Queanbeyan

Last updated

Queanbeyan
New South Wales
Queanbeyan City Council Chambers in Crawford Street.jpg
Queanbeyan Council Chambers
Australia New South Wales location map blank.svg
Red pog.svg
Queanbeyan
Location in New South Wales
Coordinates 35°21′12″S149°14′03″E / 35.35333°S 149.23417°E / -35.35333; 149.23417 Coordinates: 35°21′12″S149°14′03″E / 35.35333°S 149.23417°E / -35.35333; 149.23417
Population37,511 (2021 census) [1]
 • Density210/km2 (540/sq mi)
Established1838
Elevation576 m (1,890 ft)
Area173 km2 (66.8 sq mi)
Time zone AEST (UTC+10:00)
 • Summer (DST)AEDT (UTC+11:00)
Location
LGA(s) Queanbeyan-Palerang Regional Council
County Murray
Parish Queanbeyan
State electorate(s) Monaro
Federal division(s) Eden-Monaro
City of Queanbeyan coat of arms.jpg
Mean max tempMean min tempAnnual rainfall
20.6 °C
69 °F
6.5 °C
44 °F
593.8 mm
23.4 in
Localities around Queanbeyan:
Beard Oaks Estate Queanbeyan East
Crestwood Queanbeyan Queanbeyan East
Queanbeyan West Karabar Greenleigh

Queanbeyan ( /ˈkwnbiən/ KWEEN-bee-ən) is a city in the south-eastern region of New South Wales, Australia, located adjacent to the Australian Capital Territory in the Southern Tablelands region. Located on the Queanbeyan River, the city is the council seat of the Queanbeyan-Palerang Regional Council. At the 2021 census, the Queanbeyan part of the Canberra–Queanbeyan built-up area had a population of 37,511. [1]

Contents

Queanbeyan's economy is based on light construction, manufacturing, service, retail and agriculture. Canberra, Australia's capital, is located 15 kilometres (9 miles) to the west, and Queanbeyan is a commuter town. The word Queanbeyan is the anglicised form of Quinbean, an Aboriginal word meaning "clear waters"[ citation needed ].

History

The first inhabitants of Queanbeyan are Ngambri peoples of the Walgalu Nation, the meeting place of two rivers was known by the local Indigenous population as Quinbean, which is the name of our Historical Journal. The traditional owners, the Ngambri, in ancestral times: Before white man’s arrival there were a thousand or more Ngambri and Ngurnal people living in family groups across their traditional lands. They were described as a fine, sturdy and athletic race, men and women well proportioned and finely finished… Their life was nomadic as the daily work of producing food took them across their lands according to the season and the weather. They sheltered for brief times under temporary gunyahs and for longer periods in more substantial bark and timber huts and in the sheltered areas provided by huge rock formations. To hunt and fight a Ngambri man prepared an arsenal of equipment. He generally owned spears of hard wood, boomerangs, a parrying shield, a nulla and a woomera to throw his spears. Tools that the Ngambri used included stone scrapers, cutting blades, axes and grindstones. Nets were woven from the flax extracted from the pimelia bush. Rugs and cloaks were sewn from the tanned skins of kangaroos and possums using fine animal sinews as thread. The Ngambri diet was high in protein from animal and reptile meat and fish. Carbohydrates came from tuberous plants including the yam daisy (microseris lanceolata), bulrush (typha orientalis) and convolvulus. The fruits of the native raspberry (rubus parvifolius) the apple berry (billardiera scandens) and the native cherry (exocarpos cupressiform) were high in fibre and sweet. Honey was a sweet treat. Each year the arrival of the bogong moth in caves in the mountains gave the Ngambri a feast and cause for celebration. Neighbouring clans would gather with the Ngambri in the mountains to gather the moths. The Yuriarra moth cooking stone was the base camp for the annual ceremonial gathering and eating of the highly nutritious bogong. The ceremony brought together groups of Aboriginal people to hunt and gather, and to renew their relationships. Friends and foes alike would put aside their differences. As the traditional custodians of the Bogong Mountains, the Ngambri and their kin group, the Ngurmal, hosted the ceremony. Women always took charge of the base camp and prepared the moths. (Matilda House) Marriages could be arranged between members of friendly clans, or by the theft of a woman from a less friendly group. A marriage was generally arranged by parents and a child could be promised at a very early age. Girls were often promised to older men, with the advantage of protecting the girl from young men and providing for the man in his old age. Sometimes a man would take two wives but their families were generally only two or three children. Tidbinbilla was a site for initiation rites. Women were excluded from the ceremony. A corroboree followed with women providing the beat for the dancers on taut animal skins. Burial places were treated with great respect and were avoided in the course of daily life. The Ngambri interred kin with ceremony, sometimes using caves, sometimes logs and sometimes in a seated position underground.Young men were initiated at puberty and friendly neighbours were invited to participate. The Ngambri learned from their trading partners of the arrival of white men who wanted their land and their women. In 1820 when white men arrived on horse back, the Ngambri moved into the hills to watch…

