Quebec general election, 1970

Last updated
Quebec general election, 1970
Flag of Quebec.svg
  1966 April 29, 1970 1973  

110 seats in the 31st National Assembly of Quebec
56 seats were needed for a majority

  First party Second party
  Robert-Bourassa.jpg
Leader Robert Bourassa Jean-Jacques Bertrand
Party Liberal Union Nationale
Leader since January 17, 1970 October 2, 1968
Leader's seat Mercier Missisquoi
Last election 50 seats, 47.29% 56 seats, 40.82%
Seats won 72 17
Seat changeIncrease2.svg22Decrease2.svg39
Popular vote 1,304,341 564,544
Percentage 45.40% 19.65%
SwingDecrease2.svg1.9%Decrease2.svg21.17%

  Third party Fourth party
 PC Rene Levesque BAnQ P243S1D865.jpg
Leader Camil Samson René Lévesque
Party Parti créditiste Parti Québécois
Leader since March 22, 1970 October 14, 1968
Leader's seat Rouyn-Noranda Laurier (lost re-election)
Last electionpre-creationpre-creation
Seats won 12 7
Seat changeIncrease2.svg12Increase2.svg7
Popular vote 321,370 662,404
Percentage 11.19% 23.06%
SwingIncrease2.svg11.19%Increase2.svg23.06

Premier before election

Jean-Jacques Bertrand
Union Nationale (Quebec)

Premier-designate

Robert Bourassa
Quebec Liberal Party

The Quebec general election of 1970 was held on April 29, 1970, to elect members of the National Assembly of Quebec, Canada. The former Legislative Assembly had been renamed the "National Assembly" in 1968. The Quebec Liberal Party, led by Robert Bourassa, defeated the incumbent Union Nationale, led by Premier Jean-Jacques Bertrand.

National Assembly of Quebec single house of the Legislature of Quebec

The National Assembly of Quebec is the legislative body of the province of Quebec in Canada. Legislators are called MNAs. The Queen in Right of Quebec, represented by the Lieutenant Governor of Quebec and the National Assembly compose the Legislature of Quebec, which operates in a fashion similar to those of other Westminster-style parliamentary systems.

Quebec Province of Canada

Quebec is one of the thirteen provinces and territories of Canada. It is bordered to the west by the province of Ontario and the bodies of water James Bay and Hudson Bay; to the north by Hudson Strait and Ungava Bay; to the east by the Gulf of Saint Lawrence and the province of Newfoundland and Labrador; and to the south by the province of New Brunswick and the U.S. states of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, and New York. It also shares maritime borders with Nunavut, Prince Edward Island, and Nova Scotia. Quebec is Canada's largest province by area and its second-largest administrative division; only the territory of Nunavut is larger. It is historically and politically considered to be part of Central Canada.

Quebec Liberal Party provincial political party in Quebec, Canada

The Quebec Liberal Party is a federalist provincial political party in Quebec, Canada. It has been independent of the federal Liberal Party of Canada since 1955.

Contents

This election marked the first appearance by a new party, the sovereigntist Parti Québécois, led by former Liberal cabinet minister René Lévesque. The PQ won a modest seven seats, although Lévesque was defeated in his own riding.

Parti Québécois Sovereignist political party in Quebec, Canada

The Parti Québécois is a sovereignist and social democratic provincial political party in Quebec, Canada. The PQ advocates national sovereignty for Quebec involving independence of the province of Quebec from Canada and establishing a sovereign state. The PQ has also promoted the possibility of maintaining a loose political and economic sovereignty-association between Quebec and Canada. The party traditionally has support from the labour movement, but unlike most other social democratic parties, its ties with organized labour are informal. Members and supporters of the PQ are called "péquistes", a French word derived from the pronunciation of the party's initials.

René Lévesque Quebec politician

René Lévesque was a reporter, a minister of the government of Quebec (1960–1966), the founder of the Parti Québécois political party and the 23rd Premier of Quebec. He was the first Quebec political leader since Confederation to attempt, through a referendum, to negotiate the political independence of Quebec.

Only a few months after the election, Quebec faced a severe test with the October Crisis, in which Liberal cabinet minister Pierre Laporte was kidnapped and assassinated by the Front de libération du Québec, a violent pro-independence group.

October Crisis 1970 series of events in Quebec, Canada

The October Crisis occurred in October 1970 in the province of Quebec in Canada, mainly in the Montreal metropolitan area. Members of the Front de libération du Québec (FLQ) kidnapped the provincial Deputy Premier Pierre Laporte and British diplomat James Cross. In response, Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau invoked the only peacetime use of the War Measures Act. The kidnappers murdered Laporte and negotiations led to Cross's release and the kidnappers' exile to Cuba.

Pierre Laporte Canadian journalist, lawyer and politician

Pierre Laporte was a French Canadian lawyer, journalist and politician who was Minister of Labour of the province of Quebec before being kidnapped and assassinated by members of the group Front de libération du Québec (FLQ) during the October Crisis. Laporte's body was found in the trunk of Paul Rose's car.

Front de libération du Québec organization

The Front de libération du Québec was a separatist and Marxist-Leninist terrorist and paramilitary group in Quebec. Founded in the early 1960s, it was a militant part of the Quebec sovereignty movement. It conducted a number of attacks between 1963 and 1970, which totalled over 160 violent incidents and killed eight people and injured many more. These attacks culminated with the bombing of the Montreal Stock Exchange in 1969, and with the October Crisis in 1970, which began with the kidnapping of British Trade Commissioner James Cross. In the subsequent negotiations, Quebec Labour Minister Pierre Laporte was kidnapped and murdered by a cell of the FLQ. Public outcry and a federal crackdown subsequently ended the crisis and resulted in a drastic loss of support, with a small number of FLQ members being granted refuge in Cuba.

The Union Nationale, which had governed Quebec through most of the 1940s and 1950s, would never come close to winning power again. This was partly because a significant number of the Union Nationale's younger supporters had embraced sovereigntism, and shifted their support to the PQ.

Results

PartyParty leaderSeatsPopular vote
1966 Elected% Change#%% Change
Liberal Robert Bourassa 50 72 +44.0% 1,304,341 45.40% −1.9%
Union Nationale Jean-Jacques Bertrand 56 17 -69.6% 564,544 19.65% -21.2%
     Ralliement creditiste Camil Samson * 12 * 321,370 11.19% *
Parti Québécois René Lévesque * 7 * 662,404 23.06% *
    Other12 - -100% 20,311 0.70% −11.2%
Total108 108 - 2,872,970 100%  

Note:

* Party did not nominate candidates in the previous election.

1 including results of Rassemblement pour l'indépendance nationale and Ralliement national from previous election.

Ralliement national (RN) was a separatist and right-wing populist provincial political party that advocated the political independence of Quebec from Canada in the 1960s.

Vote share
PLQ
45.40%
PQ
23.06%
Union Nationale
19.65%
Ralliement créditiste
11.19%
Others
0.70%

See also

The politics of Quebec are centred on a provincial government resembling that of the other Canadian provinces, namely a constitutional monarchy and parliamentary democracy. The capital of Quebec is Quebec City, where the Lieutenant Governor, Premier, the legislature, and cabinet reside.

Timeline of Quebec history

This article presents a detailed timeline of Quebec history. Events taking place outside Quebec, for example in English Canada, the United States, Britain or France, may be included when they are considered to have had a significant impact on Quebec's history.

The New Democratic Party fielded thirteen candidates in the 1970 Quebec provincial election, none of whom were elected. Information about these candidates may be found on this page.

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