts in the early years of the British settlement of Australia who used the Australian bush as a refuge to hide from the authorities. By the 1820s, the term "bushranger" had evolved to refer to those who took up "robbery under arms" as a way of life, using the bush as their base.


John Tennant was an Australian bushranger who was active around the Canberra district in the 1820s. Mount Tennent is named after him as it was on the slopes of this steep mountain behind the village of Tharwa where he would hide.

William Westwood (bushranger) bushranger

William Westwood, also known as Jackey Jackey, was an English-born convict who became a bushranger in Australia.

The Commercial Banking Company of Sydney Limited (CBC, now part of the National Australia Bank) opened in Queanbeyan on 19 September 1859. The Bank of New South Wales began service in Queanbeyan in 1878. The Golden Age (now The Queanbeyan Age ) was Queanbeyan's first newspaper and was founded in 1860 by John Gale. In 1880 the residence of John James Wright, the first mayor of Queanbeyan, was constructed along the edge of the Queanbeyan River. In 1982 that building became the Queanbeyan Art Centre.

The Commercial Banking Company of Sydney Limited was a bank based in Sydney, Australia. It was established in 1834, and in 1982 merged with the National Bank of Australasia to form National Australia Bank.

National Australia Bank financial institution in Australia

National Australia Bank is one of the four largest financial institutions in Australia in terms of market capitalisation, earnings and customers. NAB was ranked 21st largest bank in the world measured by market capitalisation and 41st largest bank in the world as measured by total assets in 2014, falling to 49th largest in March 2016. As of November 2014 NAB operated 1,590 branches and service centres; and 4,412 ATMs across Australia, New Zealand and Asia serving 12.7 million customers.

Westpac Banking Corporation, commonly known as Westpac, is an Australian bank and financial-services provider headquartered at Westpac Place in Sydney. It was established in 1982 as a merger of the Bank of New South Wales and the Commercial Bank of Australia. It is one of Australia's "big four" banks. Its name is a portmanteau of "Western" and "Pacific".

The Salvation Army claimed an outpost in Queanbeyan in 1884.

Queanbeyan, an increasingly successful primary producing district, was proclaimed a Municipality in February 1885 incorporating an area of 5,700 acres (23 km2). The railway reached Queanbeyan railway station in 1887 and it became the junction for the lines going to Canberra and Bombala. The town is served by the thrice-daily NSW TrainLink Xplorer service between Canberra and Sydney.

Bridge near the centre of town over the river Queanbeyan river030.jpg
Bridge near the centre of town over the river
Royal Hotel in Queanbeyan, built 1926 Queanbeyan royal hotel.jpg
Royal Hotel in Queanbeyan, built 1926
Queanbeyan Solar Farm established 1999 Queabeyan Solar Farm.jpg
Queanbeyan Solar Farm established 1999
The "Q" - Queanbeyan Performing Arts Centre TheQ.jpg
The "Q" – Queanbeyan Performing Arts Centre
A former monastery, St Benedicts now houses a number of local businesses St Benedicts Queanbeyan.jpg
A former monastery, St Benedicts now houses a number of local businesses
Queanbeyan's "Tidy Town" awards are proudly displayed on the Queanbeyan Council Chambers Building (c. 1927) Queanbeyan City Council Chambers.jpg
Queanbeyan's "Tidy Town" awards are proudly displayed on the Queanbeyan Council Chambers Building (c. 1927)

William James Farrer, the wheat experimentalist, established Queanbeyan's reputation as an agricultural district with his famous "Federation" rust-free strain, developed on his property "Lambrigg" at Tharwa. Farrer's work was only slowly recognised elsewhere in Australia, but local farmers supported him, particularly in his development of "Blount's Lambrigg", another strain which in 1889 gave hope to farmers after the disastrous season of 1887 when crops had failed after heavy Christmas rains.

At the height of its rural prosperity Queanbeyan boasted sixteen public houses and six flourmills powered by wind, water, horse and steam. The Royal Hotel on Monaro Street opened in 1926. In Canberra alcohol was prohibited from 1911, at the time of the territory's foundation, until 1928, when Federal Parliament had relocated from Melbourne. In that period many of the capital's residents crossed the border to drink at one of Queanbeyan's hotels.

Queanbeyan was granted city status on 7 July 1972. On 21 July 1975 the Queen's Bridge was opened. This bridge took pressure off the existing bridge in linking Monaro Street directly to the east. From 1982 to 1989, the Canberra Raiders rugby league team played their home games in Queanbeyan, at Seiffert Oval.

Since December 2008, the Australian Defence Forces's HQ Joint Operations Command has been based adjacent to the Kowen district of the Australian Capital Territory, just south of the Kings Highway, about 15 km east of Queanbeyan, and 15 km south of Bungendore, New South Wales.

Heritage listings

Queanbeyan has a number of heritage-listed sites, including:

Today

Queanbeyan has two government high schools: Queanbeyan High and Karabar High. Queanbeyan primary schools include Queanbeyan South Public School, Queanbeyan West Public School, Queanbeyan East Public School, Queanbeyan Public School, Jerrabomberra Public School and St Gregory's Primary School.

The Queanbeyan District Hospital is a small but modern facility providing Maternity, Emergency and some Community Health services. Queanbeyan has an ambulance station, indoor and outdoor swimming pool, community centre, performing arts centre, a public library and several parks.

The city's local bus service is Qcity Transit, which also operates routes into Canberra.

