R-29 Vysota

Last updated
R-29 Vysota/RSM-40
SS-N-8 sketch.svg
Type SLBM
Place of originSoviet Union/Russia
Service history
In service1974–present
Used by Russian Navy
Production history
DesignerMakeyev Rocket Design Bureau
Specifications
Mass32,800 kg (72,300 lb)
Length13.2 m (43 ft)
Diameter1.8m

Propellantliquid [1]
Guidance
system
astro-inertial

R-29 Vysota Р-29 Высота (height, altitude) is a family of Soviet submarine-launched ballistic missiles, designed by Makeyev Rocket Design Bureau. All variants use astro-inertial guidance systems. [2]

Contents

Variants

R-29

R-29R

[ citation needed ]

R-29RK

[ citation needed ]

R-29RL

[ citation needed ]

R-29RM

R-29RMU

R-29RMU2

Operators

Flag of Russia.svg  Russia

Former operators

Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union

See also

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References

  1. "Ballistic and cruise missile threat". Archived from the original on 18 July 2017. Retrieved 20 July 2017.
  2. "R-29 / SS-N-8 SAWFLY". Archived from the original on 9 April 2015. Retrieved 4 April 2015.
  3. 1 2 "SAGE Journals: Your gateway to world-class journal research". bos.sagepub.com.
  4. ru:Подводные лодки проекта 667БДР «Кальмар»
  5. "Strategic Fleet". russianforces.org. January 2017. Retrieved 25 August 2019.
  6. "Two Project 667BDR submarines withdrawn from service". russianforces.org. 14 March 2018. Retrieved 25 August 2019.