Rómulo Díaz de la Vega

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Rómulo Díaz de la Vega
Romulo Diaz de la Vega.PNG
A painting of Rómulo Díaz de la Vega.
23rd President of Mexico
In office
12 September 1855 3 October 1855
Preceded by Martín Carrera
Succeeded by Juan Álvarez
Personal details
Born(1800-05-23)23 May 1800
Mexico City
Died3 October 1877(1877-10-03) (aged 77)
Puebla, Puebla
NationalityMexican
Political party Conservative

Rómulo Díaz de la Vega (23 May 1800 — 3 October 1877) was de facto president of Mexico in 1855. [1] He studied military science and rose to the rank of general.

President of Mexico Head of state of the country of Mexico

The President of Mexico, officially known as the President of the United Mexican States, is the head of state and government of Mexico. Under the Constitution, the president is also the Supreme Commander of the Mexican armed forces. The current President is Andrés Manuel López Obrador, who took office on December 1, 2018.

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In 1821, he joined the Plan of Iguala. He fought in the Texas War of Independence and for that he was appointed lieutenant. He fought in 1838 against the French invasion during the Pastry War. He also fought in the Mexican-American war and he was captured at the Battle of Resaca de la Palma on May 9, 1846. [1] [2]

Plan of Iguala revolutionary proclamation

The Plan of Iguala, also known as The Plan of the Three Guarantees or Act of Independence of North America, was a revolutionary proclamation promulgated on 24 February 1821, in the final stage of the Mexican War of Independence from Spain. The Plan stated that Mexico was to become a constitutional monarchy, whose sole official religion would be Roman Catholicism, in which the Peninsulares and Creoles of Mexico would enjoy equal political and social rights. It took its name from the city of Iguala in the modern-day state of Guerrero.

Texas Revolution military conflict

The Texas Revolution was a rebellion of colonists from the United States and Tejanos in putting up armed resistance to the centralist government of Mexico. While the uprising was part of a larger one that included other provinces opposed to the regime of President Antonio López de Santa Anna, the Mexican government believed the United States had instigated the Texas insurrection with the goal of annexation. The Mexican Congress passed the Tornel Decree, declaring that any foreigners fighting against Mexican troops "will be deemed pirates and dealt with as such, being citizens of no nation presently at war with the Republic and fighting under no recognized flag." Only the province of Texas succeeded in breaking with Mexico, establishing the Republic of Texas, and eventually being annexed by the United States.

Pastry War Conflicto

The Pastry War, also known as the First French intervention in Mexico or the First Franco-Mexican War (1838–1839), began in November 1838 with the naval blockade of some Mexican ports and the capture of the fortress of San Juan de Ulúa in Veracruz by French forces sent by King Louis-Philippe. It ended several months later in March 1839 with a British-brokered peace. The intervention followed many claims by French nationals of losses due to unrest in Mexico.

Díaz de la Vega was military commander of Puebla in 1849 and Tamaulipas in 1850 and then Governor of Yucatán in 1853.

Governor of Yucatán chief executive of the Mexican state of Yucatán

According to the Political Constitution of the Free and Sovereign State of Yucatán, the exercise of the Executive Power of this Mexican state is placed in a single individual, that Constitutional Governor of the Free and Sovereign State of Yucatán who is chosen for a period of 6 years and is not eligible for reelection. The term of governor begins October 1 of the year of the election and finishes September 30 six years later.

When Martín Carrera left the presidency of the Republic in 1855, Díaz de la Vega, supported by the leaders of the military garrison, assumed the duties of President while someone else came to Mexico City to relieve him in office. [3] His government lasted 22 days, from 12 September to 3 October 1855.

Martín Carrera President of Mexico

Martín Carrera Sabat was a Mexican general and interim president of the country for about a month in 1855. He was a moderate Liberal. His family still influences Mexican politics, and some of his grandsons, were revolutionaries in the Mexican Revolution.

After his presidency, Díaz de la Vega was a member of the group of the conservatives who appointed Maximilian of Habsburg as emperor in 1863. After the triumph of the Republic, he was sentenced to two years imprisonment, but the penalty was switched by confinement in Puebla, where he died in October 1877, exactly twenty-two years to the day his tenure as President ended. [1]

Maximilian I of Mexico emperor of Mexico

Maximilian I was the only monarch of the Second Mexican Empire. He was a younger brother of the Austrian emperor Franz Joseph I. After a distinguished career in the Austrian Navy as its commander, he accepted an offer by Napoleon III of France to rule Mexico, conditional on a national plebiscite in his favour. France, together with Spain and the United Kingdom, invaded the Mexican Republic in the winter of 1861, ostensibly to collect debts; the Spanish and British both withdrew the following year after negotiating agreements with Mexico's republican government, while France sought to conquer the country. Seeking to legitimize French rule, Napoleon III invited Maximilian to establish a new pro-French Mexican monarchy. With the support of the French army and a group of conservative Mexican monarchists hostile to the liberal administration of the new Mexican president, Benito Juárez, Maximilian was offered the position of Emperor of Mexico, which he accepted on 10 April 1864.

Puebla State of Mexico

Puebla, officially the Free and Sovereign State of Puebla is one of the 31 states which, with the Federal District, comprise the 32 Federal Entities of Mexico. It is divided in 217 municipalities and its capital is the city of Puebla.

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References

  1. 1 2 3 "Rómulo Díaz de la Vega". PRESIDENCIA DE LA REPÚBLICA, MÉXICO. Retrieved July 26, 2012.
  2. Guns Along the Rio Grande: Palo Alto and Resaca de la Palma, CMH Pub 73-2, Center of Military History
  3. "El general Rómulo Díaz de la Vega asume de facto la presidencia de la República". Memoria Política de México. Retrieved July 26, 2012.
Political offices
Preceded by
Martín Carrera
President of Mexico
12 September - 3 October 1855
Succeeded by
Juan Álvarez