The town grew from a squattage held by ex-convict and inn keeper, Timothy Beard, on the banks of the Molonglo River in what is now Oaks Estate. The town centre of Queanbeyan is located on the Queanbeyan River, a tributary of the Molonglo River and approximately 1.4 kilometres (0.87 mi) south-southeast of Oaks Estate.

Queanbeyan was officially proclaimed a township in 1838 when the population was about 50. The local parish was also known by that name and later still the member for the electorate of Queanbeyan held a seat in the legislative assembly of the colony of NSW. On 28 November 1837 the Colonial Secretary announced the appointment of Captain Alured Tasker Faunce as resident police magistrate at Queanbeyan. His homestead, called Dodsworth, was situated on the banks of the Queanbeyan river opposite the town. [2] The town plan was laid out by surveyor James Larmer, in 1838. [3]

Traces of gold were discovered in 1851 and lead and silver mines also flourished briefly. Settlers were harassed by bushrangers, of which James Shaw, William Millet, and John Rueben, [4] John Tennant, Jacky Jacky, Frank Gardiner and Ben Hall were some of the more notorious. In 1836, a Post Office was established. [5]

The Commercial Banking Company of Sydney Limited (CBC, now part of the National Australia Bank) opened in Queanbeyan on 19 September 1859. The Bank of New South Wales began service in Queanbeyan in 1878. The Golden Age (now The Queanbeyan Age ) was Queanbeyan's first newspaper and was founded in 1860 by John Gale. In 1880 the residence of John James Wright, the first mayor of Queanbeyan, was constructed along the edge of the Queanbeyan River. In 1982 that building became the Queanbeyan Art Centre.

The Salvation Army claimed an outpost in Queanbeyan in 1884.

Queanbeyan, an increasingly successful primary producing district, was proclaimed a Municipality in February 1885 incorporating an area of 5,700 acres (23 km2). The railway reached Queanbeyan railway station in 1887 and it became the junction for the lines going to Canberra and Bombala. The town is served by the thrice-daily NSW TrainLink Xplorer service between Canberra and Sydney.

Bridge over the Queanbeyan River Queanbeyan river030.jpg
Bridge over the Queanbeyan River

William James Farrer, the wheat experimentalist, established Queanbeyan's reputation as an agricultural district with his famous "Federation" rust-free strain, developed on his property "Lambrigg" at Tharwa. Farrer's work was only slowly recognised elsewhere in Australia, but local farmers supported him, particularly in his development of "Blount's Lambrigg", another strain which in 1889 gave hope to farmers after the disastrous season of 1887 when crops had failed after heavy Christmas rains.

At the height of its rural prosperity Queanbeyan boasted sixteen public houses and six flourmills powered by wind, water, horse and steam. The Royal Hotel on Monaro Street opened in 1926. In Canberra alcohol was prohibited from 1911, at the time of the territory's foundation, until 1928, when Federal Parliament had relocated from Melbourne. In that period many of the capital's residents crossed the border to drink at one of Queanbeyan's hotels.

Queanbeyan was granted city status on 7 July 1972. On 21 July 1975 the Queen's Bridge was opened. This bridge took pressure off the existing bridge in linking Monaro Street directly to the east. From 1982 to 1989, the Canberra Raiders rugby league team played their home games in Queanbeyan, at Seiffert Oval.

Since December 2008, the Australian Defence Forces's HQ Joint Operations Command has been based adjacent to the Kowen district of the Australian Capital Territory, just south of the Kings Highway, about 15 km east of Queanbeyan, and 15 km south of Bungendore, New South Wales.