Population

At the 2016 census, the Queanbeyan part of the Canberra–Queanbeyan built-up area had a population of 36,348 (this did not include Googong). [1] At the 2011 census, the former city of Queanbeyan had a population of 37,991. [13] The suburb of Queanbeyan (central Queanbeyan) had a population of 6,237 in 2016. [14]

Commerce and industry

Queanbeyan has two light manufacturing/industrial precincts centred on Gilmore Road and Yass Road. The Queanbeyan Solar Farm with 720 solar panels has a generating capacity of 50 kW, and is located in the Yass Road area. Queanbeyan has a large and significant retail market in roses, which are sourced from the local district.

Transport

Queanbeyan is served by NSW TrainLink Xplorer which runs several times each day between Canberra and Sydney, calling at heritage listed Queanbeyan railway station. NSW TrainLink also operates regional coaches via Queanbeyan city. [15]

Regional coach services to the coast and Canberra are also provided by Rixons Buses [16] and Murrays Coaches [17]

Air services are available at the nearby (10 km) Canberra airport.

Local bus services (including cross border services to Canberra and Canberra airport) are provided by Qcity Transit (formerly Deane's).

Sport and culture

Queanbeyan has a number of sports teams that play in local sports competitions.

TeamSportTournament
Queanbeyan Whites Rugby Union ACTRU Premier Division
Monaro Panthers FC Association Football NPL
Queanbeyan City FC Association Football
Queanbeyan Blues Rugby league Canberra Rugby League
Queanbeyan Kangaroos Rugby League Canberra Rugby League
Queanbeyan Tigers Australian Rules Football AFL Canberra
Queanbeyan Cricket Club Cricket ACT Cricket Competition
Queanbeyan United Hockey Club Field Hockey Hockey ACT

The Queanbeyan Show, which started over 100 years ago, is held annually at the Queanbeyan Showgrounds in November over two days. There are equestrian events, a sideshow alley, art and craft displays, cooking exhibits, an agricultural pavilion and livestock exhibitions. Also held is a Showgirl, Miss Junior Showgirl and Tiny Tots competition. Seiffert Oval is one of the largest stadia in the region.

In February, the Queanbeyan Showgrounds play host to the annual "Convoy for Kids" to aid cancer research. The event is widely supported by community groups, regional businesses and the emergency services. The event attracts hundreds of commercial vehicles, trucks, prime movers and bushfire brigade vehicles. The highlight of the afternoon is the sounding of horns, which can be heard for miles around. Other regular events throughout the year include the Rodeo in March, Field Days, and a camping and off-road vehicle show. Queanbeyan Basketball Stadium is based on Southbar Road near a SUPA IGA and is the main venue used for indoor sports like basketball and netball.

On 3 December, Queanbeyan hosts an annual Festival of Ability as part of the Don't DIS my ABILITY campaign, celebrating International Day of Persons with Disabilities. The event attracts more than 3,500 people and is a community celebration, acknowledging the strengths, skills and achievements of people with a disability in the Queanbeyan region.

In March 2008, the Queanbeyan Performing Arts Centre – the Q – became the new home for the Queanbeyan Players who have provided over thirty years of live theatre and dramatic entertainment for the Queanbeyan community. [18]

Canberra's Harmonie German Club holds an Oktoberfest over a three-day period every year in October. [19] In 2017 the event moved over the border to the Queanbeyan Showgrounds on 27–29 October. [20] [21]

Politics

Federally, Queanbeyan lies within the electorate of Eden-Monaro, currently held by Mike Kelly representing the Australian Labor Party.

At a state level, Queanbeyan is the major population centre in the seat of Monaro, and is currently held by John Barilaro of The Nationals.

Historic places and monuments

Notable residents

Queanbeyan's "Megan Still Court" immediately adjacent the City Council Chambers, named in honour of Queanbeyan's former olympic women's rowing pair gold medalist Megan Still Court QBN.jpg
Queanbeyan's "Megan Still Court" immediately adjacent the City Council Chambers, named in honour of Queanbeyan's former olympic women's rowing pair gold medalist

Suburbs

The Choirboys song 'Struggle Town' was written about Queanbeyan after lead singer Mark Gable heard the reference to the town from the band's drummer Lindsay Tebbutt's father called Queanbeyan "Struggle Town".

Climate

Queanbeyan has a subtropical highland climate (Cfb) with warm to hot summers and cold winters, similar to Canberra.

Climate data for Queanbeyan, New South Wales
MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Average high °C (°F)29.0
(84.2)
28.5
(83.3)
25.6
(78.1)
20.6
(69.1)
15.9
(60.6)
12.5
(54.5)
11.8
(53.2)
13.7
(56.7)
17.3
(63.1)
20.7
(69.3)
24.4
(75.9)
27.6
(81.7)
20.6
(69.1)
Average low °C (°F)12.7
(54.9)
12.9
(55.2)
10.7
(51.3)
6.6
(43.9)
3.3
(37.9)
0.9
(33.6)
−0.2
(31.6)
0.9
(33.6)
3.3
(37.9)
6.0
(42.8)
8.9
(48.0)
11.4
(52.5)
6.4
(43.5)
Average precipitation mm (inches)55.4
(2.18)
50.9
(2.00)
50.5
(1.99)
44.0
(1.73)
43.9
(1.73)
44.0
(1.73)
39.5
(1.56)
44.0
(1.73)
47.8
(1.88)
59.6
(2.35)
59.2
(2.33)
55.6
(2.19)
598.4
(23.56)
Average precipitation days5.65.25.15.25.66.86.97.47.56.86.16.175.8
Source: Bureau of Meteorology [40]
Lightning storms over Queanbeyan, 21 February 2007 Lightning 21 Feb 2007.jpg
Lightning storms over Queanbeyan, 21 February 2007

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