Quilt packaging

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Copper interconnects prepared for joining via quilt packaging QP 2.jpg
Copper interconnects prepared for joining via quilt packaging

Quilt Packaging (QP) is an integrated circuit packaging and chip-to-chip interconnect technology that incorporates conductive “nodules” fabricated on the sides of chips. These nodule structures function as extremely wide bandwidth, low-loss electrical I/O, with sub-micron mechanical chip-to-chip alignment. [1] When utilized for electrical I/O, QP nodules have demonstrated around 2 dB of insertion loss across the entire bandwidth from 50 MHz to 220 GHz. [2]

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References

  1. G.H. Bernstein, Q. Liu, M. Yan, Z. Sun, W. Porod, G. Snider and P. Fay, "Quilt Packaging: High Density, High-Speed Interchip Communications," IEEE Trans. on Advanced Packaging, 30(4), 731-740, 2007
  2. P. Fay, D. Kopp, T. Lu, D. Neal, G.H. Bernstein, J.M. Kulick, "Ultrawide Bandwidth Chip-to-Chip Interconnects for III-V MMICS, " IEEE Microwaves and Wireless Components Letters, Vol. PP, Issue 99, November 2013.