Heritage listings

Queanbeyan has a number of heritage-listed sites, including:

Today

Queanbeyan has two government high schools: Queanbeyan High and Karabar High. Queanbeyan primary schools include Queanbeyan South Public School, Queanbeyan West Public School, Queanbeyan East Public School, Queanbeyan Public School, Jerrabomberra Public School and St Gregory's Primary School.

The Queanbeyan District Hospital is a small but modern facility providing Maternity, Emergency and some Community Health services. Queanbeyan has an ambulance station, indoor and outdoor swimming pool, community centre, performing arts centre, a public library and several parks.

The city's local bus service is Qcity Transit, which also operates routes into Canberra.

After police operations at 8 Farrer Place were moved to temporary accommodation in Morisset Street, the old station, opened in July 1978, was demolished starting in February 2019. Construction of the new A$24 million station began in November 2019, completion was due January 2021. [15] [16] [17] The station became fully operational in March 2021, and was officially opened on 26 April 2021. [18]

Population

Christ Church Christ Church, Queanbeyan, front.jpg
Christ Church

At the 2021 census, the Queanbeyan part of the Canberra–Queanbeyan built-up area had a population of 37,511 (this did not include Googong). [1] At the 2011 census, the former city of Queanbeyan had a population of 37,991. [19] The suburb of Queanbeyan (central Queanbeyan) had a population of 6,409 in 2021. [20]

Commerce and industry

The Queanbeyan Solar Farm was established in 1999 Queabeyan Solar Farm.jpg
The Queanbeyan Solar Farm was established in 1999

Queanbeyan has two light manufacturing/industrial precincts centred on Gilmore Road and Yass Road. The Queanbeyan Solar Farm with 720 solar panels has a generating capacity of 50 kW, and is located in the Yass Road area. Queanbeyan has a large and significant retail market in roses, which are sourced from the local district.

Transport

Queanbeyan railway station Queanbeyan Railway Station (05).jpg
Queanbeyan railway station

Queanbeyan is served by NSW TrainLink Xplorer which runs several times each day between Canberra and Sydney, calling at heritage listed Queanbeyan railway station. NSW TrainLink also operates regional coaches via Queanbeyan city. [21]

Regional coach services to the coast and Canberra are also provided by Rixons Buses [22] and Murrays [23]

Air services are available at the nearby (10 km) Canberra airport.

Local bus services (including cross border services to Canberra and Canberra airport) are provided by Qcity Transit (formerly Deane's).

Sport and culture

Queanbeyan has a number of sports teams that play in local sports competitions.

TeamSportTournament
Queanbeyan Whites Rugby Union ACTRU Premier Division
Monaro Panthers FC Association Football NPL
Queanbeyan City FC Association Football
Queanbeyan Blues Rugby league Canberra Rugby League
Queanbeyan KangaroosRugby League Canberra Rugby League
Queanbeyan Tigers Australian Rules Football AFL Canberra
Queanbeyan Cricket Club Cricket ACT Cricket Competition
Queanbeyan United Hockey Club Field Hockey Hockey ACT
The "Q" - Queanbeyan Performing Arts Centre TheQ.jpg
The "Q" – Queanbeyan Performing Arts Centre

The Queanbeyan Show, which started over 100 years ago, is held annually at the Queanbeyan Showground in November over two days. There are equestrian events, a sideshow alley, art and craft displays, cooking exhibits, an agricultural pavilion and livestock exhibitions. Also held is a Showgirl, Miss Junior Showgirl and Tiny Tots competition. Seiffert Oval is one of the largest stadia in the region.

In February, the Queanbeyan Showground plays host to the annual "Convoy for Kids" to aid cancer research. The event is widely supported by community groups, regional businesses and the emergency services. The event attracts hundreds of commercial vehicles, trucks, prime movers and bushfire brigade vehicles. The highlight of the afternoon is the sounding of horns, which can be heard for miles around. Other regular events throughout the year include the Rodeo in March which was in its 20th year in 2020, [24] but was cancelled in 2021 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, [25] Field Days, and a camping and off-road vehicle show. Queanbeyan Basketball Stadium is based on Southbar Road in the suburb of Karabar and is the main venue used for indoor sports like basketball and netball.

