R-5 Pobeda

Last updated
R-5
R-5V rocket on display.jpg
R-5 on display at the Zhytomyr Korolyov Museum
Type Theatre ballistic missile
Medium-range ballistic missile
Place of origin USSR
Service history
In service21 May 1956 – 1967
Specifications
Mass29,100 kg
Length20.75 m
Diameter1.65 m
Warhead60 \ 80 kt , 300 kt , 1 Mt (or more) thermonuclear warhead

EngineRD-103M, 8D52
Wingspan3.452 m
PropellantLiquid (92% Ethyl Alcohol/water solution & LOX)
Operational
range
1,200 km (750 mi) [1]
Guidance
system
inertial guidance plus radio command guidance
Accuracy3.5 km

The R-5 Pobeda [2] (Побе́да, "Victory") was a theatre ballistic missile developed by the Soviet Union during the Cold War. The R-5M version was assigned the NATO reporting name SS-3 Shyster and carried the GRAU index 8K51.

Contents

The R-5 was originally a development of OKB-1 as a single-stage missile with a detachable warhead reentry vehicle. The R-5M was a nuclear armed missile – the first nuclear missile to be deployed by the Soviet Union – with greater payload and weight but better reliability than its predecessor. The R-5M gave the Soviet Union the ability to target many strategic targets in Europe. The R-5M entered service on 21 May 1956 (retired in 1967), and in 1959 was installed at Vogelsang, Zehdenick and Fürstenberg/Havel in East Germany - the first Soviet nuclear missile bases outside the USSR. [3]

By the end of 1956, 24 launchers were deployed, with a final total of 48 produced by the end of 1957; around 200 missiles were built. The R-5M was deployed in brigades of six launchers each or regiments of four launchers each. The basic field unit was a division, each having two batteries with a single launcher. Brigades and regiments had deployments in Kapustin Yar, Kaliningrad, East Germany (from January to September 1959), Volgograd Oblast, Lithuania, the Russian Far East, and Ukraine. [4]

R-5 was additionally an oft-reported alternate designation for the K-5 (missile) air-to-air missile.

Specification

Operators

Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union

See also

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References

  1. "Ballistic and cruise missile threat". Defense intelligence ballistic missile analysis committee. 2017.
  2. "Soviet/Russian missile designations". Johnston's Archive.
  3. Stephen Evans (25 October 2012). "A Soviet missile base in Germany that spy planes never saw". BBC News.
  4. R-5M. Encyclopedia Astronautica.
  5. "Russian ballistic missiles" (in Russian). Archived from the original on 31 March 2013. Retrieved 14 September 2015.