On 3 December, Queanbeyan hosts an annual Festival of Ability as part of the Don't DIS my ABILITY campaign, celebrating International Day of Persons with Disabilities. The event attracts more than 3,500 people and is a community celebration, acknowledging the strengths, skills and achievements of people with a disability in the Queanbeyan region.

Queanbeyan hosts several car shows through the year among them being Shannons Wheels in March 2020, [26] and "Terribly British Day" in early December, a car and bike show that has been held in the Australian Capital Territory region since 1975. [27] The show was in years past held on the lawns of Old Parliament House. [28]

In March 2008, the Queanbeyan Performing Arts Centre – the Q – became the new home for the Queanbeyan Players who have provided over thirty years of live theatre and dramatic entertainment for the Queanbeyan community. [29]

Canberra's Harmonie German Club holds an Oktoberfest over a three-day period every year in October. [30] Previously held at Exhibition Park in Canberra (EPIC), in 2017 the event moved over the border to the Queanbeyan Showground on 27–29 October. [31] [32]

In 2021 a scaled-down, 2 day, version of the Canberra-based National Folk Festival, cancelled in 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic in Australia, titled "Good Folk", was held in Queanbeyan, across Saturday 3 April and Sunday 4 April. [33]

Politics

The Queanbeyan Government Service Centre building Queanbeyan Government Service Centre building.jpg
The Queanbeyan Government Service Centre building

Federally, Queanbeyan lies within the electorate of Eden-Monaro, currently held by Kristy McBain representing the Australian Labor Party.

At a state level, Queanbeyan is the major population centre in the seat of Monaro, held by Nichole Overall of The Nationals since February 2022.

Historic places and monuments

A former monastery, St Benedicts now houses a number of local businesses St Benedicts Queanbeyan.jpg
A former monastery, St Benedicts now houses a number of local businesses

Notable residents

Queanbeyan's "Megan Still Court" immediately adjacent the City Council Chambers, named in honour of Queanbeyan's former olympic women's rowing pair gold medalist Megan Still Court QBN.jpg
Queanbeyan's "Megan Still Court" immediately adjacent the City Council Chambers, named in honour of Queanbeyan's former olympic women's rowing pair gold medalist
Overlooking Karabar and the Queanbeyan River Queanbeyan River Drive.jpg
Overlooking Karabar and the Queanbeyan River
Bike paths connect the Queanbeyan CBD to Canberra Queanbeyan Bike Paths.JPG
Bike paths connect the Queanbeyan CBD to Canberra

Suburbs

The Choirboys song 'Struggle Town' was written about Queanbeyan after lead singer Mark Gable heard the reference to the town from the band's drummer Lindsay Tebbutt's father called Queanbeyan "Struggle Town".

Climate

Queanbeyan has an oceanic climate (Cfb) with warm summers and cool winters, similar to Canberra.

Climate data for Queanbeyan Bowling Club (1909–1956, rainfall 1870–2019); 580 m AMSL
MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Average high °C (°F)29.0
(84.2)
28.5
(83.3)
25.6
(78.1)
20.6
(69.1)
15.9
(60.6)
12.5
(54.5)
11.8
(53.2)
13.7
(56.7)
17.3
(63.1)
20.7
(69.3)
24.4
(75.9)
27.6
(81.7)
20.6
(69.1)
Average low °C (°F)12.7
(54.9)
12.9
(55.2)
10.7
(51.3)
6.6
(43.9)
3.3
(37.9)
0.9
(33.6)
−0.2
(31.6)
0.9
(33.6)
3.3
(37.9)
6.0
(42.8)
8.9
(48.0)
11.4
(52.5)
6.5
(43.6)
Average rainfall mm (inches)55.3
(2.18)
51.5
(2.03)
51.2
(2.02)
43.8
(1.72)
42.9
(1.69)
44.4
(1.75)
39.2
(1.54)
43.9
(1.73)
47.7
(1.88)
59.0
(2.32)
58.9
(2.32)
56.0
(2.20)
593.8
(23.38)
Average rainy days (≥ 1.0 mm)4.74.44.34.34.55.55.46.06.26.66.15.363.3
Source: Australian Bureau of Meteorology (1909–1956 temperatures, rainfall 1870-2019) [51]
Lightning storms over Queanbeyan, 21 February 2007 Lightning 21 Feb 2007.jpg
Lightning storms over Queanbeyan, 21 February 2007

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References

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